Claydon after tatties. Advice

NeepClatter

Member
Amateur farmer here, making plans for this year, will be putting the new Claydon (3MF mounted/no front discs) in after fields rented out for tatties and peas, will be drilling WW .Will it go straight in or should I be looking at mounting something on the front linkage that can do a bit levelling/trash cutting? Thinking something like this? http://www.cousinsofemneth.co.uk/cultivators_disc_tiller.html

I’ve got a He-Va LD subsoiler but not sure if fields would be better getting disc levelled in one pass while drilling as opposed to running a subsoiler prior to drill hoping subsoiler will provide levelling result/effect ?
Also with loose tilth from tatties/peas should I run the Cambridge rollers over to firm up prior to putting Claydon in ? Thoughts?
 

melted welly

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
DD9.
Think the trash will be problem straight in with a tine. Shaws trail badly behind Suffolk coulter on 1pass.

I’ll karat at 45degrees to beds then 1pass (disc coulter) same way as beds, or it’s too rough for sprayer.

you’d def want to some kid of cultivation 1st to lift the wheelings and do a bit of levelling.
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
As others say if there are wheeling they must be sorted first. Then the trash will depend on variety topper and conditions at harvest. A variety like cara will be like trying to drill through plastic string!
 

johnboy87

Member
Unlikely, seen a 4m used after a relatively dry maize harvest and that was ok but only ok seed depth was all over the place as it has no contour following between the tines. After spuds it wouldn't surprise me to find some seed 4 or inches deep while others are on the surface. I like the concept but you need level fields to run it
 

NeepClatter

Member
Understood, so what implement(s) would be best ( brand/model) for leveling the field up, sorting the wheelings and dealing with the shaws/trash to get it to a point where I can put the claydon in. I’m new to this and and in the process of getting the right gear for the job. I have the LD subsoiler for taking care of compaction but thats it on the cultivation implements front right now.
 

nick...

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
south norfolk
Understood, so what implement(s) would be best ( brand/model) for leveling the field up, sorting the wheelings and dealing with the shaws/trash to get it to a point where I can put the claydon in. I’m new to this and and in the process of getting the right gear for the job. I have the LD subsoiler for taking care of compaction but thats it on the cultivation implements front right now.
You need a plough
nick...
 

Fendt

Member
We have a He-Va Combi-Disc which has subsoiling legs followed by discs followed by packer roller. We run that straight into potato land with 12-14" subsoiling depth and then one pass with a combination drill with double disc coulters that deals with any remaining potato haulm. If it's wet then you need a plough.
 

eagleye

Member
Location
co down
3m Horsch Joker with TG bar 5 legs at an angle to level and rip up wheel tracks, if haulm is leathery it's trouble. This only works if reasonably dry, in wet conditions I would say plough might be best answer.
 

melted welly

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
DD9.
Similar to above, we use a karat at 45degrees then drill with the beds. That is a ph drill with disc coulters and following tines lifted or the shaws will trail.
 

KB6930

Member
Location
Borders
Direct/strip till drill next door and after tatties they drag a few machines through to level up but nothing to scatter the rows of stones about so in a dry summer you see all the old beds dying off .
Whereas we plough at 90 degrees to the beds to drag them around a bit then the power harrow scatters them again so it's not as obvious
 

RmfJ

Member
Location
Pembrokeshire
Direct/strip till drill next door and after tatties they drag a few machines through to level up but nothing to scatter the rows of stones about so in a dry summer you see all the old beds dying off .
Whereas we plough at 90 degrees to the beds to drag them around a bit then the power harrow scatters them again so it's not as obvious
No way are you ever going to restructure the ground again after a destoner has been through, people are just kidding themselves, ruination of land.
 
Last edited:

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
No way are ever going to restructure the ground again after destoner has been through, people are just kidding themselves, ruination of land.
its not just the destoner which kills the land, it is pulling tatties off with a 200HP tractors pulling 15 tonne trailers through a foot of slop in a wet time. No amount of cultivations can cure that in a hurry
 

JLLM

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Tyddewi
Direct/strip till drill next door and after tatties they drag a few machines through to level up but nothing to scatter the rows of stones about so in a dry summer you see all the old beds dying off .
Whereas we plough at 90 degrees to the beds to drag them around a bit then the power harrow scatters them again so it's not as obvious
Never really seen the stone rows in the following crop. I prefer to try not to disturb them, it's less to pick.
 

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Five nature-recovery projects spanning 100,000ha launched

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

Image-source-Savills-field-640x360.jpg
Five nature-recovery projects spanning nearly 100,000ha across the West Midlands, Cambridgeshire, the Peak District, Norfolk and Somerset have been announced by the government and Natural England today (Thursday, May 26).

This is the equivalent in size to all 219 current National Reserves.

The aim of the projects is to deliver nature recovery at a landscape scale, helping to tackle biodiversity loss, climate change and improve public health and well-being.

All five projects will make a significant contribution towards the national delivery of the international commitment to protect at least 30% of land and...
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