1. CPM RSS
    Created by CPM RSS
    Mar 21, 2019 at 1:12 PM
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    Written by cpm

    Now under new ownership, the InVigor line has another choice for growers looking for strong vigour in the late-sown slot. CPM reviews InV1155 and some of the research aimed at getting the best from the variety. If growers are pushed to later sowing this variety has the vigour to get away quickly. By Tom Allen-Stevens Vigour seems to be the buzzword in oilseed rape at present, and there’s one player in the market with such confidence on this score, it’s even built the word into the brand name. InV1155 is the one of the latest offerings from the InVigor line, now owned by BASF, after Bayer was forced to divest its seed portfolio on purchasing Monsanto last year. It joins InV1035, a variety exclusively available from Agrii that’s taken an impressive 10% of the non-Clearfield hybrid market, says BASF’s Dr Carol Norris. So how does InV1155 shape up against its stable mate? “Those two are the most vigorous varieties in our portfolio,” she says. “You can drill them up to mid Sept and you won’t lose yield. If you’re a grower aiming for the late window, InV1035 and InV1155 stand out as the best options to go for.” This…
    The post Insiders View – Setting standards in vigour? appeared first on cpm magazine....
  2. CPM RSS
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    Mar 21, 2019 at 1:12 PM
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    Written by cpm

    Download PDF Improving oilseed rape performance isn’t necessarily about rapid or radical change. Indeed, as CPM finds out from two growers at opposite ends of the country, sustained progress is more about steadily doing things even better. Success with OSR is all about getting the crop away rapidly and reliably. By Rob Jones The Scholes family on the Yorks Wolds and Richard Budd on the Weald of Kent grow oilseed rape in very different situations, on very different soils and with very different systems. But their approaches to improvement are remarkably similar. Both have focussed their efforts over the past 10 years on better understanding the crop and its needs; exploring what works and doesn’t work in making the most of it under their own circumstances; and continually developing their regimes to build on the former while minimising the latter. Andy Murr and Rachel Scholes have brought in over-the-weighbridge yields as high as 6.5t/ha from their silty loam with chalk ground. Across the 100-120 ha of OSR grown annually at Fimber Nab Farm near Driffield and on a variety of local contracts, five-year average yields are running at 4.25t/ha. What’s more, manager Andy Murr and Rachel Scholes – who runs…
    The post OSR Improvement – Establishment path to crop success...
  3. Agrovista News
    Created by Agrovista News
    Mar 21, 2019 at 1:12 PM
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    Lower yields tempered by better prices in 2018, but more challenges to come

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    Winter wheat yields this year are down by 10%, but the upside is better commodity prices, says Agrovista MD Chris Clayton, noting that although prices have slid a little since their peak, they should remain good for the coming season.

    The 2018 growing year had not been easy; a wet winter spilled over into a late spring, in which the soils quickly went from too wet to hard and dry, leading to stressed crops.

    While many winter crops caught up despite looking backward in March, spring-drilled crops did not have time to develop their root systems to scavenge for water and nutrients before soils dried, resulting in a lower commercial yields for many growers.

    Nevertheless, combinable crops matured a little earlier than usual during the long, warm summer, and the weather remained fair over harvest. Mr Clayton says: “We all gave a sigh of relief at the end of August when the cereals harvest was completed as it was an early, easy harvest, and there were low drying costs.”

    As the dry and warm weather continued, many growers hoping to improve establishment and yield potential brought their wheat drilling forward to the last week in August or very early September to take advantage of warmer...
  4. Agriland RSS
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    Mar 21, 2019 at 12:32 PM
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    Written by Agriland Team

    Payments worth more than £333 million have begun, Rural Economy Secretary Fergus Ewing has announced.

    In the coming months, eligible farmers, crofters and land managers will receive their Common Agricultural Policy Pillar 1 2018 entitlement.

    Around 78% of eligible claimants have already received up to 90% of their entitlement through a Government loan in October.

    As he made the announcement, Ewing called on Westminster to clarify the future of the Pillar 2 payment.

    “In line with the payment schedule I published last year, I can confirm that the first tranche of 2018 Basic Payment, Greening and Young Farmer payments has now begun,” he said.


    In total, over £300 million of European funding will be paid to more than 18,000 farmers, crofters and land managers, offset by the recovery of BPS2018 loans where customers chose to take one.

    “This funding will directly support investment, jobs and the rural economy moving forward, providing certainty for many in our rural communities. With further payments being made in the coming weeks and months, I am confident that the majority of payments will be made by the end of the payment window.

    “With Brexit continuing to present the biggest threat to the industry, I would remind farmers that the farm payment element of the Common Agricultural Policy payments are guaranteed at current...
  5. CPM RSS
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    Mar 21, 2019 at 12:12 PM
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    Written by cpm

    Download PDF Spring wheat is generally considered a poor entry for oilseed rape, but determined to address problems with blackgrass and cabbage stem flea beetle, One Cambs family business has made it work. CPM visits to find out how. You need a variety which will get up quick and get going in the late slot. By Tom Allen-Stevens As the last of the seed pours into the hopper, the freshening breeze picks up the bag and turns it into a windsock that thrashes helplessly on the loader fork, as if signalling a change of weather. Rain is indeed forecast, and Will Gee is keen to push on and establish what he can of the KWS Colchise spring wheat into the Grade 2 Fenland silts at Thorney, east of Peterborough, Cambs. The crop is being drilled a good month earlier than last year, and it’s part of a rotation that’s both addressing the farm’s blackgrass problem and allowing the oilseed rape crop to steer a path away from cabbage stem flea beetle damage. The spring cultivations leave a good friable tilth for the autumn OSR crop. “The spring wheat is grown for seed, which locks in a premium. But being later…
    The post OSR agronomy – Bending the rotational rules appeared first on cpm magazine....
  6. News
    Created by News
    Mar 21, 2019 at 11:24 AM
    John Deere is now offering a new PIN code locking system to help deter the theft of valuable GreenStar in-cab displays and StarFire satellite receivers. This has been designed to make it impossible to use the components if they are stolen.


    Because of their popular ‘plug and play’ design, John Deere displays and GPS receivers have also become more susceptible to theft compared to some other systems on the market. Until now, they could only be locked and protected mechanically. To increase the level of protection, John Deere has therefore introduced the built-in PIN code lock, similar to that used on smartphones, for both components.


    The PIN code for the display and the receiver can be entered via the John Deere display. If the user forgets the code, they can continue working for a limited period, up to a maximum of 72 hours. After this a Master Unlock Code is required, which can be easily generated in the StellarSupport online portal. The customer’s MyJohnDeere login grants access to any John Deere component previously registered in their StellarSupport account.



    The new PIN code locking system is now available for John Deere 4240 and 4640 Universal Displays and the StarFire 6000 receiver. It is bundled with the recent 19-1 software update, which permits the upgrade of these specific displays and receivers.


    This latest security feature complements the range of precautions already introduced by John Deere this decade to deter thieves. The company’s agricultural...
  7. CPM RSS
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    Mar 21, 2019 at 11:12 AM
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    Written by cpm

    Download PDF Pressure on an ever-dwindling armoury of broadleaf weed herbicides, essential for keeping a plethora of common and unfamiliar species in check, is putting increasing pressure on growers and agronomists to deliver cost-effective control solutions. FMC manufactures many of the leading SU products with a proven track record, enabling the industry to keep one step ahead of this growing problem. There’s a family of weeds on the increase across the country and they’re very competitive if left unchecked. CPM finds out how to prevent the umbellifers from stealing your yield. Early control is the best approach. By Lucy de la Pasture More often than not it’s grassweeds that dictate herbicide programmes and any surviving broadleaf weeds are mopped up in the spring. That approach has led to a spectrum of broadleaf weeds that has changed in response to herbicide use and the development of herbicide resistance in some broadleaf species. The result is a swing in the spring weed population towards certain weed species that are able to capitalise on holes in autumn herbicide programmes and exploit the gap left by the successful control of other weed species. Most notably on the increase are weeds from the Apiaceae family,…
    The post Tech Talk – Tackling umbelliferous weeds...
  8. CPM RSS
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    Mar 21, 2019 at 10:12 AM
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    Written by cpm

    Earlier this month the UK Cereal Pathogen Virulence Survey (UKCVPS) held its annual stakeholder meeting. Although there were no major surprises, CPM finds out there’s more going on than meets the eye. I’d hesitate to describe the yellow rust population as stable. By Lucy de la Pasture For the first time in several years the UKCVPS was able to report that last year all appeared calm, with no particular reason to expect varieties to behave differently to their resistance ratings on the AHDB Recommended List. Yet underneath the headline, the field of science studying pathogen virulence is paddling furiously to keep up and maybe even get ahead of the constant changes in the UK’s pathogen population, particularly for yellow rust. “I’d hesitate to describe the yellow rust population as stable,” says Sarah Holdgate, plant pathologist at NIAB who leads the UKCVPS project. “But what I can say is that there have been no major shifts since the last big change in 2016, when the Red 24 group of isolates came to prominence. But in 2018 we have seen some stabilisation, with a couple of pathotypes most dominant in the samples tested.” Sarah Holdgate says their were no…
    The post Cereal disease – Pathogenomics provide rust insight appeared first on...
  9. Agriland RSS
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    Mar 21, 2019 at 8:22 AM
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    Written by Agriland Team

    The CLA (Country Land and Business Association) has responded to Defra’s consultation, Improving the Management of Water in the Environment, highlighting that there is no justification to ending compensation for changes in water abstraction licenses.

    Instead, the response argues that any variation of licenses to abstract water should be used as a last resort with water companies encouraged to reduce leakages, consumers pushed to be more efficient, and farmers urged to trade water and invest in winter storage facilities, first.

    The consultation follows commitments made by the government for clean and plentiful water and to reduce the risks of harm from environmental hazards, as set out in the 25-Year Plan on the Environment.

    In addition, the water industry is to invest £50 billion over the next five years to improve water quality and drought resilience across the UK.

    Susan Twining, CLA’s chief land use policy advisor said: “While we wouldn’t condone unsustainable abstraction of water by any means, and support the collaborative efforts to address the problems, it is simply wrong for the government to propose revoking licenses without proper redress.


    Many of these licenses have been in place for decades, form a vital part of many businesses’...​
  10. Agriland RSS
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    Mar 21, 2019 at 5:12 AM
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    Written by Rachel Martin

    Within six months of launching, an initiative to “stamp out” BVD has signed up more than 120 veterinary practices across England.

    The £5.7 million ‘Stamp It Out’ initiative was launched by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) last summer in a bid to eradicate the highly contagious cattle disease Bovine Vial Diarrhoea (BVD).

    BVD costs UK farmers an estimated £61 million a year in lost performance.

    Neil Carter of SAC Consulting, which is responsible for delivering the programme, said: “To have allocated all of the money only six months into delivery is fantastic.

    “It shows that the industry has a real desire to control and eradicate the disease from our national herd.”

    Under the Stamp It Out scheme, funded by the Rural Development Programme for England (RDPE), farmers can access up to £530 of their vet’s time to investigate the disease both on a one-to-one basis or through a series of cluster meetings with like-minded keepers.

    They can also access £61.80 for preliminary testing work, and up to £440 where there is evidence of persistently infected animals.

    Industry support


    Vets who have signed up to the scheme have made a commitment to engage 8,000 farmers in active BVD control by 2020 – with 3,000 signed up so far.

    A further 2,000 farmers have asked to join the BVDFree England initiative,...