Best 2nd hand loader tractor for a livestock farm.

jendan

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Northumberland
What would be the best and most reliable 2nd hand loader tractor,110hp-140hp, for under £40 k ? Claas,Massey,Case,and Valtra dealers all within 7 miles away.New Holland about 20 miles.
 

DeeGee

Member
Location
North East Wales
I’ve got a 113hp 2013 Valtra n series. Comfortable, reliable, simple little tractor.
Always makes me smile when tractors between 70 and 120 horsepower are sometimes referred to as small tractors, or ‘ideal for a smallholding’.

Half a century ago when I was in my teens we all had Massey 35s or the all new 135: Dextas or Majors or maybe even the new ‘heavyweight tractor for the really big jobs’ meaning a Ford 5000 or Massey 175.

Not one of these tractors had over 75hp: most had about 45 and 99% of British tractors were two wheel drive and cabs were very much optional and in the minority.

Yes there were more of them, and more staff to drive them, but they did everything on the farm and we always got the work done on time. Still have a 135 and a 265 here, but I admit I will always go for one of the modern tractors to do jobs. But half the time we don’t need all these horses under the bonnet and I often think that 100 is plenty for many of the jobs we do.

Wouldn’t want to go back, and you can’t halt progress; but it does make me smile when I hear of these 100 hp four wheel drive tractors being referred to as ‘little’!
 

toquark

Member
Always makes me smile when tractors between 70 and 120 horsepower are sometimes referred to as small tractors, or ‘ideal for a smallholding’.

Half a century ago when I was in my teens we all had Massey 35s or the all new 135: Dextas or Majors or maybe even the new ‘heavyweight tractor for the really big jobs’ meaning a Ford 5000 or Massey 175.

Not one of these tractors had over 75hp: most had about 45 and 99% of British tractors were two wheel drive and cabs were very much optional and in the minority.

Yes there were more of them, and more staff to drive them, but they did everything on the farm and we always got the work done on time. Still have a 135 and a 265 here, but I admit I will always go for one of the modern tractors to do jobs. But half the time we don’t need all these horses under the bonnet and I often think that 100 is plenty for many of the jobs we do.

Wouldn’t want to go back, and you can’t halt progress; but it does make me smile when I hear of these 100 hp four wheel drive tractors being referred to as ‘little’!
When your neighbours are all running 300hp things, the Valtra does look little. In fact it looks like a toy, especially when you get in the cab and find levers instead of computer screens! Agree with you though, a lot of kit does seem over powered nowadays. Given that the most these big tractors do round here is mow grass, cart bales or tow silage trailers. One of my farming mentors locally who runs a large beef and sheep enterprise over about 3000 acres does everything he needs with a 35 year old 70hp Same. I think he has the right idea.
 

jendan

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Northumberland
Always makes me smile when tractors between 70 and 120 horsepower are sometimes referred to as small tractors, or ‘ideal for a smallholding’.

Half a century ago when I was in my teens we all had Massey 35s or the all new 135: Dextas or Majors or maybe even the new ‘heavyweight tractor for the really big jobs’ meaning a Ford 5000 or Massey 175.

Not one of these tractors had over 75hp: most had about 45 and 99% of British tractors were two wheel drive and cabs were very much optional and in the minority.

Yes there were more of them, and more staff to drive them, but they did everything on the farm and we always got the work done on time. Still have a 135 and a 265 here, but I admit I will always go for one of the modern tractors to do jobs. But half the time we don’t need all these horses under the bonnet and I often think that 100 is plenty for many of the jobs we do.

Wouldn’t want to go back, and you can’t halt progress; but it does make me smile when I hear of these 100 hp four wheel drive tractors being referred to as ‘little’!
And a 5 gallon can or 20 litre or so of Diesel would do a days work. It was only 20p litre as well. We used to run a Kidd Double Chop on a David Brown 990 for many years.J reg and 58hp,it ran flat out all day. We upgraded to a 72hp DB 1200,and it blew up second time around the field,the dipstick flew out over the hedge.:ROFLMAO:. Seems rather funny now but not at the time. A £900 engine repair bill was a fair chunk of money in 1977. The J reg DB 990 appeared on E Bay a few years ago.
 

Tim G

Member
Livestock Farmer
Always makes me smile when tractors between 70 and 120 horsepower are sometimes referred to as small tractors, or ‘ideal for a smallholding’.

Half a century ago when I was in my teens we all had Massey 35s or the all new 135: Dextas or Majors or maybe even the new ‘heavyweight tractor for the really big jobs’ meaning a Ford 5000 or Massey 175.

Not one of these tractors had over 75hp: most had about 45 and 99% of British tractors were two wheel drive and cabs were very much optional and in the minority.

Yes there were more of them, and more staff to drive them, but they did everything on the farm and we always got the work done on time. Still have a 135 and a 265 here, but I admit I will always go for one of the modern tractors to do jobs. But half the time we don’t need all these horses under the bonnet and I often think that 100 is plenty for many of the jobs we do.

Wouldn’t want to go back, and you can’t halt progress; but it does make me smile when I hear of these 100 hp four wheel drive tractors being referred to as ‘little’!
Half a century before that most work was done with horses, those tractors would have caused some comments too no doubt.
 
Always makes me smile when tractors between 70 and 120 horsepower are sometimes referred to as small tractors, or ‘ideal for a smallholding’.

Half a century ago when I was in my teens we all had Massey 35s or the all new 135: Dextas or Majors or maybe even the new ‘heavyweight tractor for the really big jobs’ meaning a Ford 5000 or Massey 175.

Not one of these tractors had over 75hp: most had about 45 and 99% of British tractors were two wheel drive and cabs were very much optional and in the minority.

Yes there were more of them, and more staff to drive them, but they did everything on the farm and we always got the work done on time. Still have a 135 and a 265 here, but I admit I will always go for one of the modern tractors to do jobs. But half the time we don’t need all these horses under the bonnet and I often think that 100 is plenty for many of the jobs we do.

Wouldn’t want to go back, and you can’t halt progress; but it does make me smile when I hear of these 100 hp four wheel drive tractors being referred to as ‘little’!
Nothing over 95 hp here on 240 acre.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

Farm-safety-640x360.png
The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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