BOM salt

Sid

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South Molton
Ive go some road salt in the shed, is it any use spreading that
Go well with the slag.
No analysis 👍
Which index is over 4, are you not getting close to lock up, just thinking aloud here , feel free to put me straight


"Where grass and tillage crops are grown on index 4 soils it is recommended to omit P for a number of years (2 to 3 years) and then re-sample to monitor changes over time".
If you read the whole thread I posted it's over 4 for K.
I believe K is used for lignin production is plants, hence why a high K index means tough unpalatable grass
 

Hilly

Member
I’ve bought Ag Salt in 600kg bags on a few occasions for just that job. Last lot was £110/t iirc, and spreading it on the grass means sodium levels in the grass should be elevated, raising intakes.

I’m not entirely convinced it made much difference tbh, but certainly going to be more effective than throwing a few lumps of overpriced rock salt about imo. If you want Himalayan Rock salt there are cheaper (& less pushy) sources, @[email protected] ‘s product is just as good and half the price. After all, it’s just lumps of salt hacked out of a contaminated seam in the Himalayas…
It’s very similar price to that so it’s not dear.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
I've read that a plant can utilise a proportion of Salt - (Sodium Na) instead of Potash (K) in its and that its due the elements being next to each other on the periodic table. it sort of makes sense to me but it came from someone selling Ag salt too so i'm skeptical.

However it should increase palitibility and intakes. whether its economic to do so is a different matter

I was led to believe that was the case too.
Conversely, if the plant has replaced some of the K with Na, the stem will supposedly be weaker too, so it will fall over more easily.
 

Hilly

Member
I've read that a plant can utilise a proportion of Salt - (Sodium Na) instead of Potash (K) in its and that its due the elements being next to each other on the periodic table. it sort of makes sense to me but it came from someone selling Ag salt too so i'm skeptical.

However it should increase palitibility and intakes. whether its economic to do so is a different matter
At a fiver an acre it’s not a big loss if it dose no good , I’ve a twenty acre patch of hill nothing ever grazes , worth 100 quid isn’t it ?
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
At a fiver an acre it’s not a big loss if it dose no good , I’ve a twenty acre patch of hill nothing ever grazes , worth 100 quid isn’t it ?

That’s the theory I worked on too.

It would perhaps be interesting to half the 20ac, then see if all the stock only graze on one side? Otherwise you won’t know if it did make any difference.
 

Hilly

Member
That’s the theory I worked on too.

It would perhaps be interesting to half the 20ac, then see if all the stock only graze on one side? Otherwise you won’t know if it did make any difference.
It’s part of a 500 acre block so if it works and they graze it I will see them on it , if not they will just walk around it as they do now .
 

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Five nature-recovery projects spanning 100,000ha launched

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

Image-source-Savills-field-640x360.jpg
Five nature-recovery projects spanning nearly 100,000ha across the West Midlands, Cambridgeshire, the Peak District, Norfolk and Somerset have been announced by the government and Natural England today (Thursday, May 26).

This is the equivalent in size to all 219 current National Reserves.

The aim of the projects is to deliver nature recovery at a landscape scale, helping to tackle biodiversity loss, climate change and improve public health and well-being.

All five projects will make a significant contribution towards the national delivery of the international commitment to protect at least 30% of land and...
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