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Chicken muck and no till

Discussion in 'Direct Drilling Crops & Agronomy' started by ajd132, Aug 17, 2018.

  1. ajd132

    ajd132 Member

    Location:
    Suffolk
    is it illegal to spread 5t/ha of chicken manure on stubble then leave it? Will it be lost to the atmosphere?
     
  2. No. Yes. But it would be if composted too
     
  3. Still Farming

    Still Farming Member

    Location:
    Glamorgan Wales
    See what the public say joining you ?
     
  4. Fuzzy

    Fuzzy Member

    Location:
    Bedfordshire
    Not legal and not good farming PR !!!!
     
    Still Farming likes this.
  5. farmerm

    farmerm Member

    Location:
    Shropshire
    Much better if you spread it on my farm and I will plough it in for you (y)
     
    Still Farming likes this.
  6. Clive

    Clive Staff Member

    Location:
    Lichfield
    Compost it and spread next year ?
     
  7. ajd132

    ajd132 Member

    Location:
    Suffolk
    I get 3000 tonnes a year so will have to just run the joker over it shallow
     
  8. Clive

    Clive Staff Member

    Location:
    Lichfield

    we use the carrier in a similar way when required, as long as you're not ripping stubble out I don't think it does any harm to the soil like "proper" cultivation does
     
    DieselRob likes this.
  9. General-Lee

    General-Lee Member

    Location:
    Devon
    As an aside we’ve been taking chicken shy and piling it ready to be spread in a few weeks, how does that work granted not as bad as stirring up and spreading but certainly a strong waft coming off it.
     
  10. tw15

    tw15 Member

    Location:
    DORSET
    Spread a few days before rain and then give it a light discing and the rain will wash it in . ideally one day ahead of the rain .
     
  11. DieselRob

    DieselRob Member

    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    Is it correct that it has to be incooperated within 12hrs now not 24 as previous?
     
  12. tw15

    tw15 Member

    Location:
    DORSET
    Think so if in nvz area .
     
  13. David_A

    David_A Member

    Location:
    Fife
    Spread on a cover crop, no need for incorporation then. Less losses to air that way also. Makes cover grow like on steroids both up and down the way.
    Alternatively try the fashionable straw harrow.
     
    Brisel likes this.
  14. Hindsight

    Hindsight Member

    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    http://www.planet4farmers.co.uk/Manner.aspx

    You may well already use the MANNER software in which case apologies and ignore this post. But if not it is the spreadsheet calculations behind advice in RB209. You can use it to assess crop availability / ammonia losses etc by playing out application scenarios.
     
  15. General-Lee

    General-Lee Member

    Location:
    Devon
    As in a growing crop??
     
    Brisel likes this.
  16. David_A

    David_A Member

    Location:
    Fife
    Yes, exactly that. Nutrients will be cycled through cover crop. Should be a win for all sides.
     
  17. General-Lee

    General-Lee Member

    Location:
    Devon
    How come that’s allowed but on stubbles has to be incorporated?
     
  18. Deutzdx3

    Deutzdx3 Member

    Incorporating really makes dd farmers upset as it means throwing a little soil around. At least it doesn’t require ploughing in.
     
    General-Lee likes this.
  19. Brisel

    Brisel Member

    Location:
    Dorset
    The theory behind that is minimising the risk of leaching with no crop present to take it in. Just a rule invented by a bureaucrat.

    Define incorporation? Straw rake or chain harrows or rolls... ;)
     
    David_A and General-Lee like this.
  20. David_A

    David_A Member

    Location:
    Fife
    My take on this... if you can put hen pen on a crop in the spring with no need for incorporation, the same should apply in the autumn on a cover crop. Maybe it depends on how willing you are to test the rules.
     
    General-Lee likes this.

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