Black leg

daveydiesel1

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co antrim
Lost 2 calves to black leg this week. Field was reseeded last year after being reclaimed after we bought the land so never grazed it before. Was wondering what causes blackleg? I know u can vaccinate for it but never knew what the cause is
 

Sid

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South Molton
Lost 2 calves to black leg this week. Field was reseeded last year after being reclaimed after we bought the land so never grazed it before. Was wondering what causes blackleg? I know u can vaccinate for it but never knew what the cause is
Clostridial disease
Septicaemia basically.

Vaccine is in short supply to.

Edit

Comes from the soil.
Grazing too tight.
Probably see a lot of it this spring.
 

An Gof

Member
Location
Cornwall
Lost 2 calves to black leg this week. Field was reseeded last year after being reclaimed after we bought the land so never grazed it before. Was wondering what causes blackleg? I know u can vaccinate for it but never knew what the cause is
Clostridial disease.
Vaccine is pence so always worth doing in my opinion. Makes me laugh when people ask me if I get trouble with Blackleg and that’s why I vaccinate 🤦 I don’t get trouble because I vaccinate 👍

If you have a bad go with Blackleg the losses in one year can be more than the vaccine cost for a farming lifetime.
 

Sid

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South Molton
Clostridial disease.
Vaccine is pence so always worth doing in my opinion. Makes me laugh when people ask me if I get trouble with Blackleg and that’s why I vaccinate 🤦 I don’t get trouble because I vaccinate 👍

If you have a bad go with Blackleg the losses in one year can be more than the vaccine cost for a farming lifetime.
It's always the best animal as well.
The good doer
 

milkloss

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
East Sussex
I know black leg but considering clostridium covers a few diseases what would be the symptoms. Lost a couple of cows so far for no particular reason and they are grazing tight with straw for belly fill.

Had 7mm rain yesterday so hoping the grass will grow...... then it’ll be mag trouble!
 

primmiemoo

Member
Location
Devon
Generally, it's sudden onset gangrene, usually in a leg.

.


Quick death, but horrible. Costly, obviously.
 

Farmer Fin

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
Ok what does clostridal disease really mean or whats in a specific field that gives them it
Clostridial are a family of bacteria. Within that family you have blackleg, tetanus, pulpy kidney, blacks disease. In effect lots of things that kill livestock suddenly. Most of the clostridial family live in the environment / soil. Vaccines like bravoxin / covexin are really cheap and as someone else said pay back in no time if you know you have an issue.
 

goodevans

Member
We get it in bulls in sheds,normally when they are getting to maturity,(a week away from selling) it is said a bruise will set it off but cattle growing quickly seem to be most at risk.
 
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Buffalo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Herefordshire
As I’ve seen it shoulder or upper leg will swell fast, can be dead within hours, they’ll go of their leg/s very quickly. There will be a horrible coloured puss coming from any swelling, which might or probably is black. Nearly impossible to stop once they’ve got it. Managed to catch one early enough when we had an outbreak, after a week of a lot of meds, ended up with the same out come. Vaccinate everything now, always get the best one because the immune system can’t keep up with their growth.
 

Werzle

Member
Location
Midlands
Once you have had an outbreak you will never turn any youngstock out again without jabbing them, awful. Brovoxin isnt in short supply and costs pence, had a bad outbreak once and got all the calves in and gave them a brovoxin jab plus a double dose of penstrep. Most would advise you not to risk bruising them but i didnt loose another after. Those that wait and see usually loose alot more. Outbreaks are usually set off by soil disturbance or warm rain on dry ground
 

daveydiesel1

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co antrim
So more likely on a new reseed? Was reseeded last year but was good grass covering and they were only put out to it so wasnt short of grass
 

goodevans

Member
Once you have had an outbreak you will never turn any youngstock out again without jabbing them, awful. Brovoxin isnt in short supply and costs pence, had a bad outbreak once and got all the calves in and gave them a brovoxin jab plus a double dose of penstrep. Most would advise you not to risk bruising them but i didnt loose another after. Those that wait and see usually loose alot more. Outbreaks are usually set off by soil disturbance or warm rain on dry ground
Although we get it in the bulls we dont seem to have a problem with grazing steers and heifers so maybe coming in on soiled straw?
 

Werzle

Member
Location
Midlands
Although we get it in the bulls we dont seem to have a problem with grazing steers and heifers so maybe coming in on soiled straw?
Never heard of cattle inside getting it tbh , its usually associated with grazing ground near watercourses and places that lie damp/flood. Any fields that you see mushrooms growing on would be candidates for blackleg. You sure the bulls are not dying from botulism, symptoms and rate of death are similiar
 
Never heard of cattle inside getting it tbh , its usually associated with grazing ground near watercourses and places that lie damp/flood. Any fields that you see mushrooms growing on would be candidates for blackleg. You sure the bulls are not dying from botulism, symptoms and rate of death are similiar
We get it in one particular shed. Took farm on in 2000 all ok , cleaned out FMD 2001 ,ok for a few years and now we get occassional outbreaks in yearling dairy hefs
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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