Classics Earning their keep.

Mur Huwcun

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North West Wales
To release the clutch you would be better off getting the engine as warm as possible and driving up and down a field with pedal jammed down jabbing the brakes on and off, better still if you can drag something heavyish with you
 

Full of bull(s)

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
I'm too coose for you lot.....I'd put the nose up against a firm wall and hold the clutch down......something will give, just fingers crossed it's the clutch not the wall👍😂😂
I did that with a David brown 1200 once against a bale stack....except it started to climb it and the stop wasn’t connected...did I s##t myself
 

DevonianRedneck

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
west Devon
I did that with a David brown 1200 once against a bale stack....except it started to climb it and the stop wasn’t connected...did I s##t myself

Did it stop climbing on its own? Or did you manage to knock it out of gear?

Or did it work and the clutch free'ed off in time😂

Hopefully it didn't go over backwards😔


In all seriousness..for clarity I would not recommend this method for safety reasons😉

I used to have an old 5000 as a loader tractor...and if parked for more than a couple days the clutch would stick every bleddy time,

So until we started tieing the clutch down, we always used to park it with the bale spike in a stack of bales, so you could start it, in gear with clutch depressed....it would spin for a second or two and then the clutch would free off and you were good to go👍
 

spin cycle

Member
Location
north norfolk
nash 885xl with 'new' to me jd 550....just beat the rain :)

P1040881.JPG
 

X344chap

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Central Scotland
Am I right in thinking that you could upgrade them to the wet brakes of later versions with the right bits from a breaker without having to change the rear axle? Something tells me you could
Yes you can put the wet brake castings on to older leylands but you need to tap them and feed oil into them from the back end i think. Not cheap second hand either.
 

35% of English and Welsh farmers possibly/probably depressed

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

The Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution (RABI) has today, Thursday, October 14, published the findings of The Big Farming Survey, which shows 35% of English and Welsh farmers are either possibly or probably depressed.

The survey, based on over 15,000 responses, concentrates on the health and well-being of the farming community in England and Wales in the 2020s.

The Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution (RABI) is a national charity that provides support to the farming community across England and Wales.

Mental health​


Mental well-being, the survey notes, describes our ability to cope with the ‘ups and downs’ of everyday life.

According to the survey, 14% of the farming community is ‘possibly depressed’ while...
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