Any crop worth drilling in June?

Charles Quick

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Somerset
I've got a field of poor linseed + multi-resistant wild oats. I'll be taking the nuclear option soon with 3 litres of glyphosate.
Of course it's a great opportunity to get a big cover crop in, but is there anything I can drill that might even come close to washing its face?
Would it be worth a try with Buckwheat or Sunflowers? Even just to multiply some cover crop seed?
Too late for maize?
Any thoughts appreciated
 
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Howdenshire Farmer

Member
BASE UK Member
I've got a field of poor linseed + multi-resistant wild oats. I'll be taking the nuclear option soon with 3 litres of glyphosate.
Of course it's a great opportunity to get a big cover crop in, but is there anything I can drill that might even come close to washing its face?
Would it be worth a try with Buckwheat or Sunflowers? Even just to multiply some cover crop seed?
Too late for maize?
Any thoughts appreciated
Drill with linseed again. Harvest next March/April. Follow with s barley. 2 crops in 1 year.
Now, where's that box I've been told about....
 

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
What herbicides have you applied so far? What soil type is it?

I agree with @SilliamWhale - stubble turnips sown now would give you a quick catch crop and the Golden Hoof will sort a lot of the weeds. Your local agents will be able to find a grazier for you. Can you get water to it?
 

Clive

Staff Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Lichfield
I've got a field of poor linseed + multi-resistant wild oats. I'll be taking the nuclear option soon with 3 litres of glyphosate.
Of course it's a great opportunity to get a big cover crop in, but is there anything I can drill that might even come close to washing its face?
Would it be worth a try with Buckwheat or Sunflowers? Even just to multiply some cover crop seed?
Too late for maize?
Any thoughts appreciated
cover crop - did this after failed soya a few years ago and have had my investment back many times over in better following crops
 

Charles Quick

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Somerset
Avadex, Maya, Falcon were applied so should be able to get most things established, doubt there's much Avadex left now.
Light loamy sand, dry, slightly acidic and it's due lime this autumn.
The field was in a 7 way cover crop which was grazed before the linseed.
Ideally I'd like to get it back into wheat this autumn and then attack with different chemistry, e.g. Monolith / spring atlantis but it does feel unwise going straight back to a problem crop.

A cover of Sunflowers/buckwheat/peas/W barley is tempting as I have the seed in stock
 
Avadex, Maya, Falcon were applied so should be able to get most things established, doubt there's much Avadex left now.
Light loamy sand, dry, slightly acidic and it's due lime this autumn.
The field was in a 7 way cover crop which was grazed before the linseed.
Ideally I'd like to get it back into wheat this autumn and then attack with different chemistry, e.g. Monolith / spring atlantis but it does feel unwise going straight back to a problem crop.

A cover of Sunflowers/buckwheat/peas/W barley is tempting as I have the seed in stock
MAIZE.

Hope it rains mind, could be late to harvest.

Cover crop would be my preferred option.
 

silverfox

Member
Location
Shropshire
MAIZE.

Hope it rains mind, could be late to harvest.

Cover crop would be my preferred option.
Catch crop would be much better. Fatten some lambs or have tack sheep. Actually make a bit of money out of it.
I was reading a recent copy of Arable farmer , where a progressive farmer was saying cover crops weren’t all they are cracked up to be .
 
Catch crop would be much better. Fatten some lambs or have tack sheep. Actually make a bit of money out of it.
I was reading a recent copy of Arable farmer , where a progressive farmer was saying cover crops weren’t all they are cracked up to be .
I view them as the same thing really, if you can graze a cover crop with sheep or cattle so much the better but anything is better than nothing.
 

Charles Quick

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Somerset
Sunflowers (with buckwheat and sorghum in the bottom) looking spectacular so it's time to start farming people!
Currently reached 170k impressions organically on Facebook, £5 entry for photos and 6 stems, all proceeds will be given to charity. Expecting it to bring in more than the linseed ever would have!
Brought the combine out too for a bit of farming education and as a comms mast for the card terminal
IMG_20200917_105151789.jpg
IMG_20200917_163737412.jpg
 
Sunflowers (with buckwheat and sorghum in the bottom) looking spectacular so it's time to start farming people!
Currently reached 170k impressions organically on Facebook, £5 entry for photos and 6 stems, all proceeds will be given to charity. Expecting it to bring in more than the linseed ever would have!
Brought the combine out too for a bit of farming education and as a comms mast for the card terminal
View attachment 908180View attachment 908181
Good idea. There's a few of these springing up.

Only saying the next sentence 'tongue in cheek', but the guy on the payment desk doesn't look too busy!

That said, some friends tried to book in for sunflower picking near us, and they'd totally sold out.
 

Charles Quick

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Somerset
Good idea. There's a few of these springing up.

Only saying the next sentence 'tongue in cheek', but the guy on the payment desk doesn't look too busy!

That said, some friends tried to book in for sunflower picking near us, and they'd totally sold out.
Been open 13 minutes.....
 

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Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
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