Claydon or Triton

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
Would like to open our drilling windows up with a mounted direct tine drill.
Claydon and triton I know are different designs/concepts but they are the two I would choose between.
any thoughts welcome
 

adam_farming

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
Having seen a mounted 3m claydon used here on med heavy clay, it is very heavy and when turning on the ends puts a lot of weight on the rear (250hp ish wheeled tractor). If you're trying to extend the drilling window then I'm guessing this means going in wetter conditions, so this doesn't seem like a great thing to be doing? Especially as the narrower width means a lot more headland turning compared to your 12m. Do you want to drill more acres or specifically drill later?

Standard TFF response by the way, ignore the question and imply you're doing it wrong based on my own specific niche experiences....
 

sjt01

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
North Norfolk
Would like to open our drilling windows up with a mounted direct tine drill.
Claydon and triton I know are different designs/concepts but they are the two I would choose between.
any thoughts welcome
Have you thought of a Sabre tine (Weaving's own machine, or their tines on something else). Nice and simple, cheap to run. It works well on our flinty land here where we get through a lot of wearing metal, goes nice and deep for beans.
 

Andrew K

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Essex
I would say Claydon or possibly Simtech.
Dont underestimate the value of that Claydon front loosening tine when soil conditions dictate as it can do a useful loosening job in situations directly after beet or spuds for example, even if you dont need it elsewhere in the rotation?
Most of the mounted tine drills will not DD all the time in truly heavy clay soils IMO. They are too light and block in wet trash and cover crops , or create a snotty slot that is paradise for slugs.
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
Having seen a mounted 3m claydon used here on med heavy clay, it is very heavy and when turning on the ends puts a lot of weight on the rear (250hp ish wheeled tractor). If you're trying to extend the drilling window then I'm guessing this means going in wetter conditions, so this doesn't seem like a great thing to be doing? Especially as the narrower width means a lot more headland turning compared to your 12m. Do you want to drill more acres or specifically drill later?

Standard TFF response by the way, ignore the question and imply you're doing it wrong based on my own specific niche experiences....
The problem is our big sprinter just doesn’t work when it’s wet, the packer blocks. Way before the soil is actually in a horrible state and I’ve seen Claydon’s running beautifully the same day. It’s more for winter beans and second wheat. We have compromised some establishment this year on some later drilled what as had to use the avatar into some chopped straw, and whilst the crop is okay it could have been quite abit better.
 

RobW

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Cambridge
Hi Adam,

We have a 6m Sabre tine (the newer one but with the metal tank) which we bough to get us out of bother when the GD would not go. It will be fine on your 8RX but it is seriously heavy (about 3.5m unladen). Our 8370 knows it's there and you need plenty of front weight. The plastic tank saves some kg but it's not a game changer. Last year we took the tyres off - the older model has them in front of the tines which is better. Our problem this year was with any straw on the surface it acts like a rake and just keeps pulling it until you lift at the end of the field, so we have some fairly impressive heaps around the farm.
The sabre tine with the front hopper is great but my understanding is that it is not a quick job to put it on.

Don't forget the fert spreader and spring tine but probably not in unworked land!

Feel free to come and have a look. I realise it is neither a Claydon or Triton so doesn't help with your actual question.
Regards
Rob
 

Robert

Member
Location
South East
Hi Adam,

We have a 6m Sabre tine (the newer one but with the metal tank) which we bough to get us out of bother when the GD would not go. It will be fine on your 8RX but it is seriously heavy (about 3.5m unladen). Our 8370 knows it's there and you need plenty of front weight. The plastic tank saves some kg but it's not a game changer. Last year we took the tyres off - the older model has them in front of the tines which is better. Our problem this year was with any straw on the surface it acts like a rake and just keeps pulling it until you lift at the end of the field, so we have some fairly impressive heaps around the farm.
The sabre tine with the front hopper is great but my understanding is that it is not a quick job to put it on.

Don't forget the fert spreader and spring tine but probably not in unworked land!

Feel free to come and have a look. I realise it is neither a Claydon or Triton so doesn't help with your actual question.
Regards
Rob

Useful insight thanks. Would love to hear from Triton users about the trash flow capability through its even greater number of tines per metre if i understand its design correctly, or perhaps their configuration cleverly avoids the problem? And yes - of course anything has a limit; the benchmark for me is currently the Claydon Hybrid....
 

Will 1594

Member
Arable Farmer
The problem is our big sprinter just doesn’t work when it’s wet, the packer blocks. Way before the soil is actually in a horrible state and I’ve seen Claydon’s running beautifully the same day. It’s more for winter beans and second wheat. We have compromised some establishment this year on some later drilled what as had to use the avatar into some chopped straw, and whilst the crop is okay it could have been quite abit better.
Have a look at making some thing like sjt has ,
lightweight ,does not look owt fancy ,but having seen it working ,
we on the look out for a 4/6 m drag frame to make similar
 

Bob lincs

Member
Arable Farmer
Hi Adam,

We have a 6m Sabre tine (the newer one but with the metal tank) which we bough to get us out of bother when the GD would not go. It will be fine on your 8RX but it is seriously heavy (about 3.5m unladen). Our 8370 knows it's there and you need plenty of front weight. The plastic tank saves some kg but it's not a game changer. Last year we took the tyres off - the older model has them in front of the tines which is better. Our problem this year was with any straw on the surface it acts like a rake and just keeps pulling it until you lift at the end of the field, so we have some fairly impressive heaps around the farm.
The sabre tine with the front hopper is great but my understanding is that it is not a quick job to put it on.

Don't forget the fert spreader and spring tine but probably not in unworked land!

Feel free to come and have a look. I realise it is neither a Claydon or Triton so doesn't help with your actual question.
Regards
Rob
We can put our front hopper sabretine on in about 20 mins .
 

BuskhillFarm

Member
Arable Farmer
I have been researching the claydon. My understanding is theyre more of a September drill than a November one. Go in late and they’ll give you a crop but also compaction.
 

ajd132

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Suffolk
I have been researching the claydon. My understanding is theyre more of a September drill than a November one. Go in late and they’ll give you a crop but also compaction.
I’ve seen them used really effectively into October around here. Why would it make more compaction out of any of the others out of interest?
 

sjt01

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
North Norfolk
Have a look at making some thing like sjt has ,
lightweight ,does not look owt fancy ,but having seen it working ,
we on the look out for a 4/6 m drag frame to make similar
20210809_170303[1].jpg


KV cultivator with Sabre points converted by @Bob lincs
 

Bob lincs

Member
Arable Farmer
Hi Bob,
Sounds like it might be a good bit of kit then - apologies! The weight and the smallish hopper capacity have been my biggest reservations of ours so yours must be great to use.
We use a 1.5 ton front hopper and that’s plenty to of weight on you front axle. It really is a nicely balanced outfit that can be used on a lot lighter tractor which is handy if the the conditions are not ideal .
 

BuskhillFarm

Member
Arable Farmer
I’ve seen them used really effectively into October around here. Why would it make more compaction out of any of the others out of interest?
Similar to low disturbance subsoiler in wet. But guess if it’s too wet even a plough/combie ain’t going to preform.
 

R&D

Member
The problem is our big sprinter just doesn’t work when it’s wet, the packer blocks. Way before the soil is actually in a horrible state and I’ve seen Claydon’s running beautifully the same day. It’s more for winter beans and second wheat. We have compromised some establishment this year on some later drilled what as had to use the avatar into some chopped straw, and whilst the crop is okay it could have been quite abit better.
Despite what Horsch say, I find a simple scraper transforms the Sprinter in the wet
 

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Five nature-recovery projects spanning 100,000ha launched

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

Image-source-Savills-field-640x360.jpg
Five nature-recovery projects spanning nearly 100,000ha across the West Midlands, Cambridgeshire, the Peak District, Norfolk and Somerset have been announced by the government and Natural England today (Thursday, May 26).

This is the equivalent in size to all 219 current National Reserves.

The aim of the projects is to deliver nature recovery at a landscape scale, helping to tackle biodiversity loss, climate change and improve public health and well-being.

All five projects will make a significant contribution towards the national delivery of the international commitment to protect at least 30% of land and...
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