Any drainage experts on here

Location
Ceredigion
post war huge numbers were made at Stewartby until thew 1980's or a bit later. Lade thousands of the things, by hand, with the aid of a digger.
Gene rally being the smallest I was volunteered;)
I put a lot in behind my brother in the digger , but always the smooth ones not ribs,
Tile drains seem to run better than plastic over time , those drains still running quite strong
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
I put a lot in behind my brother in the digger , but always the smooth ones not ribs,
Tile drains seem to run better than plastic over time , those drains still running quite strong
Where we farmed in Buckinghamshire, the farm had been once a Victorian model farm. Sadly in the intervening years the whole drainage system been allowed to decay with no ditching having been done for at least half a century. .
However when these were cleaned most of the drains started running freely . We did have perhaps 50 acres they were in such bad state and with no knowledge of the old scheme gradually work our way across the farm. It was nearly all done by hand , with a digger as very frequently we would start near a wet spot and very quickly pick up the old drains which were still running mostly clay tile but also earlier stone drains using the local limestone with two stones on edge supporting a small slab across the top, nothing under
 

Kevtherev

Member
Location
Welshpool Powys
3B8817DC-28D4-492A-8CA5-E61D85029383.jpeg
9FD4B246-C730-4305-BC3D-F639844F3F39.jpeg
 

onthehoof

Member
Location
Cambs
Back to original post after a bit of head scratching I think I’ve sussed it.

9FF1EBA8-747D-489B-BF09-4FA15067FFAF.jpeg


It’s a new plan over the top of an old plan, as suggested the dotted plus solid lines are the old drains and the single solid lines are the new drains, regarding the numbers up the sides the numbers on the outside of the field refer to the distance between the old drains and the numbers on the inside of the field refer to the distance between the new drains, this makes sense as it means the lines are drawn to scale and the numbers are written halfway between the two either old drains or new drains.
On the left hand side I had already found the first new drain at 60ft from the bottom line (ditch). Today I tried to find the next drain up so measured 155ft up from the first new drain, dug for two hours found nothing, came home and looked at map again, so realising how its been done the second drain (old drain) wont be 155ft from the first drain but 155ft from the bottom ditch, the next (old) drain should be 101ft from this one, the next one (new) should be 249 ft from the first drain although it has 172’ written next to it refers to the distance between the two old drains and again the next number up 286’ doesn’t refer to the old drain it sits on but the distance between the two new drains.
The thing to remember is the number is written halfway between the two drains to which it is referring to.
 
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Top cereal and oilseed growers honoured at the Yield Enhancement Network Awards 2021

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Despite an average growing year for most crops, many growers managed to go above and beyond their predicted max yields, with Lincolnshire grower Tim Lamyman taking the top spots for his wheat yields and his world record breaking winter barley yield.

The highest cereal and oilseed yields achieved at harvest 2021 were announced at this year’s Yield Enhancement Network (YEN) Awards on Wednesday 24th November at the Croptec Show. With award presentations by Tom Bradshaw, Vice President of NFU, 24 farms took home the evening’s top awards for highest yield and highest potential yield achieved for wheat, winter and spring barley, oats, and oilseed. The 2021 winners came from all corners of the UK, as well as from as far afield as Finland and New Zealand.

Familiar names from 2020 made the...
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