Battling the reeds with goats and ancient land drains. Any interest, experience or advice?

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
This is a bit niche, so not sure anyone else here will have done this, but you never know :unsure:
We've recently taken on a 17acre smallholding on the Pennines. The fields have not been properly looked after for years so i'm working to improve the drainage and convert the land from the invasion of the Moorland Reed back to grass for sheep (as it was).
This invasion is 'a thing' and a big problem in many areas of The North:

So I hit on the idea of getting a couple of goats in to clear it, what do I know about goats? Only what i've read so far.
Apparently normal goats need tall fences and they often want to get out and wander around. My questions are:
Do Pygmy goats eat the same things that larger goats do?
If they stray do they go far and will they come back? We're pretty remote, so if they do get out they'll end up on the moors or in someone else's moorland field so no real harm would be done.
Much of the affected land is not bog so they'll be ok there.

I need to know how to keep them, so will do some Googling and get my books out after typing this out.
I'll post up about ancient field drains later when I have more time and more for interest rather than anything else.
The plant is a Common Rush , its called Rushes not Reeds.
 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
Well, we call them rashes.
I know ;)

Green Grow The Rashes​


Green grow the rashes , O;
Green grow the rashes , O;
The sweetest hours that e'er I spend,
Are spent amang the lasses, O.

There's nought but care on ev'ry han' ,
In ev'ry hour that passes, O:
What signifies the life o' man,
An' 'twere na for the lasses, O.

The war'ly race may riches chase, -
An' riches still may fly them, O;
An' tho' at last they catch them fast,
Their hearts can ne'er enjoy them, O.

But gie me a cannie hour at e'en ,
My arms about my dearie, O;
An' war'ly cares, an' war'ly men,
May a' gae tapsalteerie , O!

For you sae douce , ye sneer at this;
Ye're nought but senseless asses, O:
The wisest man the warl' e'er saw ,
He dearly lov'd the lasses, O.

Auld Nature swears, the lovely dears
Her noblest work she classes, O:
Her prentice han' she try'd on man,
An' then she made the lasses, O.

Green grow the rashes , O;
Green grow the rashes , O;
The sweetest hours that e'er I spend,
Are spent amang the lasses, O.

Robert Burns
 

Wood field

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South Pennines
Not sure where in West Yorkshire the op is but,
We have a piece of ground we bought seven or so years ago , it was so bad a neighbour got his quad stuck amongst the bog and thick rush
Drain , lime and manure , now it’s a 15 acre mowing meadow
Your welcome to come and see it
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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