Clarkson on the nail again?

delilah

Member
Very little of which actually gets 'chucked away'. Other uses are found for it, some being very very profitable such as pet food. Some less so, like bread going for cattle feed. Very very little gets wasted at this level. By far the greatest wastage is at the home storage and cooking stage.

For sure, i'm not saying it goes to landfill, but we are a long, long way away from going short if we can afford to bake bread to feed to bullocks.
 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
in fact, I'd consider in this instance he is a 'columnist'.
A journalist shouldn't be extrapolating, merely reporting.
(i think)
in wikchapeada hes stated as being, amongst other things 'a farmer ' :unsure: and also mentions that hes dismissive of renewables ,
Lol.
just another clever talker with no practical nous. ,Worlds got way too many of them already...
 
First best thing that we can't do, is to have sent Ukraine all the weapons it needs/has asked for, and to have trained them on Western weapons systems right at the start of the war so they'd be closer to using them today.

Seeing as we can't do that, the next best thing is to f**king do it today. Instead of this inane waffling and handwringing.

Worry beads and shrill calls for ceasefires won't solve this war. Weapons and ammunition in the hands of intelligent folk who WANT to defend their country will.
 
He and Xi have said as much.
Unfortunately it’s not worked out the way they thought it would i.e eastern Ukraine secedes to Russian control within days of the Russians moving in.
China is a major importer of LNG and even if he is bestest buddies with Putin any sizeable gas pipeline into the country is years away and Russian LNG plants being constructed are built in European technology which the companies have pulled their support and licenses for. Yes they have coal but they fell out with the Aussies for their meddling in politics in the country and didnt like getting called out for it, not a good tactic if you use more energy than you can produce domestically.
Europes biggest issue is that they did not listen to Trump when he told Merkel and her cronies to build LNG import terminals, yes he was the statesman and businessman trying to find a home for’associated’ gas produced with their shale oil boom which is flared off at the separation sites.
As stated in this thread there is plenty gas in the world, just in the wrong place and a lot of people are going to pay for our elected officials lack of foresight no matter what country you live in.
The chaos that the Ukraine war and subsequent energy crisis has brought will likely lead to world war if it leads to a food crisis globally. What is happening in Sri Lanka may be just the starter for five, but let’s hope not.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
The chaos that the Ukraine war and subsequent energy crisis has brought will likely lead to world war if it leads to a food crisis globally. What is happening in Sri Lanka may be just the starter for five, but let’s hope not.
It's kicking off in Iran also with a sudden removal of subsidies on many foods including bread which has seen prices rise by up to 300% in a matter of days.
 

Lowland1

Member
Mixed Farmer
A question Clarkson asks is will Africa be able to afford £300 a tonne wheat. Last October pre crisis I sold mine off the field at £275 a tonne in March I harvested and sold at £315 and now its £380 a tonne bread sells here at 70 pence a loaf . I am growing more wheat because the price is good and it suits my rotation but the difference between Africa and the UK will be the cost of the flour in the loaf in the UK the flour will be just a fraction of the cost whilst in Africa flour will be the greater proportion. In Africa we are used to the fact that people are poor so can only afford to spend some much ( which is generally 50%+ of their income ) on food. A 3 kg cabbage leaves the farm here at 10p. Last month BP made its biggest ever profit not because suddenly oil has become harder to find and costs more to extract but because their is perceived shortage caused by world events so it can put its prices as high as it can until demand starts to decline. It's the same with wheat if Cargill can frighten the life out of the world then whatever commission it takes on moving wheat goes up. I wonder how many farmers think how can I farm better with less fertilizer rather than the price is going up I better get some now no matter the price. It's a bit like toilet paper better stock up. Tough times are ahead and people better adapt for sure but an awful lot of this is driven by corporations looking to increase their profits.
As for northern Kenya they are always in famine because they spend their time shooting each other and stealing their cattle.
 

Lowland1

Member
Mixed Farmer
It's kicking off in Iran also with a sudden removal of subsidies on many foods including bread which has seen prices rise by up to 300% in a matter of days.
Easily solved by allowing Iran to export gas and oil to Europe which it is offering to do. Thus increasing its income and allowing it to buy more expensive wheat which it can then subsidise reducing the risk of instability which threatens Israel and the west. All Geopolitical manoeuvring.it is friends with Putin and can get wheat from them easily and at no risk of sanctions because it's already under sanctions but by supplying oil and gas to the west it gets out of sanctions.
 

Hfd Cattle

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Hereford
All this 'Clarkson Kicking' achieves nothing ......
He has raised up some very valid points that probably most of is have been thinking for quite sometime !
Luckily for us ,whether we like him or not, he has a platform which is allowing him to raise these points in the public domain .....something which British Ag has had missing for quite some yrs !!
I've sad this before ....love him or loathe him I would rather have him fight for us rather than against us !!
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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