An easy tractor to rip apart and put back together

daveydiesel1

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co antrim
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How about this. Isnt pretty but is in budget (kinda) and once he had it all sorted would be worth money or have a handy tractor for wee jobs and scootin about plus very frugal
 
When my cousin was training to be a fitter at the Ford HQ there was a showroom of old models. One night,Six of the lads took a dexta apart,carried it all down the stairs to a cellar and put it back together. Left it running for when everyone came to work next day
 

e3120

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Northumberland
For value and simplicity I'd suggest a Doncaster built IH 574, 674, 585 etc. View attachment 1009381
Good suggestion, as more or less guaranteed to need the handbrake done, which will facilitate learning about the fuel tank, top cover and pto pack along the way.

He could try and do it 'keyhole' which likely would provide a long-lasting life lesson.

Piston/liner/o ring change is quite pleasant as everything is at a nice height. Tappets not obscured by modern garb.
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
I would definitely go for the smallest tractor you can find as they are so much easier to work on when you don't need a gantry to move things about.
I cut my teeth on a DB 770 but the hydraulics are very technical. However manuals are available on line and if he can fix those he deserves a place in any workshop. No I never did get to fix them. :(
 
When my cousin was training to be a fitter at the Ford HQ there was a showroom of old models. One night,Six of the lads took a dexta apart,carried it all down the stairs to a cellar and put it back together. Left it running for when everyone came to work next day
That story has been about for years with variations. It was also said that a working tractor was split at night by torchlight, the clutch plate removed & put in the lecturers desk before being put back together.
 

fermerboy

Member
Location
Banffshire
Good suggestion, as more or less guaranteed to need the handbrake done, which will facilitate learning about the fuel tank, top cover and pto pack along the way.

He could try and do it 'keyhole' which likely would provide a long-lasting life lesson.
And scars on his fingers from trying to get the split pin out, and scars on his arm from the casting while his arm is wedged in the porthole......
 

Pennine Ploughing

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
North Cumbria
I'd suggest getting one of the collectables. Then the lad can sell it when he's got it running right, make a profit, and move on to the next. Let some other mud do the final painting and polishing! ;)
How very wrong you are on this, for it to be making more money than a run of the mill tractor, it has to be a very good restoration, this means more is needed to be spent to get it right, or if its good to start with, then it will be top dollar
 
That story has been about for years with variations. It was also said that a working tractor was split at night by torchlight, the clutch plate removed & put in the lecturers desk before being put back together.
I'll say it wasn't the first or last time it had been done. His best mate on the course was an Irish bloke,built like a brick sh!those and he carried the engine down by himself.
 

Mur Huwcun

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North West Wales
Good suggestion, as more or less guaranteed to need the handbrake done, which will facilitate learning about the fuel tank, top cover and pto pack along the way.

He could try and do it 'keyhole' which likely would provide a long-lasting life lesson.

Piston/liner/o ring change is quite pleasant as everything is at a nice height. Tappets not obscured by modern garb.
And then he could definitely decide once and for all that he never wants to be a mechanic after it takes him ages and pulls every hair on his head out trying to bleed the brakes and arguing with the balancer valve!!
 

e3120

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Northumberland
And then he could definitely decide once and for all that he never wants to be a mechanic after it takes him ages and pulls every hair on his head out trying to bleed the brakes and arguing with the balancer valve!!
As it happens, I've just given up trying to explain to dad why the severe slap in the rh pedal of the one he's working on is causing the lh pedal to go to the floor.
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
How very wrong you are on this, for it to be making more money than a run of the mill tractor, it has to be a very good restoration, this means more is needed to be spent to get it right, or if its good to start with, then it will be top dollar
I don't think you read my post properly! "Wise man buys things that increase in value", old Chinese proverb.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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