Blackgrass after two year Spring break

willy

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Rutland
There are other alternative crops where useful reductions in BG numbers can be achieved while maintaining a production margin.
ie Linseed etc.

Only time will tell, but I think linseed is poor for bg control.

Too be honest osr is the best control, start with centurion max then crawler and finish off with kerb.
 

Tractor Boy

Member
Location
Suffolk
Only time will tell, but I think linseed is poor for bg control.

Too be honest osr is the best control, start with centurion max then crawler and finish off with kerb.
I don't agree with OSR. Worst crop for blackgrass. Centurion max doesn't work(this field never saw it til the sugar beet, and half the blackgrass survived!). Crawler and Kerb rely on the winter. How can putting a crop in in August for 12 months help blackgrass control.
 

shakerator

Member
Location
LINCS
I don't agree with OSR. Worst crop for blackgrass. Centurion max doesn't work(this field never saw it til the sugar beet, and half the blackgrass survived!). Crawler and Kerb rely on the winter. How can putting a crop in in August for 12 months help blackgrass control.
Spring efficacy is consistently worse than autumn with centurion max
 

Douglasmn

Member
Surely if what all the experts and trails tell us is to be believed then if you've been Claydon drilling all the seed will be on surface, so plough up clean soil from 10/12 inches down then you'll have a totally clean start?
 

Douglasmn

Member
Surely if what all the experts and trails tell us is to be believed then if you've been Claydon drilling all the seed will be on surface, so plough up clean soil from 10/12 inches down then you'll have a totally clean start?
 

Tractor Boy

Member
Location
Suffolk
Surely if what all the experts and trails tell us is to be believed then if you've been Claydon drilling all the seed will be on surface, so plough up clean soil from 10/12 inches down then you'll have a totally clean start?
Ploughing isn't an answer. It was ploughed before the beet for the first time in 5 years. The wheat before beet had some blackgrass which should have been ploughed down. The beet should've been clean but had blackgrass!!
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Surely if what all the experts and trails tell us is to be believed then if you've been Claydon drilling all the seed will be on surface, so plough up clean soil from 10/12 inches down then you'll have a totally clean start?
Depends on the ploughing! and clay soil can have cracks deeper than ploughing so seeds can fall to depth anyway, ploughing dilutes the problem which can be a big help.
 

franklin

New Member
I find linseed pretty bobbins for actual BG control. But like spring crops in general, you dont get the yield loss from the BG in the crop. Spring barley suffers very little yield penalty from a bit of BG in it, whereas it gets decimated by wild oats left in the crop / removed late on. Spring beans similarly seem to cope with BG. I dont think *any* spring crops offer a different chemical control, or will actually reduce seed return. Perhaps spring oats would be my pick. No spring crops are nice for roguing in, although I am *optamistic* that we will be able to mechanically control it in linseed if I get the welder out this winter.
 

Douglasmn

Member
Depends on the ploughing! and clay soil can have cracks deeper than ploughing so seeds can fall to depth anyway, ploughing dilutes the problem which can be a big help.
Is clay type soil what really makes control difficult? Because of the cracks? So lighter soils much easier to control BG?
 

franklin

New Member
So lighter soils much easier to control BG?
Yup.

Cold, wet clay = bad.
If you can go out on Christmas day with the plough and press, with brother straight behind drilling spring barley with the combi, then you wont have BG. And if you do, something is wrong or you have titsed it up.

Tin hat on.
 

Douglasmn

Member
Yup.

Cold, wet clay = bad.
If you can go out on Christmas day with the plough and press, with brother straight behind drilling spring barley with the combi, then you wont have BG. And if you do, something is wrong or you have titsed it up.

Tin hat on.
Reassuring to hear. If BG ever makes it this far north shouldn't have any bother on this boy's ground.
 

Timbo1080

Member
Location
Somerset
Dirtyish wheat crop, stubble ploughed to 8 inches (BG will surely be in some proportion throughout the whole 8", with the majority at the bottom of the furrow). Beet will have been relatively clean, I'm sure. Cracks, each year will allow some to come through, but as @Feldspar said ("I think maximal disturbance at drilling, particularly if you are bringing up soil from below the top two inches will not help.).....The level of disturbance that a Claydon makes at drilling will not help. Couple that with the leading leg stirring up the BG well down in the soil profile, and I'm not surprised it's come back.
Spring cropping, IMHO offers little to choose when it come to competition from the crop, and is much more down to the very nature of the drilling taking place at the latter end of the Bg germination window.
 

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Project Lamport 2020

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Project Lamport, now in its seventh year, is the UK’s leading R&D trials event. The original concept aimed to develop a cultural approach to blackgrass control, but has since evolved over the years. The site now explores improving soil health, as well as a comprehensive research project that investigates the impact of cultivations, compaction and cover crops on soil structure, organic matter and microbiology.

Expect weekly updates on Project Lamport, allowing you to participate in the entire journey rather than just the final product. These updates conclude with the official Project Lamport site demonstration and a live Q&A with our experts on the 15th of July.

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