An American trade deal? What will the effect be on British farming?

Of course, and they sell huge numbers of them.
I believe the U.S. has been your top trading partner for the last 200 years, after that little dis-agreement about taxes or something.
JLR sell about 70,000 units a year, across all marques and models. That's about a tenth of what Ford do on their F series alone, and about 15% of their (JLR's) global sales.
 
JLR sell about 70,000 units a year, across all marques and models. That's about a tenth of what Ford do on their F series alone, and about 15% of their (JLR's) global sales.
Not aware of numbers but see them everywhere.
British products are well regarded in the U.S.........British anything is well thought of here, surely this is the moment to build on that closeness..?

Lets' face it this country in large part is populated by decendents of the British Isles.
 
Not aware of numbers but see them everywhere.
British products are well regarded in the U.S.........British anything is well thought of here, surely this is the moment to build on that closeness..?

Lets' face it this country in large part is populated by decendents of the British Isles.
I agree Roger, it is a very close relationship, but how can the UK sell more to the US? The tariffs are trivially small and as far as I am aware there is no other trade barrier out there. Nothing political can materially make the sales any higher, can it? (Although a no deal Brexit would push us to WTO terms and raise the UK:USA tariff to 10%, as I understand it).
 

bobk

Member
Location
stafford
I agree Roger, it is a very close relationship, but how can the UK sell more to the US? The tariffs are trivially small and as far as I am aware there is no other trade barrier out there. Nothing political can materially make the sales any higher, can it? (Although a no deal Brexit would push us to WTO terms and raise the UK:USA tariff to 10%, as I understand it).
Are you sure it's 2.5% ? everyone was banging on about 10% if we went wto with Europe
 
Are you sure it's 2.5% ? everyone was banging on about 10% if we went wto with Europe
WTO is 10%. We are 2.5% for EU->USA exports at the moment (and 10% for the other direction). Looked at in isolation, that's a pretty good deal that the EU has negotiated, I'm sure you'd agree.

"European tariffs on U.S. vehicles entering the European market are 10 percent, compared to U.S. tariffs of 2.5 percent on vehicles imported in the U.S."

"Under WTO rules, after Brexit, cars would be taxed at 10% when they crossed the UK-EU border." (and WTO is the same for all borders, as I understand it).
 
Canada has had several trade deals with United States for softwood lumber mostly because they need our lumber. Privately a lot of US contractors will tell you that we have a much superior product. However, all these agreements have been fraught with accusations of unfair practises, by their lumber companies and associations, and court cases tying up millions of dollars of tax revenue for years at a time as they will appeal any decision that does not go in their favour.
2w3wsaq
As we have witnessed over here when we renewed the Free Trade Agreement between our two countries Mr. Trump is anything. He will resort to most any lengths to get what he wants. reminded me much of the spoiled brat you see in the market throwing a tantrum because mom's said no. His favourite ruse is to sanction and restrict current trade in an effort to get a deal that is favourable to him. He also seems to think that it is a good move to treat trading partners the same as he treats North Korea, starve them into submission, so to speak.
 
Although I do not follow things closely I seem to remember that it was different rates for different types of vehicles, pickups seems were at 25% tariff while regular auto's were 10%.
I think the push will be for President Trump and Prime Minister Johnson to work on a tariff free agreement if at all possible............after all, in the end its' the customer who pays' the tariff bill.
 
Canada has had several trade deals with United States for softwood lumber mostly because they need our lumber. Privately a lot of US contractors will tell you that we have a much superior product. However, all these agreements have been fraught with accusations of unfair practises, by their lumber companies and associations, and court cases tying up millions of dollars of tax revenue for years at a time as they will appeal any decision that does not go in their favour.
2w3wsaq
As we have witnessed over here when we renewed the Free Trade Agreement between our two countries Mr. Trump is anything. He will resort to most any lengths to get what he wants. reminded me much of the spoiled brat you see in the market throwing a tantrum because mom's said no. His favourite ruse is to sanction and restrict current trade in an effort to get a deal that is favourable to him. He also seems to think that it is a good move to treat trading partners the same as he treats North Korea, starve them into submission, so to speak.
How will the new trade deal USMCA help you guys' is it regarded as a positive move..?
 
Although I do not follow things closely I seem to remember that it was different rates for different types of vehicles, pickups seems were at 25% tariff while regular auto's were 10%.
I think the push will be for President Trump and Prime Minister Johnson to work on a tariff free agreement if at all possible............after all, in the end its' the customer who pays' the tariff bill.
Regular autos are 2.5%, trucks are higher. I can't imagine that this influences many purchases and wouldn't think that trade would increase much if it was reduced to zero.
 

Blaithin

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Alberta, Canada
What’s worth thinking about is that currently our beef price is low and currently theirs is high so when things settle the gap will appear bigger
Beef is not high, either here or in America. Rough years, drought, flood, storms, a flooded dairy market.... all have aligned to low prices.

Not historic lows by any means but they aren’t high.
 
Beef is not high, either here or in America. Rough years, drought, flood, storms, a flooded dairy market.... all have aligned to low prices.

Not historic lows by any means but they aren’t high.
Ok then so America’s price is normal and ours is low, it still means that when ours re aligns itself the gap will be bigger. Unfortunately.
 

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Industry-wide ruminant group to tackle endemic diseases across the UK

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Written by John Swire

A new UK-wide cattle and sheep industry group is to be created to speed up progress against endemic diseases and reputational challenges which are costing the cattle and sheep sectors at least £500 million per year.

An industry consultation* on creating the new group had a strong majority supporting the move in principle, with many believing it will accelerate work to...
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