20t HGV for farm use

mountfarm

Member
Thinking about buying a 20t HGV tipper for farm use only. What are the legalities of doing this?
I’m sure I’ve seen somewhere before if you derate them to 25mph you can then run them on red diesel just like a tractor? It would only have to cross a public road from private drive to private drive but I’d want to be right legal wise.
 

Spud

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
YO62
I assume you're looking at an 8 wheeler? 32t gvw, 20t payload? It needs to be roadworthy (Get an independent mechanic to check it over once a year pre busy season, and provide a certificate of roadworthiness, and at least check it over visually yourself periodically) Can run on red diesel, obviously needs insurance, and be registered as limited use. (1.5km max radius of base, 6miles a week restrictriction.
 

defender

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
Easily done as limited use but as said keep it roadworthy , It is worth getting it checked by an independent mechanic to provide a record should the worst happen
I used a lorry on limited for a lot of years without issue . When it was changed I went to dvla office and they made it so it did not look for mot when applying online for tax disc . Another limited use done through Swansea always had to be taxed at the post office and an mot exemption form completed
 

mountfarm

Member
I assume you're looking at an 8 wheeler? 32t gvw, 20t payload? It needs to be roadworthy (Get an independent mechanic to check it over once a year pre busy season, and provide a certificate of roadworthiness, and at least check it over visually yourself periodically) Can run on red diesel, obviously needs insurance, and be registered as limited use. (1.5km max radius of base, 6miles a week restrictriction.

Yes it roadworthy and in license presently. It’s from a retiring one man band and has been meticulously maintained. He’s mainly used it as a sub contractor on jobs with the local council hauling stone. We know him well.
It’s a 2006 plate with 700,000 miles on the clock. Scania truck unit with a Wilcox tipper body with electric roll sheet. The only thing it hasn’t got is auto tailgate so it’s a manual which is a bit annoying. I’ve spoken to the mechanic that mot’s it and he said we won’t find anything better. The price is £7,500.

My only question really is how feasible is it to put it on flotation tyres. The mot mechanic knows nothing about agricultural tyres on a HGV so can’t help but ideally it needs to run down tramlines at harvest as well as tip muck out during the winter but we have some ex military matting for muck pile tipping.
 

Spud

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
YO62
Yes it roadworthy and in license presently. It’s from a retiring one man band and has been meticulously maintained. He’s mainly used it as a sub contractor on jobs with the local council hauling stone. We know him well.
It’s a 2006 plate with 700,000 miles on the clock. Scania truck unit with a Wilcox tipper body with electric roll sheet. The only thing it hasn’t got is auto tailgate so it’s a manual which is a bit annoying. I’ve spoken to the mechanic that mot’s it and he said we won’t find anything better. The price is £7,500.

My only question really is how feasible is it to put it on flotation tyres. The mot mechanic knows nothing about agricultural tyres on a HGV so can’t help but ideally it needs to run down tramlines at harvest as well as tip muck out during the winter but we have some ex military matting for muck pile tipping.
That's a good buy. It'll be 700,000km, which is about 440,000miles. Nowt.
Is it a grain body, or a lower sided aggregate one? You might struggle to get enough grain onboard without building some greedy boards.
@Terry Elsey Tyres will sort you out with tyres.
@limey2450 any advice?
 

Enfoff

Member
Location
Bourne
That's a good buy. It'll be 700,000km, which is about 440,000miles. Nowt.
Is it a grain body, or a lower sided aggregate one? You might struggle to get enough grain onboard
Without building some greedy boards.

A chap near me does this with ex aggregate lorries definitely needs boards. He uses 3 or 4 and carts all his grain plus has a curtain sider for fert
 

mountfarm

Member
That's a good buy. It'll be 700,000km, which is about 440,000miles. Nowt.
Is it a grain body, or a lower sided aggregate one? You might struggle to get enough grain onboard without building some greedy boards.
@Terry Elsey Tyres will sort you out with tyres.
@limey2450 any advice?
No definitely miles not km. And it’s a high sided body as it was bought to haul woodchip originally. The council work appeared at a later date.

What I’m confused about is that the rear axles are twins so how can flotations be added? If we have to start changing axles it’s a non starter. But there’s 10 tyres on it at the moment so could be very expensive to alter?
Ideally I’d like it running 650mm on 4 rear tyres and something similar at the front depending on how the steering works.
 

defender

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
I just had twin wheels with tyres with a good off road tread and worked ok if it was firm
Always fancied floatations but couldn't justify spending the money
Double drive and diff lock on your truck ?
 

Andrew

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Huntingdon, UK
No definitely miles not km. And it’s a high sided body as it was bought to haul woodchip originally. The council work appeared at a later date.

What I’m confused about is that the rear axles are twins so how can flotations be added? If we have to start changing axles it’s a non starter. But there’s 10 tyres on it at the moment so could be very expensive to alter?
Ideally I’d like it running 650mm on 4 rear tyres and something similar at the front depending on how the steering works.
Easy, unbolt the twins and bolt a single float rim in their place. It sounds bad, but if the threaded section of the wheel studs isn’t long enough, you can cut the centre out of one of the old rims and use it as a washer, as you’re barely on the road. To do it properly it’s not a big job to whip the drums off and fit new studs.
 

Renaultman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Darlington
Easy, unbolt the twins and bolt a single float rim in their place. It sounds bad, but if the threaded section of the wheel studs isn’t long enough, you can cut the centre out of one of the old rims and use it as a washer, as you’re barely on the road. To do it properly it’s not a big job to whip the drums off and fit new studs.
Also standard commercial axle trailer wheels and tyres would go straight on. Only problem is they aren't a traction pattern but I think they would do a job.
 

mountfarm

Member
Easy, unbolt the twins and bolt a single float rim in their place. It sounds bad, but if the threaded section of the wheel studs isn’t long enough, you can cut the centre out of one of the old rims and use it as a washer, as you’re barely on the road. To do it properly it’s not a big job to whip the drums off and fit new studs.
What’s the biggest tyre I can get on?
 

AHDB winding down horticulture and potatoes operations as Ministerial decision awaited

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AHDB has announced yesterday it is winding down significant activities on behalf of the horticulture and potatoes sectors.

While still awaiting a decision on the future by Ministers in England, Scotland and Wales, AHDB wants to reassure levy payers their views have been heard following recent ballots in the two sectors.

AHDB is now stopping programmes of work that could be restarted in the future by grower associations, individual growers or the supply chain. This work includes for example, export market access and promotional international trade event work, consumer marketing campaigns and market pricing and insight information. AHDB will continue to deliver limited emergency work on pests and diseases, including the Extension of Authorisation for Minor Use (EAMU)’s and some...
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