Beef / Lamb & Pig Price Tracker

Electricfencer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Cotswolds
Anyone who buy's a descent amount of sheep in markets know the scab risk and has to weigh up if the risk not dipping and keep separate or dip every thing. The problem is usually (but not exclusively) when someone wants 10 store lambs to graze there paddock so go to market to buy some scabby cheap lambs, these lambs are never dipped or treated for anything (sometimes include 2 tup lambs) and promptly get out and roam the county.
 

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
Anyone who buy's a descent amount of sheep in markets know the scab risk and has to weigh up if the risk not dipping and keep separate or dip every thing. The problem is usually (but not exclusively) when someone wants 10 store lambs to graze there paddock so go to market to buy some scabby cheap lambs, these lambs are never dipped or treated for anything (sometimes include 2 tup lambs) and promptly get out and roam the county.
Anyone who buys a decent amount yeah but you can’t just go and buy 5-10 at a special sale or anything that takes your fancy 🤦🏻‍♂️ One of the reasons I just don’t bother going to the marts as I can’t buy from there anyway
 

aangus

Member
Location
cumbria
Anyone who buy's a descent amount of sheep in markets know the scab risk and has to weigh up if the risk not dipping and keep separate or dip every thing. The problem is usually (but not exclusively) when someone wants 10 store lambs to graze there paddock so go to market to buy some scabby cheap lambs, these lambs are never dipped or treated for anything (sometimes include 2 tup lambs) and promptly get out and roam the county.
Been using Cydectin LA here for the last 2 years for bought in shearlings and has been excellent, was using Dectomax before but didn't seem to work here.
 

Smith31

Member
Anything that comes out of a mart is to dip in any case. Those type of sheep should be treated and not be there, however there’s plenty that will be in need of dipping which aren’t obviously showing any signs

Life would be so much easier if all farmers were like you, if we all worked like you do we could control outbreaks far better, its the diseases and infections which are not visible that cause the most damage.

Unfortunately one serious outbreak from bought in stock can quite easily wipe out a farmers annual profit.
 
Life would be so much easier if all farmers were like you, if we all worked like you do we could control outbreaks far better, its the diseases and infections which are not visible that cause the most damage.

Unfortunately one serious outbreak from bought in stock can quite easily wipe out a farmers annual profit.
Sheep don’t do any good if they have it so there’s no point or saving in having scabby sheep. It’s one of those things like worms, cocci or the rest of it very costly but some folks can’t see it.
 

gwi1890

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North wales
Dipping Should be compulsory again !
To those with scab yes, for people who don’t have scab then no, both my neighbouring farm have scab one dips his ewes then next doors scabby sheep land in his fields and he’s back to square one it’s a continuous cycle, all boundaries here are double fenced now, how can any farm with sheep scratching and itching be profitable, both farms are also farm assured it’s goes to show how much of a joke that scheme is. Unless there are serious repercussion for the offenders then it’s not going to change anytime soon.
 

Electricfencer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Cotswolds
To those with scab yes, for people who don’t have scab then no, both my neighbouring farm have scab one dips his ewes then next doors scabby sheep land in his fields and he’s back to square one it’s a continuous cycle, all boundaries here are double fenced now, how can any farm with sheep scratching and itching be profitable, both farms are also farm assured it’s goes to show how much of a joke that scheme is. Unless there are serious repercussion for the offenders then it’s not going to change anytime soon.
We managed to get scab/lice from next doors sheep that had a large river between us. We reckoned that bird carried wool between there sheep and ours.
 
We managed to get scab/lice from next doors sheep that had a large river between us. We reckoned that bird carried wool between there sheep and ours.
A neighbour who always had a bit of itch on the go packed in and ever since our sheep which were always more than ready to dip pre August previously look clean now. The sheep were rarely mixed and no rubbing on boundaries apparent.
 
Been using Cydectin LA here for the last 2 years for bought in shearlings and has been excellent, was using Dectomax before but didn't seem to work here.
I think Dectomax kills scab but only for a short period so you would really have to inject them and move them to eradicate it as it lives on fences and walls for a fortnight. Cydectin la has some cover and I think the cover lasts longer than the scab can live on other objects. Someone might correct me
 
I think Dectomax kills scab but only for a short period so you would really have to inject them and move them to eradicate it as it lives on fences and walls for a fortnight. Cydectin la has some cover and I think the cover lasts longer than the scab can live on other objects. Someone might correct me
Dectomax twice if on mucky ground
 

organic

Member
Location
Powys
Hereford Tuesday December 14th

STORE LAMBS - 5774 Auctioneer - Greg Christopher

A large December entry with just under 6000 lambs for mid December met with a busier ringside of
purchasers and several distant purchasers.

A very mixed entry with one of the largest shows of small, plain and hill bred lambs and several clear up
lambs seen for many a day. The strength and well bred farming lambs would be very well sold and slightly
dearer on the week. Some very strong stores in places with Texel ram lambs to £149.50, other Texel cross
wethers to £142, several trading £120 to £140, to include a bunch of 29 ram lambs to £126.50.

Stronger bunches £110 to £120 with some good runs attracting a very strong following, good runs of Suffolk
cross lambs trading £110 to £120.

The farming lambs seeing the better bunches and smarter Texel lambs from £97 to £108 with several £100 to
£105. Level bunches with condition the easiest sold with plainer farming lambs £90 to £95. The good
lambs holding their own throughout with several lambs in the last 1000 sold still £97 to £104.

Medium keeping lambs in places starting to show the effects of the last 10 days’ weather, however the
smarter well bred lambs £86 to £90 with plenty trading late £80’s.

Plainer Mule wethers and harder bred lambs from £77 to £85 depending on frame and condition. A large
show of longer term lambs with the well bred types from £70 to £78, however plainer types from £60 to £70
and finding fewer customers each week.

As mentioned earlier the largest show of longer term and clear up lambs seen this season. These harder
work with the lambs with condition from £50 to £65, plainer and smaller sorts from £30 to £45 to include
several native and rare breed specials.

Ram lambs in general lacked the strength or farming sorts that we normally see in Hereford with no end of
smaller plainer Welsh and harder bred ram lambs - these £50 to £75 depending on frame.

Strength £95 to £125, with harder bred medium keeping sorts £80 to £90.

An excellent overall average considering the number of small and joint-ill lambs. Today we have seen
several lambs very lame, vendors - please leave these at home, you can not expect purchasers to put right
your problems. Any joint-ill lambs please declare.
 

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AHDB planting and variety survey

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The AHDB Planting and Variety Survey provides the earliest view of the planted area for the upcoming harvest in the United Kingdom (UK).​


Complete the Planting and Variety Survey

The survey will estimate the area of cereals and oilseed rape intended for harvest in 2022 in the UK. It aims to assess the varietal composition of wheat, barley, oats and oilseed rape crops in the UK. The results of this survey will allow the industry to quantify domestic production, at a time when food security is more important than ever.
The information can be used to shape the domestic market and trade and assist levy payers in their marketing decisions. It will detail regional differences of cropping across the UK, which will help...
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