50 years ago

I am sure there will be someone here that stopped their grey fergi or major or Nuffield or even allis charmers or E27N to watch the moon landing
 
I am sure there will be someone here that stopped their grey fergi or major or Nuffield or even allis charmers or E27N to watch the moon landing
I think the newest tractor my father would have had then (farming in the Fens) was a Massey 165. We also had a couple of 135's and 2 175's. We also still had a couple of Fordson Majors and a grey Fergi. A Track Marshal with a Turner linkage did most of the ploughing and we also had a Roadless Major Crawler, called buttercup, because it was painted yellow.
We had 2 Ransomes TS 82 ploughs for when we did plough with wheeled tractors (with Lambourn cabs!).
The combine was a Claas SF and we were about to upgrade to a Clayson M140. But cereals were a break crop from growing all the veg and sugar beet. All delivered using a Bedford TK artic with Scammel hitch and single axle trailers carrying 10 tonnes at a time. The beet was washed off the trailers at Ely Sugar Beet factory, as they did not tip.

There was no such thing as Rough Terrain Forklift, so we built our own out of an old lorry in the farm workshop. Tandem axle trailers were unheard of. As were Power-harrows. Seed and fertilisers came in 112lb sacks and spraying was done in pints and gallons/acre.

There was still such a thing as a 10 shilling note! Sixpence bought you a bag of chips that fed at least 2 people.
 
I think the newest tractor my father would have had then (farming in the Fens) was a Massey 165. We also had a couple of 135's and 2 175's. We also still had a couple of Fordson Majors and a grey Fergi. A Track Marshal with a Turner linkage did most of the ploughing and we also had a Roadless Major Crawler, called buttercup, because it was painted yellow.
We had 2 Ransomes TS 82 ploughs for when we did plough with wheeled tractors (with Lambourn cabs!).
The combine was a Claas SF and we were about to upgrade to a Clayson M140. But cereals were a break crop from growing all the veg and sugar beet. All delivered using a Bedford TK artic with Scammel hitch and single axle trailers carrying 10 tonnes at a time. The beet was washed off the trailers at Ely Sugar Beet factory, as they did not tip.

There was no such thing as Rough Terrain Forklift, so we built our own out of an old lorry in the farm workshop. Tandem axle trailers were unheard of. As were Power-harrows. Seed and fertilisers came in 112lb sacks and spraying was done in pints and gallons/acre.

There was still such a thing as a 10 shilling note! Sixpence bought you a bag of chips that fed at least 2 people.
were did it all go wrong, we were all much happier then
 
Your washing machine has more computer processing power than the moon lander!

No joke
In 1969, when Apollo 11 landed on the moon, NASA had more computer power than had existed in the world 10 years earlier.
In 1978, BMW launched a car that had more computer power on it than existed in the world in 1969.
In 1986, Massey Ferguson launched the 3000 series Datatronic tractors that had more computer power on them than existed in the world in 1978.

Windows computers hadn’t even been invented by then.
 
In 1969, when Apollo 11 landed on the moon, NASA had more computer power than had existed in the world 10 years earlier.
In 1978, BMW launched a car that had more computer power on it than existed in the world in 1969.
In 1986, Massey Ferguson launched the 3000 series Datatronic tractors that had more computer power on them than existed in the world in 1978.

Windows computers hadn’t even been invented by then.
Even link box has 3 rams on it these days?
 
We had a brand new 135 delivered in mid april 1969 . It was a Thursday and our secondary school got a new headmaster that day.His first anouncement to the school assembly was to give us all the Thursday afternoon off so I got home to see the 135 delivered by lorry.We still had two tractormen and they gave me the first shot of it pulling the tiniest set of triple rollers you have ever seen and picking off stones off emerging spring barley. Think it might have been the stone picking that swung it.
We still have the 135 and still sows the swedes every year.It was restored for its fortieth birthday. Picture shows it at local show at end of July.
20170729_121823.jpg
 

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109: Monitor Farm takeover

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109: Monitor Farm takeover

Written by AHDB

The first episode in the Farm Excellence series of the AHDB podcast focuses on cereals & oilseeds. The Monitor Farm programme comprises a network of farmers from across the UK and Northern Ireland committed to driving innovation and best practice. They host regular meetings at their farms in which they discuss issues facing agriculture in their...
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