Advice - solution for bridging ditch for access

Discussion in 'Buildings & Infrastructure' started by MF35, Jan 8, 2017.

  1. MF35

    MF35 New Member

    Dear Forum members, I am trying to find the most cost effective solution to bridging a field ditch to facilitate access by vehicles under 3.5 tons realistically. Any practical recommendations appreciated ? One side is slightly higher than the other.

    Always admire the ingenuity and helpfulness on this site to find solutions.

    thanks.
     
  2. Kevtherev

    Kevtherev Member

    Location:
    Welshpool Powys
    Picture?
    Can you use concrete pipes and build up with hardcore on the low side??
     
    multi power likes this.
  3. bovrill

    bovrill Member

    Location:
    East Essex, UK
    I'm just about to do a similar job. I'm going to get a 20' length of 300mm twinwall pipe to put in the bottom (that'll be the expensive bit), then I've got some massive lumps of WW2 concrete I dug out of a mound last year which I'll lay at the edges, effectively as kerbs, bridging the ditch, then fill with any clay/dirt I've got to hand.
    I could put some crush concrete on the top, but it's from one field to another, so I don't think I'll bother.

    My ditch is 6'+ deep, and 10'+ across the top, and the lumps of concrete are I think the foundation edges of a Nissen hut, which I've broken up into lengths I can pick up with the loader, probably two to three tons each.
    I wouldn't calculate yours for 3.5t loading, go big, you won't regret it when you have to take something bigger in one day.
     
    Dry Rot likes this.
  4. mo!

    mo! Member

    Location:
    York
    As above, pipe it in with sloping sides of earth. We did it between two fields, I reckon it paid for itself in one year.
     
  5. Paul E

    Paul E Member

    Location:
    Sunny Yorkshire
    upload_2017-1-8_18-35-12.jpeg

    Well somebody had to say it !(y);)
     
  6. glasshouse

    glasshouse Member

    Location:
    lothians
    Temp or permanent?
     
  7. Turra farmer

    Turra farmer Member

    2 scrap I beams
     
  8. topless_matt

    topless_matt Member

    Twinwall of appropriate size for the catchment and ditch size. Then backfill with suitable material and top with type one. Twinwall will be the most costly part.
    Make sure you clean the ditch out properly first or the culvert will be in at the wrong depth when you do get the ditch cleaned.
     
  9. renewablejohn

    renewablejohn Member

    Location:
    lancs
    Shipping container flat
     
  10. Replacing similar here, could I use a concrete panel for the sides? Don't want too long a pipe in bottom of dyke??
     
  11. RobFZS

    RobFZS Member

    decent twinwall pipe, some nice stone to cover it and then a load of rubble, then whatever you need to level the top off, we have concrete sleepers over ours.
     
  12. Lincsman

    Lincsman Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    Better and cheaper to use a drymix in sandbags.
     
  13. Davey

    Davey Member

    Location:
    Derbyshire
    Could you bridge it with an old lorry trailer? Take the axles and gubbins off first and dig it into the bank either side and you'd be none the wiser.
     
  14. topless_matt

    topless_matt Member

    More hassle then its worth doing that really though
     
  15. Kingofgrass

    Kingofgrass Member

    Pipe then sleepers then 12ft and 13ft gate
     

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  16. Derky

    Derky Member

    Location:
    Bucks/oxon
    20ft flat rack shipping container.
     
  17. MF35

    MF35 New Member

    As ever, some excellent ideas and practical advice by way of response. Thanks to all for your contribution. Now need to decide the route subject to what I can find from the various potential shopping list items suggested.
     
  18. Bobthebuilder

    Bobthebuilder Member

    Location:
    northumberland
    What's your location? As I know a local farmer/ haulier of concrete pipes often has odd sizes going cheap
     
  19. MF35

    MF35 New Member

    Thank you for that. I am near Romsey in Hampshire.
     

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