Buying at Auction

Reece1503

New Member
Hi just a small time sheep man here who buys a few tups and gimmers at auction after reading posts on the forum especially the beef and lamb price tracker well in name maybe not practice which buy the way I find very entertaining, I just thought it would be good to hear how some of you men who are buying regularly deal with auctioneers to get best prices and not let them get the upper hand when buying around ring
 

Hilly

Member
Hi just a small time sheep man here who buys a few tups and gimmers at auction after reading posts on the forum especially the beef and lamb price tracker well in name maybe not practice which buy the way I find very entertaining, I just thought it would be good to hear how some of you men who are buying regularly deal with auctioneers to get best prices and not let them get the upper hand when buying around ring
Bid slow , the slower the bidding the lower the numbers , your job to slow auctioneer down his job to speed you up, and try make sure you are getting bid against not just bids from the sparrows .
 
If the biddings coming to an end and your the last man in ,as a prompt for the auctioneer to bring his hammer down, write the price and lot number on your card.

( rarely works if I’m honest)
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
Bid slow , the slower the bidding the lower the numbers , your job to slow auctioneer down his job to speed you up, and try make sure you are getting bid against not just bids from the sparrows .

Not necessarily. Bidding slowly also gives your competition the impression that you’re nearly busted, encouraging them to bid ‘just once more’.

I guess it depends on whether you want a particular animal badly enough (like rams or bulls), or whether it’s just a store beast to make a margin on, with another along in a minute.
 

Werzle

Member
Location
Midlands
I like to jump in late , bid fast and stop abruptly when i have hit my valuation without giving a hint im going too. Best advice is dont be half asleep, dont leave your brains at home and dont treat it like a competition. Auctioneers love to stick it to wet behind the ears bidders, they usually give the stare to a main bidder to roll you on but its all in the game. Console yourself that most of the time your bidding against people who arent spending there own money!
 
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som farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
somerset
If you feel he's running you, bid fast and furious, then drop out, on a few lots you don't want, and slow right down on the lots you do want, be unpredictable.
But is not only the auctioneer that can run you, some of the dealers are worse, they want to squeeze out competition, and if a weak auctioneer, they can be the death of the trade.
The craftiest auctioneer l knew, used to ask for the amount he valued them at, store cattle, if no takers, he would drop £200, load of hands shot up, bang bang bang bang, he would be, at his price, in 30 seconds.
Some auctioneers are/were notorious for running people, some could carry it off well, everyone expected it, and allowed for it, others just looked stupid, and have to start again, embarrassing, and some never learn.
The good auctioneers, can become a 'character', highly respected, and trusted by sellers, and buyers, and others will never be regarded, as anything other than shite.
 

Anymulewilldo

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Cheshire
Not necessarily. Bidding slowly also gives your competition the impression that you’re nearly busted, encouraging them to bid ‘just once more’.

I guess it depends on whether you want a particular animal badly enough (like rams or bulls), or whether it’s just a store beast to make a margin on, with another along in a minute.
True, I bid fast and stop suddenly when I hit my mark. It also messes with those bidding against you’s heads
 

AftonShepherd

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
East Ayrshire
I tend to bid quickly once I start to show others I mean business but always know when I'm stopping. Can always think about one more without getting carried away.

I also try not to stop twice at the same amount even with similar beasts so the auctioneer doesn't get to know my budget.

We ought some Beltex tups a bitbelow budget at Carlisle once and bid on a "cheapie" for a spare. When we dropped out, the auctioneer had to admit it was him that had been against us lol .
 

som farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
somerset
perhaps the most important point, is to set the limit, you are prepared to pay, and stop at it.
we tend to buy, on an average, buy a cheap one, you can afford a slightly dearer one, the average price is kept to.
We buy a fair amount at auction, and if the auctioneer is good, he knows exactly what you buy, and price, and will look at you, to see if interest is there.
Went to one sale, where the auctioneer, wouldn't take my bids, on 1 run, so stopped bidding, when asked afterwards, he said, you really didn't want to buy them, enough said.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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