Brussel Sprout Aftermath

Just heard that there are likely to be brussel sprouts grown right next door to me next year. Anyone on here had experience of grazing the aftermath with lambs? Rough ideas of how lamb days/acre? Just thought it might be a good opportunity.

How are they to be harvested.
If machine picked then there will be quite a lot of rubbish on the ground but it will not last very long. It takes a while for them to get on it, unless they have been on rape or kale before.
In the old days when they were hand picked there was a lot of feed and it would last for ages.
 

yellowbelly

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
N.Lincs
Just heard that there are likely to be brussel sprouts grown right next door to me next year. Anyone on here had experience of grazing the aftermath with lambs? Rough ideas of how lamb days/acre? Just thought it might be a good opportunity.
It'll depend how they're harvested.
m
Machine, or stalks cut and carted to packhouse for stripping, or hand picked in field.

Sometimes there's no market for 'em and you get the lot :)

Edit. see @Frank-the-Wool beat me to it :D
 
How are they to be harvested.
If machine picked then there will be quite a lot of rubbish on the ground but it will not last very long. It takes a while for them to get on it, unless they have been on rape or kale before.
In the old days when they were hand picked there was a lot of feed and it would last for ages.
It'll depend how they're harvested.
m
Machine, or stalks cut and carted to packhouse for stripping, or hand picked in field.

Sometimes there's no market for 'em and you get the lot :)

Edit. see @Frank-the-Wool beat me to it :D
I would assume that they'll be machine picked. I'm trying to wrack my brains as to whether they leave stalks standing around here but I don't think so and I believe that the stalks are the best bit. I certainly have seen store lambs on aftermath in this area though. Ewes would probably be alright on it as well? It would be right next door and I even have a gate into the field.
 

yellowbelly

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
N.Lincs
I would assume that they'll be machine picked. I'm trying to wrack my brains as to whether they leave stalks standing around here but I don't think so and I believe that the stalks are the best bit. I certainly have seen store lambs on aftermath in this area though. Ewes would probably be alright on it as well? It would be right next door and I even have a gate into the field.
This is how they harvest 'em in Lincolnshire.
Stalks are cut, fed into machine and all the waste drops out the back. If it's wet and the carts run about all over it some gets paddled into the ground.

Whatever they do in the field next door, it'd be churlish not to open that gate ;)
 
This is how they harvest 'em in Lincolnshire.
Stalks are cut, fed into machine and all the waste drops out the back. If it's wet and the carts run about all over it some gets paddled into the ground.

Whatever they do in the field next door, it'd be churlish not to open that gate ;)
Looks like there's plenty of stuff left lying about 👍

I see them working away regularly in the winter months as I'm driving to work at 0500. Getting up at that time is no fun but at least I've got the radio and heating on...
 
Just heard that there are likely to be brussel sprouts grown right next door to me next year. Anyone on here had experience of grazing the aftermath with lambs? Rough ideas of how lamb days/acre? Just thought it might be a good opportunity.
Pulpy kidney black leg be carful grass run back needed I’d say
 

scottish-lleyn

Member
Mixed Farmer
I havnt grazed them no but plenty around me do yes dont think the aftermath lasts long and they get prtty dirty but if you get a bit with whole plants its a winner. Give me a box of cartridges and i will come and blast them across the field for you.🤣
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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