1. CPM RSS
    Created by CPM RSS
    Mar 21, 2019 at 10:22 PM
    [​IMG]

    Written by cpm

    Download PDF Recent research has shed more light on the interaction seaweed extract has with crops and how it can bring best results. CPM explores the developments. During water stress periods like the summer of 2018 products containing seaweed kept the nutrient pump moving. By Andrew Blake Seaweed has long been applied to fields by farmers in coastal areas, who claim it has clear crop-enhancing properties. But pin-pointing exactly what those are and more significantly how they work has taken time. Now it seems researchers are homing in on their key function, namely countering so-called abiotic stress. Crop losses from abiotic stresses such as drought and extreme temperatures can far exceed those caused by biotic stresses such as insect and disease attacks, according to FMC Technical Manager Plant Health, Charlie Bannister. “A number of researchers have pointed out the effects of abiotic stress in terms of lost yield and quality.” One notable paper on the subject, authored by Elizabeth Bray and published in 2000, highlighted global yields for various crops and the losses from abiotic and biotic stresses. Up to 70% of global yield losses are due to abiotic stresses, such as heat, drought and cold. “In all cases losses…
    The post Research Briefing – The science of crop stress...
  2. CPM RSS
    Created by CPM RSS
    Mar 21, 2019 at 9:52 PM
    [​IMG]

    Written by cpm

    Download PDF Yara’s suite of digital farming services has been relaunched, with new options and smart refinements aimed at optimising application. CPM reviews what’s available. It’s vital to stay in control as these crops are going to be lush. By Tom Allen-Stevens Few could have predicted the kind start to the spring that arable farming has enjoyed. While conditions for March are widely seen as more ‘normal’ for the time of year, growers eager to take control of crops established last autumn will be wondering how to tailor nutrition strategy, notes Mark Tucker of Yara. “Many have already put on the first spring dressing of N to encourage the early growth we saw in Feb. The question is how to follow that up – is it wise to encourage it, in the knowledge that canopies may get out of control, or hold back, prompting concerns you’re holding back potential?” His advice leans towards the former. “The crop is growing and will be making extra demands from the soil that may not yet be readily available. It’s important to encourage that momentum, to give the plant every opportunity to lay down the biomass it’ll need to deliver its yield potential, and…
    The post Take control – The tools to tailor nutrition need appeared first on cpm magazine....
  3. CPM RSS
    Created by CPM RSS
    Mar 21, 2019 at 9:22 PM
    [​IMG]

    Written by cpm

    Download PDF An AHDB Monitor Farmer is using a precision agronomy platform as the basis for making changes to management practice. CPM reports. The aim is to build the detail over coming seasons and use it to help increase efficiency. By Paul Spackman While a number of farmers are now using precision agronomy to change seeding rates and identify poor-performing areas, Essex farmer Hew Willett is determined to take the technology a step or two further. Hew runs Parklands Farm near Chelmsford with his mother Christy. An AHDB Monitor Farmer, he’s keen to reduce production costs without compromising yields, and improve efficiency on the family farm. So he’s rolled out the Omnia precision farming system across 475ha of arable cropping after a successful trial last season. So far the system has mainly been used for analysing yield maps and producing variable seed rate plans to improve yield consistency on the heavy clay soil, but Hew and Farmacy agronomist Andrew Spackman are keen to expand its use to aid decision-making. “I like the fact Omnia brings lots of data together in one place and is very intuitive to use,” says Hew. “The aim is to build the detail over coming seasons…
    The post Precision agronomy – Digital tool drives agronomy decisions appeared first on...
  4. CPM RSS
    Created by CPM RSS
    Mar 21, 2019 at 9:22 PM
    [​IMG]

    Written by cpm

    Download PDF Novel technologies are being put into field trials to assess their value for growers. CPM finds out what it aims to achieve and gets an insight from the host of the project’s Technology Development Farm. We have the opportunity to take the lead, link knowledge with the innovation and deliver sustainable farming solutions. By Tom Allen-Stevens Hutchinsons has launched an ambitious initiative to evaluate a plethora of novel technologies, to understand how they can be of value to agriculture. The Helix project will put innovative tools, such as data analytics services, sensors, autonomy and robotics to the test in real-farming situations in a similar way to how the agronomy group currently assesses crop protection and nutrition products. “There’s a lot of science being directed towards agriculture, and those developing this area want direct contact with growers,” says Hutchinsons head of technology and innovation Stuart Hill. that are bringing a plethora of products to change the face of farming “We’re being exposed to a plethora of technologies such as data analytics, climate, machine learning, sensors, monitoring, detection systems, autonomy and robotics. But there’s a need to evaluate which of these are relevant and ultimately increase productivity and…
    The post...
  5. CPM RSS
    Created by CPM RSS
    Mar 21, 2019 at 9:12 PM
    [​IMG]

    Written by cpm

    Download PDF Bringing together the building blocks of a farming system forms the focus of activities at Forrest Farms in Suffolk. Once in place, using the best available technology brings results, as CPM finds out. I know that soil health is at its optimum, and the crop will be given every chance to perform. By Tom Allen-Stevens From the moment you arrive at the buildings of Forrest Farms, near Stowmarket, Suffolk, you know the farming operation you’re about to see will impress. On one side of the yard, spray operator Richard Farrow has drawn up the Agrifac self-propelled sprayer with its 5000-litre tank and 40m booms inside the new, purpose-built spray shed. Opposite, in the remarkably clean and well-ordered workshop, farm foreman Robert Hale and Dale White are putting the finishing touches to the Väderstad Tempo 12-row drill, ready to establish the sugar beet – you sense the quiet air of confidence from a team that’s at the top of their game. There’s a quiet air of confidence from a team at Forrest Farms that’s at the top of their game. It’s a standard that fifth generation farmer James Forrest is keen to maintain. “The long-term view for any family…
    The post Real Results Pioneers – The icing on the cake appeared first on cpm magazine....
  6. CPM RSS
    Created by CPM RSS
    Mar 21, 2019 at 8:42 PM
    [​IMG]

    Written by cpm

    Download PDF Kent grower Andrew Howard has been pioneering ways in which pulse crops can be grown together with other spring breaks to shore up returns. CPM visits to find how research through the farmer-led network could significantly boost benefits. Mother Nature never has a monoculture, and there’s a reason for that. By Tom Allen-Stevens As the spit of soil splits open on the fork, no fewer than three worms are caught like pink ribbons across the freshly cleaved surfaces, and retreat quickly into their interrupted burrows. “I counted 60 worms in a spadeful I dug up last year,” remarks Kent grower Andrew Howard, who’s poised to plant not one spring break crop, but two, in the same pass, into this field of alluvial loam that edges the River Stour near Ashford. “Everything we do is about improving the soil and geared towards creating a healthy environment around the seed, and that’s allowed us to reduce our inputs,” he says. Each horizontal slot created on either side of the disc can be set at different depths, allowing two seed types to be planted in the same pass. Since 2001, the plough hasn’t touched the 300ha of arable land, farmed by…
    The post Intercropping – Shared learning on sharing space appeared first on cpm magazine....
  7. News
    Created by News
    Mar 21, 2019 at 5:32 PM


    NFU urges Chancellor to act now to revise no-deal applied tariffs
    [​IMG]



    The UK farming unions have joined the NFU in writing to Chancellor Philip Hammond warning that the recent UK applied tariff policy announcement is another example of how British farming will be damaged by a no-deal Brexit.

    The letter reaffirms the farming unions’ position of being absolutely committed to avoiding a disorderly exit from the EU.

    NFU President Minette Batters said:

    “The government’s recent no-deal applied tariff policy announcement confirms our view that to leave the EU without a deal in place would be catastrophic for UK farming.

    “While we acknowledge that the tariff policy announced earlier this month is intended to be temporary and would be in direct response to an undesirable situation facing the country, we have very significant concerns about the damage this policy would cause to farmers across the country. Without the maintenance of tariff protections we would be in danger of opening up the UK to imported food which would be illegal to be produced here, produced at a lower cost because it may fail to meet the environmental and animal welfare standards which are legally required of our own farmers.

    “Under the no-deal tariff policy even...
  8. Agriland RSS
    Created by Agriland RSS
    Mar 21, 2019 at 4:42 PM
    [​IMG]

    Written by Agriland Team

    Farmers’ Union of Wales (FUW) president Glyn Roberts has written to Prime Minister Theresa May urging that preparations should be made for EU parliamentary elections.

    Roberts said it would avoid taking options off the table which are in the nations’ interest.

    The call comes following reports that the Prime Minister had written to the EU seeking an extension to the Article 50 period until 30 June.

    However, details of a leaked internal EU diplomatic memo published by the Independent online suggests that the leaders of the 27 Member States who must approve any extension period will have to choose either a short extension to before May 23, or a long delay until at least the end of the year.

    The memo states that an extension until 30 June “…would entail serious legal and political risks for the European Union and would import some of the current uncertainties in the United Kingdom into the EU 27”.

    The paper claims the memo added: “Any extension offered to the United Kingdom should either last until May 23, 2019, or should be significantly longer and require European elections.”

    Roberts’ letter states that the FUW supports the revocation of Article 50 in order to take full control over the Brexit process, and allow it to take place over a safe and realistic timescale.

    It adds: “If a short delay is agreed by the EU but Parliament again finds...
  9. Agriland RSS
    Created by Agriland RSS
    Mar 21, 2019 at 3:42 PM
    [​IMG]

    Written by Agriland Team

    A new digital agronomy and satellite mapping brand called Rhiza has been launched by Irish agricultural services firm Origin Enterprises.

    Launched last week at the European Space Agency headquarters, in Harwell, England, Origin unveiled Rhiza as its driver for satellite data for farmers and agronomists.

    “Digital agronomy is far broader and more affordable than the precision farming systems it has, until now, mainly been associated with,” according to Origin head of digital, Simon Beck.

    In its most basic format, the system logs and automatically transfers geo-referenced field-walking observations to farm records, which farmers can do using a phone or tablet with GPS and the ‘Contour’ app, Beck said.

    “You and your advisor use this to record and share information and pictures on areas of interest or concern so you can target management action throughout the season.

    “You can then relate these records to field performance and, if you have them, yield maps to plan future improvements.”

    Optical satellite imagery can be added for a more detailed service, to provide: a “health report” of every part of fields; radar-derived crop growth monitoring and yield predictions; weather-based local pest and disease modelling; and soil mapping and variable rate management tools.

    The firm has enlisted satellite company Planet for optical imaging, offering a revisit...
  10. Agriland RSS
    Created by Agriland RSS
    Mar 21, 2019 at 3:42 PM
    [​IMG]

    Written by Agriland Team

    An innovative industry-wide project is making significant strides to develop a farmer-led approach to nutrient management in Wales.

    Spearheaded by NFU Cymru, the Slyri Project (Slurry Project) aims to lower the risks of eutrophication, spillage and pollution from farmyard manure.

    The project aims to develop a slurry treatment process which can recover nutrients and allow the water recovered from slurry to be reused or discharged to a watercourse without lowering the water quality.

    Extracting most of the water from slurry can reduce the volume by around 80% making it easier to transport and spread in wet weather conditions.

    The initiative, which is the first of its kind in Wales, is led by water quality manager Lorna Davis and overseen by two key stakeholder groups; the project steering board and the water quality task and finish group.

    The project is funded by NFU Cymru and Natural Resources Wales (NRW). The project steering board includes representatives from the project lead NFU Cymru, FUW and Dwr Cymru Welsh Water, with advisory support from Welsh Government and NRW.

    The water quality task and finish group comprises of NFU Cymru members from all sectors across Wales providing insight and guidance on the aspirations of industry to evidence best practice, and how to achieve this.

    Both stakeholder groups are chaired by former NFU Cymru...