50 years ago

Nearly

Member
Location
North of York
Actually it was all arranged byJFK as he knew that day, was one of those days that should be celebrated for ever by mankind.
Thankfully he did not live to see how this critical event was overshadowed by the celebrations.
So while a very grateful Exfarmer still thanks him to this day , for the firework show, the rest of the world has forgotten, except for my facebook friends of course, and even a couple of members of my family, that this was all arranged to alert the world, I had come of age;)
Ditto but my age was 5 months.
 

Lazy Sod

Member
Location
Warminster
In 1969, we had Ford 4000, 3000 and an old David Brown 900 for scraper duties plus a MF 788 combine which I would have been driving at the time. I also ran the drier during the evenings as my father, then in his late sixties, would have had enough for the day. Being somewhat sleep deprived, the moon landing somewhat passed me by.

Incidently, the two Fords and the 788 were all bought new in 1967. I've thought for many years that we were much better off in those days, although it didn't seem like it back then.
 
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bumkin

Member
Location
pembrokeshire
i had a fergi 35 a two furrow 10 inch plow a set of harrows and an albion seed drill no fork lift grain in sacks firt in sacks small bales and a pitch fork milked cows into buckets (no pipe line) fed corn out of a barrow with a scoop ;) used to muck out with a fork and a shovel into a wheel barrow and push it up a plank , dream on all you young uns with power steering radios and air con
 
Location
southwest
i had a fergi 35 a two furrow 10 inch plow a set of harrows and an albion seed drill no fork lift grain in sacks firt in sacks small bales and a pitch fork milked cows into buckets (no pipe line) fed corn out of a barrow with a scoop ;) used to muck out with a fork and a shovel into a wheel barrow and push it up a plank , dream on all you young uns with power steering radios and air con
Yeah, I remember. A bale loader was a two prong fork, a loader was a chap from the village who would help picking up bales in the evenings,a tipping trailer had a crank handle you had to turn, a download was what you got if the bales fell off the trailer, a parlour was where you had your tea when you had visitors, the net was what mum put on her hair and email was what the postman delivered in Yorkshire!

If you had a cow with the confirmation of a modern holstein, you'd call the vet (or hide it away)
 
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When those Yanks were landing on the moon I was on a school trip to Spain aged almost 17. We watched the landing along with about 50 other people crowded round a little black and white telly in a little kiosk on the nice bit of a beach near Alicante on the Med.
(Has to be something quite memorable for the old brain to put actual dates to places and events that long ago.)
As far as farming, we milked about 30 cows, 1/2 were Jerseys, bottled and delivered locally about 30 gallons of milk (yes honestly, before school). Made hay with a Dexta and TEF Fergy, last year with the Wartime Case 7ft pull type finger mower and a Jones baler. Carting bales after school with anybody from the village who could be conned to help - for a packet of fags! Also grew about 7 acres of potatoes, mostly sold at the gate ‘cos the tax man could never know exactly how many we sold?
Life was not easy, but I was young, no worries, no debt and didn’t know a different way.
How life changes.
 

bumkin

Member
Location
pembrokeshire
what about all that wonderful machinery hay rakes do you remember them siting on an iron seat and rattling along over the bumpy bits these days no one seems to be bothered they have left anything behind and we had a lister blackstone turner lose one of those tines and find it with the baler :banghead: most of our machines were converted horse machinery
 

TheTallGuy

Member
Location
Cambridgeshire
And yet they went all that way ???

Odd no ones ever been back
Six of the Apollo missions landed 12 astronauts on the moon. The original programme of landings were undertaken at huge expense & it was felt that there was little else to be achieved by further manned flights. The modern approach is to use autonomous vehicles for space exploration as this represents a far lower risk & costs are significantly lower due to not needing to provide life support for a bunch of meatbags.
 

Vizslaman

Member
Location
Hampshire
@Bumpkin My first memory of the farm was leading the horse around in circles to drive the elevator to put the hay to top of the rick. (I was about 5) There was a threshing machine driven by a flat belt of a TVO Fordson tractor. Hay rake as you described with big steel tines. We washed cows by hand and milked them into a bucket which was then emptied into the cooler before going into the churns. Oh and no bottled water you drank it straight from the hose pipe.
 

8100

Member
Location
South Cheshire
Not quite 50 yrs ago more 40 ish a little farm i helped out on was still using a seed drill or maybe a seed dropper which had metal wheels and little rotating dishes that a shaft with fingers flicked the seed or fert off .It was pulled by a diesel mf 20 or a canvased cab IH something 34 maybe a 434 ?Always got paid by potatoes :(.Do you remember Eric Bailey @bumkin next door to George Mason by Rhode Pool .
 

bumkin

Member
Location
pembrokeshire
Not quite 50 yrs ago more 40 ish a little farm i helped out on was still using a seed drill or maybe a seed dropper which had metal wheels and little rotating dishes that a shaft with fingers flicked the seed or fert off .It was pulled by a diesel mf 20 or a canvased cab IH something 34 maybe a 434 ?Always got paid by potatoes :(.Do you remember Eric Bailey @bumkin next door to George Mason by Rhode Pool .
yes i remember Erick Bailey :eek:and his brother Brian I used to do his ploughing and combining the first time i met Erick was in the seventies he was driving past on his t 20 with a fergi scufle on the back dressed in corduroy trousers and collarless shirt and flat cap he looked as if he had just come out of a time warp from the mid fifties he stopped had a chat and drove off this happened a few times over the years and i never knew who he was then one day i was ploughing for Brian and he came across the field for a chat and left i said to Brian who the feck is that? he said my brother:banghead: i dont think George Mason appreciated having him as a neighbour
 

bumkin

Member
Location
pembrokeshire
while we are talking about fifty years ago stop to think how life has changed in those fifty years especially country village life our local village was very urban with two factories and 12000 people but where my grandmother lived the sweet and paper shop was the front room of a terraced house so were the barber the byke shop the local hardware shop was a shed you know just like a chicken shed this was at the end of the terrace people used to cycle i don't mean the lycra clad sorts it was a form of transport there were characters i suppose these days you would say they had some disorder people would acknowledge each other and sometimes stop for a chat have a pint in the local pub and talk about harvest and other agricultural matters was it my imagination or was there some sort of order of life.
 

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Creamy, untreated and in a glass bottle: Britain gets a taste for old-fashioned milk

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Creamy, untreated and in a glass bottle: Britain gets a taste for old-fashioned milk

Written by Freya Herring

Dairy farmers cash in on a growing trend to replace both homogenisation and plastic with a revival of the traditional ways
“When the milk price crashed five years ago, we were in a bad...
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