BOM salt

Hilly

Member
I bought couple of ton today to spread on some sh!t land as apparently it sweetens grass and makes stock eat it . Any one tried it ? I always thought salt killed grass lol 😂
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
I’ve bought Ag Salt in 600kg bags on a few occasions for just that job. Last lot was £110/t iirc, and spreading it on the grass means sodium levels in the grass should be elevated, raising intakes.

I’m not entirely convinced it made much difference tbh, but certainly going to be more effective than throwing a few lumps of overpriced rock salt about imo. If you want Himalayan Rock salt there are cheaper (& less pushy) sources, @[email protected] ‘s product is just as good and half the price. After all, it’s just lumps of salt hacked out of a contaminated seam in the Himalayas…
 
I spread a few tonnes of road salt on our paddocks a few years ago. I later found out that was far too much!
Christ, we didn’t half grow some grass that year and the sheep loved it. We had millions of mushrooms too.
I tried it again two years ago but it didn’t seem to make quite as much difference, maybe just the year, but I’m certain it did some good.
 

Hilly

Member
I’ve bought Ag Salt in 600kg bags on a few occasions for just that job. Last lot was £110/t iirc, and spreading it on the grass means sodium levels in the grass should be elevated, raising intakes.

I’m not entirely convinced it made much difference tbh, but certainly going to be more effective than throwing a few lumps of overpriced rock salt about imo. If you want Himalayan Rock salt there are cheaper (& less pushy) sources, @[email protected] ‘s product is just as good and half the price. After all, it’s just lumps of salt hacked out of a contaminated seam in the Himalayas…
Is agg salt different to bom s salt ? This product is from zero to 8 mm for spreading .
 

Bald Rick

Moderator
Livestock Farmer
Location
Anglesey
I’ve bought Ag Salt in 600kg bags on a few occasions for just that job. Last lot was £110/t iirc, and spreading it on the grass means sodium levels in the grass should be elevated, raising intakes.

I’m not entirely convinced it made much difference tbh, but certainly going to be more effective than throwing a few lumps of overpriced rock salt about imo. If you want Himalayan Rock salt there are cheaper (& less pushy) sources, @[email protected] ‘s product is just as good and half the price. After all, it’s just lumps of salt hacked out of a contaminated seam in the Himalayas

Excuse me BUT I have licked that seam in situ ..............

(True but the salt isn't really in the Himalayas but the Salt Range in the Punjab in Pakistan

1625033748491.png

)
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
Is agg salt different to bom s salt ? This product is from zero to 8 mm for spreading .

That’s about the size range of Ag Salt. I use similar spreader settings as for 0:24:24, as it looks pretty similar, and it spreads about right at that. I put it on grassland at 1 cwt/ac, and on beet at a much higher rate.

BOM always claim their salt is somehow better, but it’s just the Sodium you want that ‘sweetens’ grass. The trace elements (or impurities) are at such a low level as to be irrelevant, if you have any kind of deficiency.
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
Long time since I did chemistry, but surely Potash would be better for the grass. In this situation. Seem to remember some plants, particularly Beet family can substitute sodium for potassium and since they love both salt is the cheaper.
One word of warning about salt, is that is is a de- flocculant ( the opposite to lime) so should be used with extreme caution on heavy soils
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
Dairy boys use it to sweaten grass that has been slurried to death. You would have been better using slag imo
I remember a neighbour who was a very early adopter of a slurry system. They complained that the cows were not grazing the pasture near the dairy. That was getting virtually all the manure on it and the cows would sooner walk 500 yards than touch the very lush pasture on the doorstep. We certainly never had this issue , despite using very heavy amount of N
 

Hesstondriver

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Huntingdon
I've read that a plant can utilise a proportion of Salt - (Sodium Na) instead of Potash (K) in its and that its due the elements being next to each other on the periodic table. it sort of makes sense to me but it came from someone selling Ag salt too so i'm skeptical.

However it should increase palitibility and intakes. whether its economic to do so is a different matter
 
Location
Ceredigion
Index in this field is over 4.
We never put slurry on it only composted FYM as it has a better P to K ratio
View attachment 970872
Ready to go later in summer
It's even Red tractor compliant with a fence 🙄
Which index is over 4, are you not getting close to lock up, just thinking aloud here , feel free to put me straight


"Where grass and tillage crops are grown on index 4 soils it is recommended to omit P for a number of years (2 to 3 years) and then re-sample to monitor changes over time".
 

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