Australia Free Trade Deal?

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
I know nothing about slats having never used them but I do think you can provide high welfare inside

I think you can too, always nice to watch a well bedded, content group of cattle in a shed on a cold wet day. (y)
I've seen some of these slatted sheds too though. No bedding, bugger all space, cold and damp, cattle seem to spend more time standing in the ones I've seen too. Even worse when the grass is growing and the suns shining and they're still stuck in there.
High welfare my arse.
 

Hilly

Member
I think you can too, always nice to watch a well bedded, content group of cattle in a shed on a cold wet day. (y)
I've seen some of these slatted sheds too though. No bedding, bugger all space, cold and damp, cattle seem to spend more time standing in the ones I've seen too. Even worse when the grass is growing and the suns shining and they're still stuck in there.
High welfare my arse.
You also get very nice slatts with rubber mating on , always look very comfortable.
 

glow worm

Member
Location
cornwall
Several comment re the environmental impact of using soya in animal feed. Someone I work with doesn't like the fact that I'm a dairy farmer and always brings in soya milk . Not because they have an allergy etc but because its more environmentally friendly. I don't believe its as environmentally friendly and nutritionally good for you as they think? I know very little about sheep but admit to never hearing about Mulesing until seen recently in various pictures etc. Surely it is not allowed in this country? and if it isn't, why the **** can it be allowed to be imported. Talk about double standards.
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
You also get very nice slatts with rubber mating on , always look very comfortable.

Yes I'm sure you do. The ones I saw didn't look all that flash in my opinion.
Perhaps because I'm used to systems where cattle were regularly bedded on straw.
Not a big fan of individual calf pens in some of the old, damp, airless buildings SOME dairy farms have.
There's good and bad of every system in every country.
 

Muck Spreader

Member
Location
Limousin
I think you can too, always nice to watch a well bedded, content group of cattle in a shed on a cold wet day. (y)
I've seen some of these slatted sheds too though. No bedding, bugger all space, cold and damp, cattle seem to spend more time standing in the ones I've seen too. Even worse when the grass is growing and the suns shining and they're still stuck in there.
High welfare my arse.

I have reared fat cattle in slatted sheds and to be fair they grew like mushrooms on them. However, I would never take the public to see them as they could look hellish at times. You have to keep the stocking density just right along with the ration, otherwise the stats can start bridging the animals end up looking like a moving mass of steamy sh!t. In any event we would generally finish them off for 3 or 4 weeks in a straw shed to clean them up a bit.
 
Don’t know anyone who can afford to just let sheep die. I got $250 a head for my old ewes last year.

Alot dont get it, u can run on a shoe string amd have poor animal welfare, but u must then cop the heat that comes with it, plus have your market place shrink as more and more consumers become aware.

Every business has to adapt to challenges, and if you dont u go out the back door, and neglecting animal welfare is not adapting to the challenge.

In the words of the great James Hetfield

"Choose your fate and die"

Ant....
 
Several comment re the environmental impact of using soya in animal feed. Someone I work with doesn't like the fact that I'm a dairy farmer and always brings in soya milk . Not because they have an allergy etc but because its more environmentally friendly. I don't believe its as environmentally friendly and nutritionally good for you as they think? I know very little about sheep but admit to never hearing about Mulesing until seen recently in various pictures etc. Surely it is not allowed in this country? and if it isn't, why the **** can it be allowed to be imported. Talk about double standards.
The pictures spread by animal libber groups are extreme and for the purpose of stopping all sheep farming.
In reality not much skin is removed, painkillers are used and it is nowhere as painful for the lamb as a ring on the nuts.
 

glow worm

Member
Location
cornwall
The pictures spread by animal libber groups are extreme and for the purpose of stopping all sheep farming.
In reality not much skin is removed, painkillers are used and it is nowhere as painful for the lamb as a ring on the nuts.
No, I didn't look at an animal libber page, I looked at Wikipedia where it says that the practice was supposed to have been phased out in 2018, but maybe that's not the case?
 

JimAndy

Member
Location
portadown
Several comment re the environmental impact of using soya in animal feed. Someone I work with doesn't like the fact that I'm a dairy farmer and always brings in soya milk . Not because they have an allergy etc but because its more environmentally friendly. I don't believe its as environmentally friendly and nutritionally good for you as they think? I know very little about sheep but admit to never hearing about Mulesing until seen recently in various pictures etc. Surely it is not allowed in this country? and if it isn't, why the **** can it be allowed to be imported. Talk about double standards.

don't know if many have read this

 

Wolds Beef

Member
Interesting article with comments by Scott Donaldson, H & H MD. He has said that the aussie deal could have huge implications for the Enviroment. May be some one could link the article.!
WB
 

Bruce Almighty

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
England
According to my mates in South Australia, the lamb price is higher there than here.
Stop worrying, they are nearer to the Chinese market than us.
Are they going to stop selling to their existing customers so they can sell to us ?
With global warming and climate change, it has been suggested that in future it'll be too hot & dry to regularly & reliably produce food in warmer climates than ours, we will have to wait & see
 

JimAndy

Member
Location
portadown
According to my mates in South Australia, the lamb price is higher there than here.
Stop worrying, they are nearer to the Chinese market than us.
Are they going to stop selling to their existing customers so they can sell to us ?
With global warming and climate change, it has been suggested that in future it'll be too hot & dry to regularly & reliably produce food in warmer climates than ours, we will have to wait & see

i was at a talk by Doug Avery . he said much the same. That after the UK joined the Eu they had to find new markets which they not going to give up just for the UK. and with sheep numbers down and much of New Zealand agri focus on the chinese/asian market. UK farmers have little to fear from them
 

Bruce Almighty

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
England
i was at a talk by Doug Avery . he said much the same. That after the UK joined the Eu they had to find new markets which they not going to give up just for the UK. and with sheep numbers down and much of New Zealand agri focus on the chinese/asian market. UK farmers have little to fear from them
and the response from the NFU is . . .
Their standards aren't as high as ours
We have Red Tractor . . . (And all the sh!t that goes with it which earns us nothing extra)
 

Hilly

Member
and the response from the NFU is . . .
Their standards aren't as high as ours
We have Red Tractor . . . (And all the sh!t that goes with it which earns us nothing extra)
They want to tread carefully with that standards bull sh!t , they might find others have higher standards , egg on face . I see nothing special about British standards myself if honest .
 

New report underlines need for joined-up action to protect rivers

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New report underlines need for joined-up action to protect rivers

Written by Defra Press Office

A wide river is in view in a valley in the background, a drystone wall is behind the river, and large, green trees are prominent in the scene.


The Rivers Trust has today launched its State of Our Rivers report aiming to allow the English public understand and explore the health of their rivers on a national and local scale.

Environment Minister Rebecca Pow and Environment Agency Director John Leyland attended the launch panel to discuss the ways in which the...
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