Another nail in to the coffin of UK agriculture?

thesilentone

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Cumbria
We need to spread out. The population of the SE is similar to Scotland and Wales combined. Everyone needs somewhere to live and all the demands that go with numbers of people.

Going back to me previous post, if we were to give every person a carbon footprint value, the SE would be far and away the greatest polluter, and so on.

Agriculture (in theory) should be the winner as everyone has to eat, and importing food also adds to emissions, unless of course we import everything and there is a nett gain over producing at home.

Importing to much affects National Security and woe betide being held to ransom by food and fuel suppliers.

As we now row our own canoe, and it gathers momentum, being independent with both food and fuel should become a national priority.

After decades of farming responding to what has been asked of us, and then being used as the whipping boy when needed, we have reached a point where we need a voice that is heard.

It's time to lead instead of following.
 

Humble Village Farmer

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Cb97ej
Exactly. A lot of these species were very very marginal.

Oliver Rackham History of British Countryside tells us what has gone extinct over the past couple of thousand years.

There is no "great extinction" thats nonsense. Besides if they want to pay me for more biodiversity I'm all ears but at the moment I have to get my income from the marketplace
They are paying for biodiversity by creating and maintaining the various schemes. They don't seem to understand the market though so these schemes are not attracting enough farmers
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
It does quietly admit that most of the loss occurred in the industrial revolution......

And why do they include a picture of a tropical forest being cleared? I can't think of any tropical forest in the UK....

It would have been more accurate to include photos of HS2 and a road scheme.
Packham apparently wants to establish a tropical rain forest at Balmoral and all of the Crown Estates as I understand it. :ROFLMAO:
Somehow 'tropical' and Balmoral don't seem to be an appropriate fit.

Why don't they mention the massive expansion of forest cover worldwide that has occurred since the last ice age? Or the even more massive deforestation that occurred as ice formed and spread, and even as ice completely melted and resulted in ocean heights hundreds of metres higher than currently?
Fact is, vegetation adapts to the prevailing conditions but cannot survive under ice or even under water, certainly not in the same form. Measuring from any particular point results in information that can be tailored to the commentator's particular aim and story.
 

Big Mr C

Member
I'm not saying that we don't need housing, but lets look closer where they're being built. The new development demolished a wood land that was planted 40 years ago. And the planed development will take out trees that were planted 5 years ago, that were planted with a goverment grant to make the area more green. Were right on the edge of Thetford Forest. Can't more green than there.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Corrected that for you Chris....

How can it not when the population is increasing? 😉
To maintain 1995 population level to 2050, never mind increasing it, at the current average birth rate would require inward migration of 1.2 million or 40,000 annually until 2025 [which is no longer happening], yet the number of old people, older than 65, will increase from 9 million in 1995 to 13 million, while those of working age who will largely finance and increasingly care for them will decline from 39 million in 2010 to 33 million in 2050. This decline in working age people has been accelerated greatly and put in stark perspective this year because rather than a net increase of migrants there has been a very steep outward migration [due to you know what] resulting in a shortage of labour that is effecting people's lived directly already, never mind 2050. The projections are somewhat flexible and seen, in the light of current circumstances, to be grossly over counting the numbers likely to be of working age and paying taxes in future. This is a potential disaster for our children and grandchildren's economic prospects and living standards going forward.
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
To maintain 1995 population level to 2050, never mind increasing it, at the current average birth rate would require inward migration of 1.2 million or 40,000 annually until 2025 [which is no longer happening], yet the number of old people, older than 65, will increase from 9 million in 1995 to 13 million, while those of working age who will largely finance and increasingly care for them will decline from 39 million in 2010 to 33 million in 2050. This decline in working age people has been accelerated greatly and put in stark perspective this year because rather than a net increase of migrants there has been a very steep outward migration [due to you know what] resulting in a shortage of labour that is effecting people's lived directly already, never mind 2050. The projections are somewhat flexible and seen, in the light of current circumstances, to be grossly over counting the numbers likely to be of working age and paying taxes in future. This is a potential disaster for our children and grandchildren's economic prospects and living standards going forward.
The populations of many countries is going to be halved by 2100
 

robs1

Member
To maintain 1995 population level to 2050, never mind increasing it, at the current average birth rate would require inward migration of 1.2 million or 40,000 annually until 2025 [which is no longer happening], yet the number of old people, older than 65, will increase from 9 million in 1995 to 13 million, while those of working age who will largely finance and increasingly care for them will decline from 39 million in 2010 to 33 million in 2050. This decline in working age people has been accelerated greatly and put in stark perspective this year because rather than a net increase of migrants there has been a very steep outward migration [due to you know what] resulting in a shortage of labour that is effecting people's lived directly already, never mind 2050. The projections are somewhat flexible and seen, in the light of current circumstances, to be grossly over counting the numbers likely to be of working age and paying taxes in future. This is a potential disaster for our children and grandchildren's economic prospects and living standards going forward.
The last figures I have seen there is still a large net migration into the uk, where are you getting the figures you claim from ?
 

thesilentone

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Cumbria
The populations of many countries is going to be halved by 2100


Say's who ?

 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Say's who ?

Says I. Not sure about halved but significantly lower than today apart from Africa. By 2100 even Asia and India re forecast to have declining population. The world population will continue to rise for probably the next 40 years or so only due to those already born up to ten years ago, not because there are more people being born than dying. Africa is unfortunately forecast to continue to grow their population until they stop killing each other and start universally educating women and actually producing wealth, so that their health and welfare, particularly child mortality rates improve. Then, as in all other developed and fast developing areas, birth rates will fall to achieve just about a population balance.
European birthrates are currently and generally well below that needed to maintain a long term stable population, let alone a growing one.
 
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Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales

thesilentone

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Cumbria
Says I. Not sure about halved but significantly lower than today apart from Africa. By 2100 even Asia and India re forecast to have declining population. The world population will continue to rise for probably the next 40 years or so only due to those already born up to ten years ago, not because there are more people being born than dyeing. Africa is unfortunately forecast to continue to grow their population until they stop killing each other and start universally educating women and actually producing wealth, so that their health and welfare, particularly child mortality rates improve. Then, as in all other developed and fast developing areas, birth rates will fall to achieve just about a population balance.
European birthrates are currently and generally well below that needed to maintain a long term stable population, let alone a growing one.

Demographics are interesting, and now and again go against the flow. we periodically go through a demographic trough for many reasons. However, one thing is for certain, % growth rate may fall as it's divided by an ever increasing number, World migration will increase, as will World population, it's a mathematical certainty.

Unless you've got the next pandemic brewing in a bucket at home :ROFLMAO:
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Demographics are interesting, and now and again go against the flow. we periodically go through a demographic trough for many reasons. However, one thing is for certain, % growth rate may fall as it's divided by an ever increasing number, World migration will increase, as will World population, it's a mathematical certainty.

Unless you've got the next pandemic brewing in a bucket at home :ROFLMAO:
The mathematics is relatively simple and very interesting. Best illustrated by the late great Professor Hans Rosling.

 

Hilly

Member
We need to spread out. The population of the SE is similar to Scotland and Wales combined. Everyone needs somewhere to live and all the demands that go with numbers of people.

Going back to me previous post, if we were to give every person a carbon footprint value, the SE would be far and away the greatest polluter, and so on.

Agriculture (in theory) should be the winner as everyone has to eat, and importing food also adds to emissions, unless of course we import everything and there is a nett gain over producing at home.

Importing to much affects National Security and woe betide being held to ransom by food and fuel suppliers.

As we now row our own canoe, and it gathers momentum, being independent with both food and fuel should become a national priority.

After decades of farming responding to what has been asked of us, and then being used as the whipping boy when needed, we have reached a point where we need a voice that is heard.

It's time to lead instead of following.
It’s time the nfu was got rid of and new fresh Union .
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Here is the world's population distribution with forecast up until 2050 and beyond. Again explained in plain terms by Hans Rosling.
Note that Europe will have no significant population increase compared to ten years ago.

 

Is Red tractor detrimental to your mental health?

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

Farm-safety-640x360.png
The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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