250,000 heifer

sheepwise

Member
Location
SW Scotland
looks a good heifer but doesn't look to extreme from what my dad took, maybe proper pictures add width🙊, eitherway I'd be proud to of bred itView attachment 937730
That's what I thought. All the posters knocking her as a poor beast need to get to a live prime sale and see that it's crossbred heifers of her type that the quality local butchers are buying for their discerning clientele every week. Doesn't look too extreme or difficult too put finish on to me.
 
Its a real credit to the limousin breed how theyve improved so much....they have great conformation now....15 or 20 years ago they all had hind quarters like an ang....i mean poor hind quarters!
But have they, when I worked with Lims at college 25 years ago I wouldn't have said they were poor shaped, the breed was awash with Cannon at that time and they didn't lack back end.

Big arses regularly come at a price of loin and more often locomotion which I see as having gone down hill, this to me is too much of a price to pay for a few top/silversides that butchers struggling to sell anyway.

I appreciate the suckled calf buyers will pay for backends while we are grading for Europe.
 

Farmer Keith

Member
Location
North Cumbria
There is a downside to all the “progress” that’s been made in terms of confirmation within the breed, 25 years ago every dairy farm going had a limo bull now I can only think of two local to me that still use one.

If i was breeding Limousins this would be a big concern to me given the continued contraction of the national suckler herd and the growth of dairy beef, of which nearly all will be either AA or BB. The most expensive stock should have reduced gestation lengths, improved calving ease and improved locomotion not double muscling as their best traits.... however this does not look good in the show ring and there lies the problem.
 
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neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
There is a downside to all the “progress” that’s been made in terms of confirmation with in the breed, 25 years ago every dairy farm going had a limo bull now I can’t only think of two local to me that still use one.

If i was breeding Limousins this would be a big concern to me given the continued contraction of the national suckler herd and the growth of dairy beef, of which nearly all will be either AA or BB. The most expensive stock should have reduced gestation lengths, improved calving ease and improved locomotion not double muscling as their best traits.... however this does not look good in the show ring and there lies the problem.

I’m not so sure. What better time to admire the width across a calf’s hips, as when you’re pulling it out with a calving jack? If it lives afterwards it’s a bonus of course....🤐
 

Henarar

Member
Livestock Farmer
There is a downside to all the “progress” that’s been made in terms of confirmation with in the breed, 25 years ago every dairy farm going had a limo bull now I can’t only think of two local to me that still use one.

If i was breeding Limousins this would be a big concern to me given the continued contraction of the national suckler herd and the growth of dairy beef, of which nearly all will be either AA or BB. The most expensive stock should have reduced gestation lengths, improved calving ease and improved locomotion not double muscling as their best traits.... however this does not look good in the show ring and there lies the problem.
Are they any more productive in a commercial suckler herd anyway,
Talking to a friend who is a limmy breeder with a commercial herd they have a Q bull and one that isnt and while the Q bulls calves will look better when born the others will make just as much with less trouble.
From what I could gather this wasn't a comparison between just two bulls either but experience over the years with several different bulls.
 
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Agrivator

Member
A heifer's shape (apart from head, legs and feet) isn't a very good guide to its breeding value.

Otherwise, livestock breeding would be a doodle.
 
A heifer's shape (apart from head, legs and feet) isn't a very good guide to its breeding value.

Otherwise, livestock breeding would be a doodle.
I'm all for a doodle
20210131_124837.jpg
 

Agrivator

Member
That's due to the our European grading, globally they aren't popular though.

All the quality butchers in the Borders, at least those not in a specific breed scheme, prefer Limousin crosses.

But until 1990, Limousin crosses were only known in Northern England. So to conquer the Scottish market over the last 25 years, shows how superior they are.

And there is no sign of their demise.
 

New report underlines need for joined-up action to protect rivers

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New report underlines need for joined-up action to protect rivers

Written by Defra Press Office

A wide river is in view in a valley in the background, a drystone wall is behind the river, and large, green trees are prominent in the scene.


The Rivers Trust has today launched its State of Our Rivers report aiming to allow the English public understand and explore the health of their rivers on a national and local scale.

Environment Minister Rebecca Pow and Environment Agency Director John Leyland attended the launch panel to discuss the ways in which the...
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