Adding a new breed to a suckler herd

egbert

Member
How much Limousin has been put into the South Devon?
It was tried, openly and covertly, 30-40 years ago.
But since the breed already carries the double muscled gene - which is nothing but a pain in the backside- it never gained much traction.
Pedigrees are being DNA'ed for stuff nowadays, so it would quickly show up if it were done now.
As said above, the native double muscling can also be associated with things that don't grow....which is a bit daft since 'growing' is one of the breeds strongpoints.


Hi @Cowslip ....nice pics.
I'm currently working a 'Treguddick' polled bull, and have a strapping weaned calf in the shed from 'Pizwell', who apparently is zero for myostatin, and homozygous for polled.
 

Grahamc94

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Scotland
If you're not worried about pedigree, I'll keep you a polled bull calf off an outlying herd that live at 1000'.
Dopey old things that just get on with life. a dream to work with.
South Devon is definitely a breed I’m considering. Definitely need to be hardy as we out winter a lot of our calves until 8 weeks before selling them. Also out winter some of our in calf heifers so breeders need to be tough. Dairy bred replacements are kept inside during winter
 

choochter

Member
Location
aberdeenshire
We usually sell between 8 & 12 months. Last lot we sold had 16 angus 8-9 months average 385kg and 1 9 month old Hereford at 370kg
I dont sell at that age, but I've a few to sell shortly, they'll be about 14 months and ready for finishing. Will weigh them next week.
At birth calves in my herd about 40kgs, would be between 35 and 42kgs
Heifers calving at average of 27 months
 

Cowslip

Member
Mixed Farmer
It was tried, openly and covertly, 30-40 years ago.
But since the breed already carries the double muscled gene - which is nothing but a pain in the backside- it never gained much traction.
Pedigrees are being DNA'ed for stuff nowadays, so it would quickly show up if it were done now.
As said above, the native double muscling can also be associated with things that don't grow....which is a bit daft since 'growing' is one of the breeds strongpoints.


Hi @Cowslip ....nice pics.
I'm currently working a 'Treguddick' polled bull, and have a strapping weaned calf in the shed from 'Pizwell', who apparently is zero for myostatin, and homozygous for polled.
@egbert the bull in the photo is waddeton euclid purchased at the society sale in spring, I have been impressed how he has grown in his first year and how he looked the same condition when turned out as he did when housed in December only been on marsh grass and I ran him with 23 cows, 22 in calf and 2 with twins. When I purchased him my worry was he would melt and not grow but he has excedded all my expectations. Fingers crossed for a successful calving in a months time.
 

Cowslip

Member
Mixed Farmer
South Devon is definitely a breed I’m considering. Definitely need to be hardy as we out winter a lot of our calves until 8 weeks before selling them. Also out winter some of our in calf heifers so breeders need to be tough. Dairy bred replacements are kept inside during winter
Mine would prefer to stay outside but due to our grazing agreements with the rspb and wildlife Trust we bring them in last week of December and turnout as soon as calved in March. In calf heifers will be fine its keeping the weight off them thats the trouble. I am in the opposite side of the country but many breeders outwinter them.
 

egbert

Member
South Devon is definitely a breed I’m considering. Definitely need to be hardy as we out winter a lot of our calves until 8 weeks before selling them. Also out winter some of our in calf heifers so breeders need to be tough. Dairy bred replacements are kept inside during winter
Most of my SDs would be housed for their first winter as weanlings, then never come inside again.
100" of rain, grouped 17-18 adults to a round bale of moderate silage.
We usually fluke the cows -but not always- and that's the only meds most ever see.
Very seldom have much bother calving - although to be fair mine are seldom fat.
(same comment with feet)

They're just fantastic...the best kept secret in UK cattle farming!
you asked about how they sell.
Locally here, where they're very well known (Westcountry) they're always very sought after.
Elsewhere, if you're selling stores/calves, it's possible they might get pigeonholed with unusual natives.
(but size and growth aren't exactly bad selling points)
 

egbert

Member
@egbert the bull in the photo is waddeton euclid purchased at the society sale in spring, I have been impressed how he has grown in his first year and how he looked the same condition when turned out as he did when housed in December only been on marsh grass and I ran him with 23 cows, 22 in calf and 2 with twins. When I purchased him my worry was he would melt and not grow but he has excedded all my expectations. Fingers crossed for a successful calving in a months time.
not as lugubrious as some Waddeton stuff!
 

Grahamc94

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Scotland
Mine would prefer to stay outside but due to our grazing agreements with the rspb and wildlife Trust we bring them in last week of December and turnout as soon as calved in March. In calf heifers will be fine its keeping the weight off them thats the trouble. I am in the opposite side of the country but many breeders outwinter them.Most of my SDs would be housed for their first winter as weanlings, then never come inside again.
100" of rain, grouped 17-18 adults to a round bale of moderate silage.
We usually fluke the cows -but not always- and that's the only meds most ever see.
Very seldom have much bother calving - although to be fair mine are seldom fat.
(same comment with feet)

They're just fantastic...the best kept secret in UK cattle farming!
you asked about how they sell.
Locally here, where they're very well known (Westcountry) they're always very sought after.
Elsewhere, if you're selling stores/calves, it's possible they might get pigeonholed with unusual natives.
(but size and growth aren't exactly bad selling points)
We’re on the coast so we’re exposed to the elements. Keeping the weight off them when out wintering can be an issue as silage quality is good most years. Ones in the shed are restricted to 18-20kg/head/day of silage and oat straw fed through a Keenan.
 

Henarar

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Somerset
They're just fantastic...the best kept secret in UK cattle farming!
you asked about how they sell.
Locally here, where they're very well known (Westcountry) they're always very sought after.
Elsewhere, if you're selling stores/calves, it's possible they might get pigeonholed with unusual natives.
(but size and growth aren't exactly bad selling points)
Funny we are only just over the border in Somerset and hardly see any SD's
 
Last edited:

Weasel

Member
Location
in the hills
Most of my SDs would be housed for their first winter as weanlings, then never come inside again.
100" of rain, grouped 17-18 adults to a round bale of moderate silage.
We usually fluke the cows -but not always- and that's the only meds most ever see.
Very seldom have much bother calving - although to be fair mine are seldom fat.
(same comment with feet)

They're just fantastic...the best kept secret in UK cattle farming!
you asked about how they sell.
Locally here, where they're very well known (Westcountry) they're always very sought after.
Elsewhere, if you're selling stores/calves, it's possible they might get pigeonholed with unusual natives.
(but size and growth aren't exactly bad selling points)

Are you on about simmentals? 😂
 

Cowslip

Member
Mixed Farmer
not as lugubrious as some Waddeton stuff!
First animal i have had from that breeder, I wanted a homozygous bull and one with myostatin 1 feet was very important and easily fleshing, he ticked all the boxes. Just anxious to see how the cows calve to him now.
 

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