Beef / Lamb & Pig Price Tracker

Werzle

Member
Location
Midlands
It’s a quality product….it can’t hang around at £100 a head in this day and age…it’s 2022 not 1922
Cant force people to buy it though , costs are driven by ourselves a fair bit. If we produced less product on grass instead of shovelling bought in grub to everything we would have a premium priced product, but we fall over ourselves to mass produce and suck up input price increases rather than downtools.
 
Location
Cleveland
Cant force people to buy it though , costs are driven by ourselves a fair bit. If we produced less product on grass instead of shovelling bought in grub to everything we would have a premium priced product, but we fall over ourselves to mass produce and suck up input price increases rather than downtools.
The way it’s going there won’t be mass production going on for much longer
 

Optimus

Member
Hell of a shame inputs rose just as prices started to reflect the work involved. Electricity price rises are going to hammer some of the big intensive farms too. I think it will all go bang at some point. Have a drought summer on top of everything else and we will be in s.hit street
Just had to renew ours.think it'll be somewhere around £5k a year
 

Gedd

Member
Im currently visiting family in texas usa they are saying food costs are up 20% in the last 6 months and same problems as here cant get peoe back to work afyer their furlough scheme local butcher here not supermarket prices these are per pound prices
 

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sheepwise

Member
Location
SW Scotland
Funny that, I had lambs grade moderately there too and I wasn't the only one. Farm stock Scotland sent a delegation down to have a look. I was told that the regular grader seemed to overemphasise the importance of the shoulder, so anything with a moderate fore was an O grade, never mind what was behind it. Never mind it's meant to be an assessment of three areas and the shoulder is only 10% of the carcass value (I believe).
A man in this area (sadly no longer with us) who was a master at winning carcase competitions always said the shoulder was the most important part when assessing live lambs. A lamb with a good shoulder always had a good carcase overall. He used to come look at our tups before the premier sale and always put his hand on the shoulder before anything else.
 

sheepwise

Member
Location
SW Scotland
Was talking to a lad yesterday, his fert cost £16000 last year, it is going to be £55,000 this year when ge gets round to it, i dont think many of us have crossed that bridge yet!
If we use same amount of sheepfeed this winter it will come to £4000 more.
These costs are getting serious!
Speaking to a sheep farmer the other day who said he was going to sow a lot less fertiliser but feed his ewes for an extra month in the spring if required. He has done his calculations and reckons this to be the most economic way.
 

Poorbuthappy

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Devon
Not our problem if the supply chain after the farm gate has very high costs, they should do what EVERY other industry does ( with the exception of farming ) and that is pass these costs UP the chain and not down the chain back to farmers!
Read my post again.
We are selling direct to the public - beef, lamb, pork and chicken.
Lamb has more price resistance than beef or pork. Who am I supposed to pass the costs up the chain to?
Not saying its right, just stating it as it is.
Easier to make an extra £500 on a heifer by direct selling than an extra £20/ lamb on 20 lambs. Do the sums.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
A man in this area (sadly no longer with us) who was a master at winning carcase competitions always said the shoulder was the most important part when assessing live lambs. A lamb with a good shoulder always had a good carcase overall. He used to come look at our tups before the premier sale and always put his hand on the shoulder before anything else.

Definitely. It doesn't matter what species it is, if they have a poor shoulder then they aren't going to hang up well. Always a balance with lambing/calving ease of course, but you go too pointy & narrow and you might as well be breeding goats.

Poor shoulders is one of my bug bears at that sale btw. Far too many poor shouldered sheep, fed hard and purporting to have a carcass. :banghead:
 
A man in this area (sadly no longer with us) who was a master at winning carcase competitions always said the shoulder was the most important part when assessing live lambs. A lamb with a good shoulder always had a good carcase overall. He used to come look at our tups before the premier sale and always put his hand on the shoulder before anything else.
Fair point but we weren't talking Swaledales in this case!
 
I find it quite strange to read that some on here think lamb is too dear
There’s pages and pages of moaning about costs and low prices then suddenly it’s too high
Especially this year when our costs have rocketed. Farm inflation is 20% but that’s only permitted for inputs?? What the hell???
We are good enough to buy feed at £300 plus that was £250 a year ago Fertiliser for £6/700 that was £280 a year ago chemicals and fuel and everything else the same
Absolutely unbelievable
 
I find it quite strange to read that some on here think lamb is too dear
There’s pages and pages of moaning about costs and low prices then suddenly it’s too high
Especially this year when our costs have rocketed. Farm inflation is 20% but that’s only permitted for inputs?? What the hell???
We are good enough to buy feed at £300 plus that was £250 a year ago Fertiliser for £6/700 that was £280 a year ago chemicals sand fuel and everything else the same
Absolutely unbelievable
What have we had a fortnight of slight price resistance and everyone talking trade down. 2018 spring was a good trade and costs were less then.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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