Anyone using stone crusher in uk

Kidds

Member
Horticulture
I could do with one on some of my land, it genuinely looks just like where they were working at times.
Looks like a cobbled yard after it has been rained on but it is very good land for growing stuff. Wouldn't want to put potatoes on it though. 🤣
 

BRB John

Member
BASIS
Location
Aberdeenshire
Is it actually crushing them though? Or just burial them deep down?
I think it might work on certain types of rocks but not for others.
I have wondered if a rock crusher on the back of a destoner would work rather than a stone basket.
 

Will 1594

Member
Arable Farmer
I could do with one on some of my land, it genuinely looks just like where they were working at times.
Looks like a cobbled yard after it has been rained on but it is very good land for growing stuff. Wouldn't want to put potatoes on it though. 🤣
sure you would not
 

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It is a very good idea, brilliant in fact. I could do with one on some of my land, it genuinely looks just like where they were working at times. Looks like a cobbled yard after it has been rained on but it is very good land for growing stuff. Wouldn't want to put potatoes on it though.
Mine grows high yeilds of caulie but the stone causes mental health stress at tilling time.
 

Gav

Member
Trade
Location
Norfolk
Is it actually crushing them though? Or just burial them deep down?
I think it might work on certain types of rocks but not for others.
I have wondered if a rock crusher on the back of a destoner would work rather than a stone basket.
It’s crushing them, certain types of stone will break up smaller than others. Can be used for regrading farm tracks or in fields with models that can work up to 70cm deep.
I work for the U.K. importer of the Valentini range so can answer any questions that you may have on them.
 

Goweresque

Member
Location
North Wilts
I seem to remember someone telling me that the process of crushing stone in field ruins your soil. Won't grow anything afterwards. Can't for the life of me remember who it was, but I do remember they were quite emphatic about it. I think I'd want to collect the stone rather than crush it in situ, hardcore is worth quite a bit, building stone (if you have that sort) is worth a lot.
 

daveydiesel1

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co antrim
It’s crushing them, certain types of stone will break up smaller than others. Can be used for regrading farm tracks or in fields with models that can work up to 70cm deep.
I work for the U.K. importer of the Valentini range so can answer any questions that you may have on them.
So what is the ballpark figure for a 2.5 or 3 meter wide machine and will it work with big boulders
 

Danllan

Member
Location
Sir Gar / Carms
I seem to remember someone telling me that the process of crushing stone in field ruins your soil. Won't grow anything afterwards. Can't for the life of me remember who it was, but I do remember they were quite emphatic about it. I think I'd want to collect the stone rather than crush it in situ, hardcore is worth quite a bit, building stone (if you have that sort) is worth a lot.
Extremely high-speed weathering really... I've a memory from my early childhood, so 70s, of visiting a friend of my father somewhere by Northampton - Weedon comes to mind, but I don't know why. Anyway, he had more stone than I'd ever seen before and was using something like this back then in the fields; point is, he was a good farmer and knew his stuff, so I guess it didn't do any harm.

I am absolutely certain it was crushing because I remember it distinctly, and was familiar with what we used in Herts to take the flints off the lands, and this didn't remove, just broke up. I haven't seen anything like it since in the UK but have in South Africa. The one in Northants didn't leave a trail like the one in the video above; the stone was brought up, crushed and just left on the surface.
 
I seem to remember someone telling me that the process of crushing stone in field ruins your soil. Won't grow anything afterwards. Can't for the life of me remember who it was, but I do remember they were quite emphatic about it. I think I'd want to collect the stone rather than crush it in situ, hardcore is worth quite a bit, building stone (if you have that sort) is worth a lot.
You do lose depth though, if you remove the stone.
 
Mine grows high yeilds of caulie but the stone causes mental health stress at tilling time.
Just been using the old bartshi tiller at 4 inch feel more stable now, transplanting this afternoon.

I think the stone holds moisture & drains the land, but it needs to be smaller. On a small scale I walk around smashing the larger ones with a sledge hammer, it breaks very easily. But not as easy as Jones tiller shear bolts. The bartshi has a slip clutch, although I assume it has seized.
It’s crushing them, certain types of stone will break up smaller than others. Can be used for regrading farm tracks or in fields with models that can work up to 70cm deep.
I work for the U.K. importer of the Valentini range so can answer any questions that you may have on them.
Some interesting stuff, Gav

I like the small one in the range

Also the trencher machine looks like a superb bit of kit
 

Gav

Member
Trade
Location
Norfolk
So what is the ballpark figure for a 2.5 or 3 meter wide machine and will it work with big boulders
Ballpark figure would depend on what depth you wanted the machine to work to, the larger machines will chew away at larger boulders it just depends how large large is if that makes sense.

Just been using the old bartshi tiller at 4 inch feel more stable now, transplanting this afternoon.

I think the stone holds moisture & drains the land, but it needs to be smaller. On a small scale I walk around smashing the larger ones with a sledge hammer, it breaks very easily. But not as easy as Jones tiller shear bolts. The bartshi has a slip clutch, although I assume it has seized.

Some interesting stuff, Gav

I like the small one in the range

Also the trencher machine looks like a superb bit of kit
Certainly makes a change from the usual arable and grassland kit. Even the smaller Leon machine can work to 15cm deep in soil and 7cm in hard standing. Its probably one of the most popular machines we sell from the range. The trenching wheels are certainly a good piece of kit for laying cables as long as you know for certain there are no other service connections in the way!

These were taken last year when we set off a Valentini Leon with a customer in a granite track.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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