Countryside Seeds Ltd

Discussion in 'TFF Agricultural Directory' started by Chris F, Jan 9, 2015.

Countryside Seeds Ltd
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  1. Great In Grass

    Location:
    Cornwall.
    PERMANENT LONG-TERM
    Intensive long-term grazing mixture with cutting option.

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  2. Great In Grass

    Location:
    Cornwall.
    BARMIX LONG-TERM
    The long-term, low input, high output mixture for beef and sheep enterprises.

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  3. Great In Grass

    Location:
    Cornwall.
    New Aber High Sugar Grass Mixture Formulated for Multi-Cut Silage Systems

    Available from Countryside Seeds.

    A specialist grass silage mixture formulated to suit increasingly popular ‘multi–cut’ systems has been launched by Germinal at the Dairy–Tech event.
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    Comprised exclusively of high–ranking Aber® High Sugar Grass perennial ryegrasses, Aber HSG 2 Multi–Cut is designed to produce large quantities of leafy high–quality silage from frequent cutting during the period of peak grass growth.

    A balance of diploid and tetraploid varieties, with a tight spread of heading dates, provides the essential elements of high D–value and outstanding silage yields, plus good ground cover and persistency, to ensure consistent performance over a 6 to 8–year period.

    “From a recent survey of UK dairy farmers, we are reporting a significant shift towards the more progressive approach of earlier and more frequent cutting,” says Germinal GB National Agricultural Sales Manager Ben Wixey. “This approach is being referred to as ‘multi–cut’ and we’re leading the way by creating a new version of our Aber HSG 2 specialist cutting mixture.

    “The formulation will work particularly well for those aiming for an early first cut, then taking two subsequent cuts at 4 weekly intervals. With this approach, the potential is there to make the main proportion of the season’s grass silage by mid–July, allowing high quality grazing for the remainder of the growing season.

    “Ultimately the aim is to make higher quality grass silage, to create the potential to produce more from homegrown forage. This mixture has the ingredients to maximise ME yield per hectare and create a higher energy grass silage to underpin a forage–based approach.”

    Aber HSG 2 Multi–Cut is included in Germinal’s 2018 Forage Seed catalogue. There is also an option to include the long–lasting red clover AberClaret in this mixture, to provide additional protein content. All Aber High Sugar Grass varieties included in the mixture are high–ranking on the 2018 Recommended Grass and Clover List.
  4. Great In Grass

    Location:
    Cornwall.
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    Grass seed mixture and Fodder Crops catalogues:

    100% Higher Voluntary Seed seed standard mixes containing fully listed RGCL/SAC varieties.

    Attached Files:

  5. Great In Grass

    Location:
    Cornwall.
    New survey reveals shift to more progressive grass silage–making practice
    Trends towards more progressive grass silage–making practices identified in a new dairy farmer survey should help UK producers improve milk from forage performance, but care is needed to ensure producers maximise the benefits.
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    This was the joint message from Germinal and Volac at a briefing on the results of a new multi–cut grass silage–making survey, which points to the increasing popularity of taking first cuts earlier and making more frequent subsequent cuts.

    In the survey of over 150 dairy farmers, of whom an overwhelming 89% expressed a desire to increase their milk from forage, 60% stated that first cuts have become earlier over the past three years and 44% reported shortening their cutting intervals.

    “We are clearly seeing a significant shift towards a more progressive approach to grass silage–making amongst UK dairy farmers,” said Germinal GB’s Ben Wixey. “This move to earlier and more frequent cutting is often referred to as ‘multi–cut’.

    “The clear majority are making these changes for very good reasons. Among those farmers already taking more silage cuts per year, or intending to, the top reasons given were: to make better quality silage (71% of respondents); to make more milk from grass silage (68%); and to reduce bought–in feed costs (65%). Far fewer, just 40%, were doing it to increase their overall grass silage quantity.”

    The survey also found that of the 44% of respondents who had already changed to a shorter cutting interval in the past three years, 92% were seeing a level of improvement in grass silage quality, with 54% saying quality was much better.



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    “This shift to multi–cut appears to be working for these early adopters,” continued Ben Wixey. “This is great news, but we want to ensure that as the practice moves into the mainstream, the changes in management needed to maximise the potential benefits of the system are fully understood.

    “Success starts by ensuring leys are in the best possible condition, which for many will mean more frequent reseeding than is commonly practised on most dairy farms. It will then include everything from how fields are managed the previous autumn through to how the higher energy grass silage is fed.”

    Echoing this, Volac’s Derek Nelson highlighted silage preservation as a key example of where clarity is required with a multi–cut approach, as survey results revealed some confusion.

    “Fundamentally, the steps involved in making grass silage don’t change if adopting a multi–cut approach, but some steps may need extra attention to detail,” explained Mr Nelson. “When wilting, for example, because individual cuts are likely to be lighter, you can reach the optimum 28–32% dry matter for ensiling much quicker. So it’s important not to over–wilt.

    “Similarly, because crops are cut younger, they are likely to be higher in protein and metabolisable energy (ME). Higher protein is a good thing, but it can negatively affect the fermentation, and therefore the preservation of nutrients. So there’s a clear case for boosting fermentation efficiency with a proven additive. Yet only 35% of respondents in the survey recognised that taking more cuts can increase the need for a silage additive.”

    Interestingly, the cost of additive treatment per cut is likely to be lower with a multi–cut system, said Mr Nelson, because individual cuts will weigh less and an additive is applied per tonne.

    “Another area to pay attention to is chop length,” Mr Nelson highlighted. “Younger, leafier crops are likely to be easier to consolidate in the clamp than older, stemmy ones, so there’s less of a need to strive for very short chop lengths.

    “Also, at feedout, the resulting silage will have a higher energy density, so allowing savings in bought in feed costs, but it may need supplementing with additional fibre.”

    Ben Wixey stressed the importance of ley composition as an important prerequisite to success with a multi–cut system:

    “Firstly, silage fields must have the potential for early season growth of high D–value grass,” he concluded, “so leys should comprise of modern perennial ryegrasses selected with the right attributes from the Recommended Grass and Clover List. Then it’s about ensuring every step of the process maximises the potential of turning quality grass into high energy forage.

    “Carried out correctly, a more progressive approach to grass silage–making can significantly increase milk from forage figures for most UK dairy farmers.”
  6. Great In Grass

    Location:
    Cornwall.
    2018 Barenbrug Hunters equine grass mixtures;

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  7. Great In Grass

    Location:
    Cornwall.
    Barenbrug Hunter's mixed herbs, specially blended for equestrian use;

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  8. Great In Grass

    Location:
    Cornwall.
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    Available for 2018, Smart Rotations is a concept that seeks to maintain a carbon link between microbial communities and host crops during commercial production of food and forage, through the intervention with inoculum products and prudent land management.

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    A highly biologically active soil is a farmer’s ally in the quest to reduce fertiliser inputs, increase plant health, enhance yields and mitigate abiotic and biotic stresses such as drought and pathogen attack. Through the inoculation of agricultural crops with suitable biologically active products, farmers can enhance and stimulate the vast microbial resources within their soils to increase mineralisation, transportation and use of soil nutrients

    The Smart Rotations suite of products can help to restore and balance the microbial balance in soils damaged by farming techniques. In order to gain most benefits, careful crop management is recommended. Download the full Smart Rotations document for detailed information on when to treat soils and how to manage farmlands for biological below-ground diversity.

    Conventional farming techniques can disrupt ecosystem stability and deplete soils of beneficial biological components. Such detrimental techniques include soil disruption (ploughing), fallow periods , over-application of agro-chemicals and cropping with non-mycorrhizal plants such as Brassicas.
  9. Great In Grass

    Location:
    Cornwall.
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    SR2: Cover, Catch, Forage Crops & Leys

    Info & Benefits
    Contains beneficial arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria.

    Arguably the most important of all soil microbes for the support of commercial farming are mycorrhizal fungi. These fungi act as a vast secondary root system extending a crops access to water and nutrients by over 700 times.

    The ideal time to build up mycorrhizal communities is during the planting of cover crops, forage crops and leys. Particularly grasses and legumes are excellent hosts for mycorrhizal fungi and support the establishment of a robust fungal network. This benefits cover- as well as follow-on cash crops.

    Research has shown consistently that increased crop performance be observed when using other biologicals such as Plant Growth Promotion Rhizobacteria (PGPR) are combined a thriving mycorrhizal fungi community.
    SR2 is a dry granule and can be mixed with seeds during sowing, applied by broadcasting or via a suitable granular applicator. PlantWorks can offer advice on suitable systems. A range of seed sellers can also supply seed mixes pre-blended with SR2.

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    Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) have the ability to fix atmospheric Nitrogen and unlock soil-bound Phosphorus. They work in synergy with AMF, which transport nutrients to host plants. PGPR support a robust plant immune system for healthier crops and produce phytohormones such as auxins and cytocinins, aiding growth and development of plants.
    Benefits
    • Establishes vast fungal network for follow on crops
    • Increased availability and uptake of Nitrogen and Phosphorus
    • Increased Drought Tolerance and Water Use Efficiency
    • Improved Crop Quality and Yield
    • Improved resistance against pests and diseases
    • Builds biologically active soils
    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associate with 90% of all crop plants. By growing into the root, as well as accessing large areas of soil around the plant, these remarkable fungi effectively increase the uptake surface area of plant roots up to 700 times. Additionally plant defence mechanisms are improved by the partnership. Put simply, plants colonised by AMF are healthier and significantly more efficient at collecting water and nutrients from the soil.
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    • 10kg tubs
    • Application Rate – 10kg/ha
    • Granular formulation in fine or coarse grade
    • Proprietary blend of UK cultivated Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR)
    • AMF component contains active structures of 5 species at 100k propagules per Litre
    • Bacterial species supplied at CFU of 10^7 cells per ml
  10. Great In Grass

    Location:
    Cornwall.
    Available for 2018:

    SR3: Beets and Spinach, Carrots and Potatoes, Onions and Leeks
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    A range of three formulations of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria for Beets, Brassicas and Cereals.

    A range of liquid formulations of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria each tuned and tested for optimum performance in the field for use pre drilling and post germination. These bacteria are produced in sterile laboratory conditions to be applied at 10^15 bacteria per hectare, on average delivering 100 million bacteria for each plant treated. Field results have shown weight increases of up to 33% in sugar beet, 10% in beetroot and 6% in onion as well as 13% increased leek circumference. Research also indicates positive yield responses for carrots, potatoes and spinach.

    These products are easy to use and contain a water conditioner, liquid bacteria and a biostimulant. Recommended at a dilution rate of 200L of water per hectare using standard sprayer equipment.

    Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) have the ability to fix atmospheric Nitrogen and unlock soil-bound Phosphorus. They work in synergy with AMF, which transport nutrients to host plants. PGPR support a robust plant immune system for healthier crops.

    Benefits
    • Improved crop quality and yield
    • Increased availability and uptake of nitrogen and phosphorus
    • Improved plant vigour for better disease resistance
    • Builds biologically active soils
    PlantWorks’ researchers have shown that different species of PGPR give benefits to different plant types, indeed some strains can benefit some crops and suppress others. The bacterial strains in SR3 have been specifically selected and formulated to give maximum benefits for three crop types. When ordering S3, please specify which product formulation you require –
    SR3 Beets and Spinach, SR3 Carrots and Potatoes, SR 3 Onions and Leeks.
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    • Product size: 5 hectare treatment includes: 50ml pouch of bacterial inoculant, 1L bottle of biostimulant
    • Also included is a sachet of dechlorinating water conditioner for use with tap-water in tank mix
    • Bacterial species supplied at CFU 10^15
      cells per ml
    • Three formulations for specific crop types:
      SR3 Beets and Spinach, SR3 Carrots and Potatoes, SR3 Onions and Leeks
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  11. Great In Grass

    Location:
    Cornwall.
    SR1: Vegetables and Pulses
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    Contains beneficial arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    SR1 offers growers of high value vegetable crops the ability to harness natural microorganisms to achieve yield benefits as well as improved plant and soil health.
    Applied using a granular applicator (e.g. Stocks AG or Techneat) PlantWorks’ SR1 dry granule mycorrhizal fungi can be placed precisely in the seed zone and once germinated will associate with compatible crops within as little as two weeks.

    Benefits
    • Improved crop quality and yield
    • Increased availability and uptake of nitrogen and phosphorus
    • Increased drought tolerance and water use efficiency
    • Enhances systemic plant defences
    • Improved resistance against pests and diseases
    • Builds biologically active soils
    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associate with 90% of all crop plants. By growing into the root, as well as accessing large areas of soil around the plant, these remarkable fungi effectively increase the uptake surface area of plant roots up to 700 times. Additionally plant defence mechanisms are improved by the partnership. Put simply, plants colonised by AMF are healthier and significantly more efficient at collecting water and nutrients from the soil.

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