4 day week

toquark

Member
I don't really see a problem with it to be honest.

The 5 day week was centered around the production line which doesn't really exist to any great extent anymore in this country. Offering people more time off could free them up to work elsewhere or set up businesses on the side thus increasing national production and individual wealth. If companies can afford it then why not? Sure there will be many who choose to have a 3 day weekend but good luck to them.

The average British worker is amongst the least productive in the world's advanced economies, I'd wager that a part of that is down to people being forced to sit idly in 40 hour/week jobs which could be done in half the time. A lot of jobs have seen a great many of their functions whittled away through the years mainly due to technological advances. What's the point in making these advances if we as a society cannot enjoy the spoils of them?

Obviously it wouldn't suit every job or business but the fact is employees want (and in many cases need) flexibility nowadays, and employers are having to think outside the box in order to attract and retain staff in a market which currently is heavily skewed in favour of the employee.
 
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BrianV

Member
Livestock Farmer
I don't really see a problem with it to be honest.

The 5 day week was centered around the production line which doesn't really exist to any great extent anymore in this country. Offering people more time off could free them up to work elsewhere or set up businesses on the side thus increasing national production and individual wealth. If companies can afford it then why not? Sure there will be many who choose to have a 3 day weekend but good luck to them.

The average British worker is amongst the least productive in the world's advanced economies, I'd wager that a part of that is down to people being forced to sit idly in 40 hour/week jobs which could be done in half the time. A lot of jobs have seen a great many of their functions whittled away through the years mainly due to technological advances. What's the point in making these advances if we as a society cannot enjoy the spoils of them?

Obviously it wouldn't suit every job or business but the fact is employees want (and in many cases need) flexibility nowadays, and employers are having to think outside the box in order to attract and retain staff in a market which currently is heavily skewed in favour of the employee.
If as you say the average UK worker is the least productive in the world would not carrying on with that level of work ethic for just 4 days make them even less productive if they were still receiving the same pay, why would anyone in their right mind think they will work 20% harder for the shorter 4 day week?
 

toquark

Member
If as you say the average UK worker is the least productive in the world would not carrying on with that level of work ethic for just 4 days make them even less productive if they were still receiving the same pay, why would anyone in their right mind think they will work 20% harder for the shorter 4 day week?
Its not always people's work ethic that's the issue, its the often jobs themselves which are unproductive.

I suspect that if many employees are honest with themselves, they could very easily get a lot more done in a day than they do, but what would be the point if they still have to come in tomorrow?
 

farmerm

Member
Location
Shropshire
Lets think about this for a moment... if private sector workers start doing 4 day weeks with no cut to pay then public sector and other key workers will expect the same... teachers on a 4 day week, police on a 4 day week, lorry drivers on a 4 day week, doctors on a 4 day week..... ok for some doctors that might be an increased workload and less golf but for the rest who is it proposed that 5 days work can fit into 4? bigger class sizes, even fewer officers on duty, 25% increase to the speed limit, euthanise the sick and elderly??
 

Ali_Maxxum

Member
Location
Chepstow, Wales
Other than people that work for big companies and office staff what industry is going to benefit from this? Office workers have already been deemed to be more productive with better morale the past 18 months due to working from home anyway. Not just productivity benefits but the environment, less cars needlessly on the road, etc.

Is my local tractor dealer going to benefit and work any more efficiently by only being open mon-thurs? Unless they want to take on more staff to be open on the Friday and saturday morning? Might suit someone who only wants part time work? Would others have to implement something like a 4 on, 4 off kinda thing?

It's like trying to get blood from a stone to get a lot of people to do anything these days anyway, so many firms and organizations spend so much time pis$ing about as it is, what makes anyone think they're going to be any better with an extra day off?

I'm glad I enjoy my work and luckyily quite often don't really see it as 'just work' that the scheme doesn't interest me one bit.
 

PSQ

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Scottish Borders
Does it mean we only have to put up with Nicola blaming England for all Scotland’s ills for 24 4 instead of 24 7? If so, I’m in - very little helps.

She's like the Duracell bunny, she never stops.
[More like a 'Rampant Rabbit', that wont stop until it's completely ****** the country ]

Back on thread, a 4 day week might be fine for public sector workers and those 'working in Non Jobs' like MSP's at Holyrood. Fireman, retire early on well funded public sector pension. Police too. Teachers, council workers, and the rest of the 20% Scottish public sector; reduced hours all paid from the existing government pot, and more nurses to cover shifts.

But where does it leave the self employed? The brickies, plumbers, hauliers, farmers / farm workers etc etc? Does it mean having 3 days overtime a week at harvest instead of 2? Does it mean delivery drivers having to squeeze extra hours in to the driving day? More taxes to pay for all the 'free' prescriptions and free university education at St Andrews for the sons and daughters of Scotlands wealthiest?

What it does mean is Nicola standing to one side while Patrick Harvie fulfils his promise to stop "the endless cycle of economic growth", as Scotland is sent back into the old cycle of increasing poverty and failing private industry, as more companies decide that it's not worth considering Scotland as an affordable place to start or continue their business.
 

BrianV

Member
Livestock Farmer
She's like the Duracell bunny, she never stops.
[More like a 'Rampant Rabbit', that wont stop until it's completely ****** the country ]

Back on thread, a 4 day week might be fine for public sector workers and those 'working in Non Jobs' like MSP's at Holyrood. Fireman, retire early on well funded public sector pension. Police too. Teachers, council workers, and the rest of the 20% Scottish public sector; reduced hours all paid from the existing government pot, and more nurses to cover shifts.

But where does it leave the self employed? The brickies, plumbers, hauliers, farmers / farm workers etc etc? Does it mean having 3 days overtime a week at harvest instead of 2? Does it mean delivery drivers having to squeeze extra hours in to the driving day? More taxes to pay for all the 'free' prescriptions and free university education at St Andrews for the sons and daughters of Scotlands wealthiest?

What it does mean is Nicola standing to one side while Patrick Harvie fulfils his promise to stop "the endless cycle of economic growth", as Scotland is sent back into the old cycle of increasing poverty and failing private industry, as more companies decide that it's not worth considering Scotland as an affordable place to start or continue their business.
How the Chinese must be wetting themselves with laughter!
 

Forkdriver

Member
Livestock Farmer
And who does the work on the fifth day some guy whose only working one day a week?
If the work has been done, no one. There is a problem with people being present but not actually doing anything on long hours, that could have been completed more quickly. When I worked in an office one chap left a jacket on the back of his chair. To anyone not in the know, he was present.
 

Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

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Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

Written by Lisa Applin

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In July, we opened the applications window for farmers to join our Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot.

The Sustainable Farming Incentive is 1 of the 3 new environmental land management schemes. It sits alongside the future Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery schemes.

Through the Sustainable Farming Incentive, farmers will be paid for environmentally sustainable actions – ones that are simple to do and do not require previous agri-environment scheme experience.

We are piloting the scheme to...
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