Climate change issues: Is vertical farming the answer?

Carys

Member
Replacing soil, natural rainfall and sunlight from open sky with concrete, steel, glass, tarmac, plastic and the required massive infrastructure for heat, light, water storage, mechanisation, housing development for intensive cheap exploited labour etc etc.

Of course it will all be done in the name of 'climate change and the environment', but ultimately it will end up as more Green Washed corporate greed, exploiting 'the many' to benefit the 'absentee few'.

Your futuristic dream is my darkest dystopian nightmare. Please be careful what you wish for.


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Interesting opinion. Great to see a different perspective and definitely one I'll take into account :)
 

Boysground

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Wiltshire
I really have no idea what we are going to have to do, I am not convinced that vertical farming is really a solution for the planet.

I was out on my bike last weekend and went by a friends maize fields. It was the first time I have been past a field and wondered about the environmental impact of covering acres with plastic. I have never got it to add up financially for myself. Each to their own I suppose.

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Replacing soil, natural rainfall and sunlight from open sky with concrete, steel, glass, tarmac, plastic and the required massive infrastructure for heat, light, water storage, mechanisation, housing development for intensive cheap exploited labour etc etc.

Of course it will all be done in the name of 'climate change and the environment', but ultimately it will end up as more Green Washed corporate greed, exploiting 'the many' to benefit the 'absentee few'.

Your futuristic dream is my darkest dystopian nightmare. Please be careful what you wish for.


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What a terrible future the article shows, far better to eat pasture fed meat from local regen farms and we should eat tomatoes when they grow and ripen in the UK etc
 

Bogweevil

Member
Replacing soil, natural rainfall and sunlight from open sky with concrete, steel, glass, tarmac, plastic and the required massive infrastructure for heat, light, water storage, mechanisation, housing development for intensive cheap exploited labour etc etc.

Of course it will all be done in the name of 'climate change and the environment', but ultimately it will end up as more Green Washed corporate greed, exploiting 'the many' to benefit the 'absentee few'.

Your futuristic dream is my darkest dystopian nightmare. Please be careful what you wish for.


All of this will go as climate change makes Morocco and Almeria too hot and dry, being replaced by vertical farming units on supermarket roofs where consumers will cut and pick their own salads. No long distance lorries, no plastic, no pesticides, much less water use, no organic claptrap, renewable energy...

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I don't think broad acre farming need worry too much though.
 

Carys

Member
What is actually grown vertically at the moment? All I've seen is really high value crops like Wasabi and micro green salads.
Yes. Currently, UK companies tend to produce microgreens and salad leaves. There are some evident limitations; perhaps as the industry grows companies will be able to diversify in what they are producing.
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
North Yorkshire
Yes. Currently, UK companies tend to produce microgreens and salad leaves. There are some evident limitations; perhaps as the industry grows companies will be able to diversify in what they are producing.

Presumably, as the sector grows, the costs will fall as it becomes more competitive? That will hit producer margins too.
 

Carys

Member
Presumably, as the sector grows, the costs will fall as it becomes more competitive? That will hit producer margins too.
That is what is predicted. However, at the minute start-up costs and running costs are quite high. I think building consumer trust and engagement is a key next step and vital for future industry growth. Without, I believe scaling up and reducing costs will be difficult.
 
Yes. Currently, UK companies tend to produce microgreens and salad leaves. There are some evident limitations; perhaps as the industry grows companies will be able to diversify in what they are producing.
my gut instinct is that food, is more than just NPK, water, light and trace elements, there is a synergy of everything that produces a nutrient dense and rich product that nourishes us (and our micro biome), and that hydroponically produced food will keep us alive for a while but all the "usual" western diseases will proliferate as a result.
 

C.J

Member
Location
South Devon
my gut instinct is that food, is more than just NPK, water, light and trace elements,

That's right it needs Carbon dioxide and warmth aswell.

Strange isn't it that vertical farming , will keep plants at 20-25 centigrade and CO2 at 1200-1500 ppm ,so that they grow faster.

Mean while , there are people that believe if CO2 rises above 400 ppm and temperatures rise above 15 centigrade , there will be crop failures and famine.
 

35% of English and Welsh farmers possibly/probably depressed

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

The Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution (RABI) has today, Thursday, October 14, published the findings of The Big Farming Survey, which shows 35% of English and Welsh farmers are either possibly or probably depressed.

The survey, based on over 15,000 responses, concentrates on the health and well-being of the farming community in England and Wales in the 2020s.

The Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution (RABI) is a national charity that provides support to the farming community across England and Wales.

Mental health​


Mental well-being, the survey notes, describes our ability to cope with the ‘ups and downs’ of everyday life.

According to the survey, 14% of the farming community is ‘possibly depressed’ while...
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