BBC at it again re meat and climate

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Joanna Lumley says that cows are killing the planet. So it must be true. She wants to microcontrol what everyone does and eats. 1984 is fast approaching with consent from the proletariat [until it effects them directly], not that she is one of the prols, obviously.


There is a collective hysteria proliferating in the First World. The Third World is too busy searching for their next meal and for oil to keep them warm over Winter.
 

texelburger

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Herefordshire
So does livestock production never cause soil to need cultivation.

Do you only feed permanent pasture & never use concentrates, if that is the case well done. Do you sell fat or store?
I dont farm cattle,personally, just am fed up of the BBC bias that needs correcting.Livestock grazed leys with concentrates would still have,imo,lower carbon emissions than plant foods grown all round the World with artificial fertilisers,agrochemicals .
A lot of livestock production wouldn't need soil to be cultivated,just look at upland farms in the UK.Some odd fields that are flat enough may be reseeded but much is hill ground with permanent grass that has been there since time immemorial.
 

Muddyroads

Member
Location
Devon
I want someone to tell me what a plant based diet consists of, in detail.
I have no doubt that the most environmentally damaging part of my farm is where I grow veg, which is ironic. At least they are locally grown but you need more than brassicas, leeks and sweet corn to survive. Without my livestock manure to feed the veg there would be very little crop and a reduction in my soil carbon.
 
the nitrogen fertiliser produced in the uk produces no co2 in its production that is not needed
with out the co2 from the veg and fruit wastage which would increase the carbon footprint

with out livestock on the pasture the carbon sequestration of the past would fall
grass needs nitrogen to use co2 out of the atmosphere

burning gas to heat houses all the co2 is released into the atmosphere 100% of it
non is used

given up on the bbc
as an organisation it is not meeting its charter on many fronts not fit for purpose
scrap the licence fee make it subscription based
 

tepapa

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North Wales
It boils my p**s what the bbc splurge. To try and destroy food production in this country and then show film of all these poor buggers starving in Afghanistan and having to sell their kids to buy food so they can survive!
I bet if you offered the starving people in Afghanistan red meat but told them by eating it they'd be destroying the planet, the lot would be devoured.
 
I dont farm cattle,personally, just am fed up of the BBC bias that needs correcting.Livestock grazed leys with concentrates would still have,imo,lower carbon emissions than plant foods grown all round the World with artificial fertilisers,agrochemicals .
A lot of livestock production wouldn't need soil to be cultivated,just look at upland farms in the UK.Some odd fields that are flat enough may be reseeded but much is hill ground with permanent grass that has been there since time immemorial.

So what do they put in the creep feeders & why are so many wagons taking straw & fodder up into the hills.

I'm actually on mixed farming side.

But on here I've read such a load of bullocks, that someone just needs to tell the truth.

Farming does do all these bad things but it is doing what society has asked it to do.

Of course extensive livestock is great, but there is very little of that. Some dairy farms will plough every inch every two years, use large amounts of artifical fertiliser & buy in concentrates from south america.

What ever the rights & wrongs we need to look at the world as it is & what it needs. Many will say on here that is what we have always done, HAVE we the last 60 years is a tiny amount of time in World history terms.

As said I hope mixed farming thrives in the future, but we need to be open to any new ideas, providing we test them first.
 

texelburger

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Herefordshire
So what do they put in the creep feeders & why are so many wagons taking straw & fodder up into the hills.

I'm actually on mixed farming side.

But on here I've read such a load of bullocks, that someone just needs to tell the truth.

Farming does do all these bad things but it is doing what society has asked it to do.

Of course extensive livestock is great, but there is very little of that. Some dairy farms will plough every inch every two years, use large amounts of artifical fertiliser & buy in concentrates from south america.

What ever the rights & wrongs we need to look at the world as it is & what it needs. Many will say on here that is what we have always done, HAVE we the last 60 years is a tiny amount of time in World history terms.

As said I hope mixed farming thrives in the future, but we need to be open to any new ideas, providing we test them first.
I would say there is a lot of sense talked,by many,on this forum relating to the climate.There is a lot of bullocks spoken by the BBC and the media in general.
 

MX7

Member
Location
cotswolds
I saw a chart the other day(I think it was on the BBC News App) which had beef at the top and beef production was meant to have more or use a lot more carbon than any other livestock!!!!
How can the above be possibly true as a lot our beef is produced from beef fed on grass and then perhaps fattened over winter on cereals and silage???? :scratchhead: :scratchhead: :banghead:
 

Cheesehead

Member
Livestock Farmer
So what do they put in the creep feeders & why are so many wagons taking straw & fodder up into the hills.

I'm actually on mixed farming side.

But on here I've read such a load of bullocks, that someone just needs to tell the truth.

Farming does do all these bad things but it is doing what society has asked it to do.

Of course extensive livestock is great, but there is very little of that. Some dairy farms will plough every inch every two years, use large amounts of artifical fertiliser & buy in concentrates from south america.

What ever the rights & wrongs we need to look at the world as it is & what it needs. Many will say on here that is what we have always done, HAVE we the last 60 years is a tiny amount of time in World history terms.

As said I hope mixed farming thrives in the future, but we need to be open to any new ideas, providing we test them first.
I have always had trouble getting my head around the difference between a finishing unit here and a feed lot in the US other than one is usually in a shed with concentrate and creep feeders while the other is outside with a TMR ration other than size.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
I saw a chart the other day which had beef at the top and beef production was meant to have more or use a lot more carbon than any other livestock!!!!
How can the above be possibly true where a lot our beef is produced from beef fed on grass and then perhaps fattened over winter on cereals and silage???? :scratchhead: :scratchhead: :banghead:
The scientific explanation is that they are ruminants and the more forage they eat the more methane they produce. However, a static ruminant population does not increase atmospheric methane because methane only lives for ten years at most and therefore a cow only maintains existing methane levels. More intensively farmed cattle produce less methane per head. Ruminants have roamed the Earth in current or greater numbers since time immemorial and they are certainly not responsible for increasing greenhouse gases.
Neither is the use of nitrogen fertiliser which has just been show to produce essential CO2 that is utilised by non-agricultural industries including for drinks and cooling nuclear reactors. Plus of course, CO2 is essential for plant growth and therefore all life on Earth, which is all carbon based.
 

MX7

Member
Location
cotswolds
The scientific explanation is that they are ruminants and the more forage they eat the more methane they produce. However, a static ruminant population does not increase atmospheric methane because methane only lives for ten years at most and therefore a cow only maintains existing methane levels. More intensively farmed cattle produce less methane per head. Ruminants have roamed the Earth in current or greater numbers since time immemorial and they are certainly not responsible for increasing greenhouse gases.
Neither is the use of nitrogen fertiliser which has just been show to produce essential CO2 that is utilised by non-agricultural industries including for drinks and cooling nuclear reactors. Plus of course, CO2 is essential for plant growth and therefore all life on Earth, which is all carbon based.
Many thanks for the explanation.
How on earth do scientists, journalists, media etc get away with broadcasting, publishing so much distorted information that is obviously swayed to suit their own agenda. :mad:
 

Muddyroads

Member
Location
Devon
The scientific explanation is that they are ruminants and the more forage they eat the more methane they produce. However, a static ruminant population does not increase atmospheric methane because methane only lives for ten years at most and therefore a cow only maintains existing methane levels. More intensively farmed cattle produce less methane per head. Ruminants have roamed the Earth in current or greater numbers since time immemorial and they are certainly not responsible for increasing greenhouse gases.
Neither is the use of nitrogen fertiliser which has just been show to produce essential CO2 that is utilised by non-agricultural industries including for drinks and cooling nuclear reactors. Plus of course, CO2 is essential for plant growth and therefore all life on Earth, which is all carbon based.
Isn’t the case for the prosecution based on the idea that because we can’t instantly stop burning fossil fuels, we have to prevent as much methane and CO2 production as possible though (obviously conveniently forgetting the emissions from rice etc.)?
 

puppet

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
sw scotland
The IPCC report on land use actually highlighted sustainable beef and dairy amid concerns about food supply. In the south and west of Scotland you will see 90% land in grass grown to feed cattle including some of the largest intensive dairy farms in the UK.
The report quoted 23% of global emissions were from farming, forestry and other land use but they mitigated against around 30% of the other 73% which equals 22% so almost neutral already. A lot of the GHGs were from deforestation not farting cows
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Isn’t the case for the prosecution based on the idea that because we can’t instantly stop burning fossil fuels, we have to prevent as much methane and CO2 production as possible though (obviously conveniently forgetting the emissions from rice etc.)?
I suspect that it is driven by vegetarian and vegan propagandists.
Wetlands are indeed massive emitters of methane but nobody is bothered about that, probably because it is 'natural'. More natural than the poor cow and sheep.:rolleyes:. Indeed there are campaigns to increase wetlands in many areas, which will inevitably increase gas emissions. However, that fact never makes the headlines, never mind almost daily like the relatively benign cows.

Yet the very same people that bitch about this subject the most are the ones desperate to fly to their biennial foreign holidays and ocean cruises.
 

MX7

Member
Location
cotswolds
Isn’t the case for the prosecution based on the idea that because we can’t instantly stop burning fossil fuels, we have to prevent as much methane and CO2 production as possible though (obviously conveniently forgetting the emissions from rice etc.)?
Well we certainly saw what happens when fertiliser factories stopped production of CO2 and that was only after a few days, “God help the planet and mankind”, come to think of it I will rephrase that, “God help
Mankind”,the planet will keep going I expect,long after mankind has destroyed it self.
 

yin ewe

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co Antrim
Surely the best thing the people of the UK can do for the planet is to eat a balanced locally produced diet. We grow veg, make all types of dairy products, produce a variety of meat from chicken to venison and are surrounded by fish filled waters. Really doesn't make sense to ship in the likes of avacados and almonds from the other side of the world. Not a fashionable idea in this day and age but makes sense to me.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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