Argentinean corn in your corn flakes

Kidds

Member
Horticulture
Should eat weetabix or shredded 100% uk wheat and with milk 100 % British breakfast

You can get 100% home grown weetabix, locally grown as well. Here is how.

When you go combining in the summer, take a sack with you.

Wait until the wheat is absolutely perfectly fit. In fact, a little bit over fit and very very dry is beneficial.

Combine the wheat with great care and only use approved and perfectly sanitised trailers to haul the wheat away.

Once the wheat is all cut, open the panels on the combine, every inspection trap and lid off as well.

Take your sack and clean the chaff, dust and other MOG into the sack.

Take the sack home, grab a handful, put it in a bowl and eat it. Hey presto, weetabix.
 

Scholsey

Member
Location
Herefordshire
A ridiculous amount of things get made with corn starch/flour/syrup.


This says we imported over 1,000,000 tonnes of maize just from EU countries, so much more likely to be nearer if not over 2,000,000 tonnes of maize imported, that’s a lot of acres of maize and a lot of stuck combined in December!
 
A ridiculous amount of things get made with corn starch/flour/syrup.


This says we imported over 1,000,000 tonnes of maize just from EU countries, so much more likely to be nearer if not over 2,000,000 tonnes of maize imported, that’s a lot of acres of maize and a lot of stuck combined in December!
The volumes of commodities and co-products/by-products will be insane. We really don't recognise how much stuff the livestock industries consume.
 

melted welly

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
DD9.
A ridiculous amount of things get made with corn starch/flour/syrup.


This says we imported over 1,000,000 tonnes of maize just from EU countries, so much more likely to be nearer if not over 2,000,000 tonnes of maize imported, that’s a lot of acres of maize and a lot of stuck combined in December!
Citric acid is very often derived from maize. Try finding something in a packet or jar that doesn’t contain that.
 

melted welly

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
DD9.
You can get 100% home grown weetabix, locally grown as well. Here is how.

When you go combining in the summer, take a sack with you.

Wait until the wheat is absolutely perfectly fit. In fact, a little bit over fit and very very dry is beneficial.

Combine the wheat with great care and only use approved and perfectly sanitised trailers to haul the wheat away.

Once the wheat is all cut, open the panels on the combine, every inspection trap and lid off as well.

Take your sack and clean the chaff, dust and other MOG into the sack.

Take the sack home, grab a handful, put it in a bowl and eat it. Hey presto, weetabix.
I always thought weetabix was made from barley awns.

every day’s a school day.
 

Steevo

Member
Location
Gloucestershire
It certainly looks to my untrained eye to be made of whatever falls off the back of a combine, barley or wheat I know not. Looks like the stuff you throw away from sieving grain!

That would be too good for them!

Sieve those tailings. Throw away the good part. Leave the rest out in the rain for a day or two and that’s perfect to use for Weetabix.
 

Flatlander

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lorette Manitoba
I might be wrong and someone will probably correct me on this but I was under the impression that cornflakes are not made from regular corn/maize. Modern maize isn’t digestible enough for human consumption. I do know that a lot of popcorn is grown in Washington state and it’s a white type that’s specially bred for the popping market. So maybe cornflake maize isnt a crop that’s able to be grown in the uk.
 

Is Red tractor detrimental to your mental health?

  • Yes, Red tractor increase my stress and anxiety

    Votes: 282 98.3%
  • No, Red tractor gives me peace of mind that the product I produce is safe to enter the food chain

    Votes: 5 1.7%

HSENI names new farm safety champions

  • 117
  • 0
Written by William Kellett from Agriland

Farm-safety-640x360.png
The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
Top