250,000 heifer

Cowgirl

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Ayrshire
And anyway, that's enough about Limousins.

What about Salers. Should they be allowed to enter the Grand National?????
I remember many years ago when we lived in Northamptonshire, a Limousin bullock escaped from Northampton market. It sailed over hedges and ditches across our land and our neighbour’s with an ability that any steeplechaser would have been proud of. I’ll never forget the sight of it - very impressive. It ended up miles away near the River Nene and it was a long time before anyone could catch it.
 

shearerlad

Member
Livestock Farmer
I remember many years ago when we lived in Northamptonshire, a Limousin bullock escaped from Northampton market. It sailed over hedges and ditches across our land and our neighbour’s with an ability that any steeplechaser would have been proud of. I’ll never forget the sight of it - very impressive. It ended up miles away near the River Nene and it was a long time before anyone could catch it.
Not meaning to pick on you @Cowgirl but thought the wild limmy stories would start......

I remember being in UA Huntingtower at a breeding sale, Galloway cow through, cleared the ring and ring side seats and spent the next 10 minutes turning round pivoting on her back legs, pawing and bellowing, snotters flying, sale kept going and 4 other cows were put through before she would follow one out.
Don’t know what happened to her but hanging from her hamstrings should of been the outcome
 

Hilly

Member
Maybe that's the way you're seeing it. It isn't what I intended.
I don't know where we can take this.

I haven't trawled through the whole post - I'm wholly unexcited by a lim making £250k.
It doesn't prove 'lims are best' any more than a £50k blackie tup proves blackies are best.
(which has given rise to the whole hokum idea that you measure a blackie tup by how much you paid for it...when some of the best I've had were feral unmarked strays bred by forest pixies on the hill. sometimes a bottle of scotch might be sent to the presumed breeder!)

If anything, I suspect there's a cross pollination going on between subsidised farmers spending their subs feeding loss making beasts -whilst pretending to themselves that they're in profit, and a 'wannabe in the top dollar club' investment scheme.
As we've already identified, lims don't tend to proliferate where there's no direct subs.
that alone probably says more than I can.

I think I also pointed out, several days ago, that if the 'best' in the country is only worth £250k, then the job is evidently bollixed.

Good luck with em.
My father grew up with Galloways tied up in a byre 6 months of the year let out twice day for a drink and the ones with most milk milked twice a day , quiet as lambs he didn’t know until he was about 40 that a Galloway could be naughty !
 

Cowgirl

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Ayrshire
Not meaning to pick on you @Cowgirl but thought the wild limmy stories would start......

I remember being in UA Huntingtower at a breeding sale, Galloway cow through, cleared the ring and ring side seats and spent the next 10 minutes turning round pivoting on her back legs, pawing and bellowing, snotters flying, sale kept going and 4 other cows were put through before she would follow one out.
Don’t know what happened to her but hanging from her hamstrings should of been the outcome
Oh I know all cattle can jump (even ours if motivated enough), but it was the phenomenal jumping style of this beast that sticks in my memory. I’m really surprised someone hasn’t thought of racing them! There must be money to be made surely? A bit like the Brahman bucking bulls in rodeos in the States. I suppose the animal rights people would be horrified.. Just my imagination running riot tonight!
 
Why not they actually make a very good cross , the worst cross known to man kind is Limmy and Angus , but Limmy Galloway make some good cattle if handled right to keep the temper down.
I vet friend who was involved in the FMD cull said the wildest cattle her team had to deal with were Lim x Galloway, she said they were like deer, and culling them ended up being a sniper job.
 

Hilly

Member
I vet friend who was involved in the FMD cull said the wildest cattle her team had to deal with were Lim x Galloway, she said they were like deer, and culling them ended up being a sniper job.
I could imagine if handled wrong that would be the out come , in the right hands be fine , a member on here had a pic of some a while ago very good , very shapely a Galloway .
 

sheepwise

Member
Location
SW Scotland
I find it interesting and surprising that some farmers these days won’t go in with cows to bed them down unless they’re all in head yokes. I wonder how much the reduced handling due to the feeder wagon, straw blower etc have had on the flightiness of cattle.
A lot.
We walk through our store cattle and feeding cattle on the slats every day to check them and tip the water troughs at the back of the pens. It is amazing how quite they become, many lying down don't even bother to get up out your way. Straw bedders have a lot to answer for in terms of cattle docility.
Will buy most breeds of store cattle and have to say the temperament of the limousin breed has improved tremendously over the years but like all breeds you still get the occasional nutter. If you go to store sales you often find the same farms have flighty cattle on a regular basis irrespective of breed.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
I remember many years ago when we lived in Northamptonshire, a Limousin bullock escaped from Northampton market. It sailed over hedges and ditches across our land and our neighbour’s with an ability that any steeplechaser would have been proud of. I’ll never forget the sight of it - very impressive. It ended up miles away near the River Nene and it was a long time before anyone could catch it.

To be fair, many years ago, back in Gloucestershire, we had a call from a local dealer who had been chasing 2 Charolais bullocks that had gone over the wall of his yard...... 8 miles away. They ended up going through the railway (mainline from Birmingham to London) fence from our fields, then heading North on the track. They were headed off in the local station, were the went over the fences into dense undergrowth. One broke it's leg doing so, and the other was shot soon after iirc.

They come in all breeds............... just more often in Limmy's. ;)
 
A lot.
We walk through our store cattle and feeding cattle on the slats every day to check them and tip the water troughs at the back of the pens. It is amazing how quite they become, many lying down don't even bother to get up out your way. Straw bedders have a lot to answer for in terms of cattle docility.
Will buy most breeds of store cattle and have to say the temperament of the limousin breed has improved tremendously over the years but like all breeds you still get the occasional nutter. If you go to store sales you often find the same farms have flighty cattle on a regular basis irrespective of breed.
Why do you say straw bedder have a lot to answer for? I don't disagree, but don't slats have equally as much?
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
On that same farm in Gloucestershire, we occasionally used a Limmy on the dairy cows. Not often as the calves usually went over term, got too big/hard calving, and never sold anywhere near as well as a BB.
If I went into a pen with a newborn calf to spray it's navel, most breeds would quietly sit there while you walked up to it, lifted a leg/rolled it on it's back, and sprayed it's navel with Iodine. Almost every Lim, bred from the same dairy cows, would jump up as you opened the door, bellow, and sprint at the wall to try and scale it. They were, almost without exception, nutters born. That behaviour, at such a young age, is inherent and nothing whatsoever to do with learned behaviour from handling!

For the record, we also used a few Salers on heifers, which were incredibly easy calking and very much more placid.
 

egbert

Member
My father grew up with Galloways tied up in a byre 6 months of the year let out twice day for a drink and the ones with most milk milked twice a day , quiet as lambs he didn’t know until he was about 40 that a Galloway could be naughty !
An old fashioned sort local here turned up with 50 Galloway and south Devon steers at the mart - walking them down the road. I was despatched help him number them in the pens rather than put em through the chute. And they were all dead quiet. 'Well' he said, 'us've had em chained in the shippons* all winter' (*byres)
 

Hilly

Member
An old fashioned sort local here turned up with 50 Galloway and south Devon steers at the mart - walking them down the road. I was despatched help him number them in the pens rather than put em through the chute. And they were all dead quiet. 'Well' he said, 'us've had em chained in the shippons* all winter' (*byres)
Great, byre lovely place to be , but for hundreds on your own 😂
 

Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

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Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

Written by Lisa Applin

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In July, we opened the applications window for farmers to join our Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot.

The Sustainable Farming Incentive is 1 of the 3 new environmental land management schemes. It sits alongside the future Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery schemes.

Through the Sustainable Farming Incentive, farmers will be paid for environmentally sustainable actions – ones that are simple to do and do not require previous agri-environment scheme experience.

We are piloting the scheme to...
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