CODD

Further a field

Member
Livestock Farmer
I think I ve bought in a problem which I ve been late diagnosing but it seems I ve a couple of bought in sheep with what i think is codd having looked at pics of the symptoms...i ve isolated the affected sheep what next in terms of treatment alymycin seems to have had no effect?
What's the chances of me having a wide spread problem in the rest of my flock non of the other 7 bought in ones seems to have it
 

Wood field

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South Pennines
I’d go a step further and cull them once they’re cured anyway. Not really something you want to risk hanging about amongst the flock.
Yes I see your point!
I had an awful time last year with bought in ewes and codd, footbath and alamycin did sweet nothing
Zactran sorted it within days , I kept the ewes and have only had two from that bunch re offend , they were sorted out with another jab and sent to cull
 

glensman

Member
Location
North Antrim
I think I ve bought in a problem which I ve been late diagnosing but it seems I ve a couple of bought in sheep with what i think is codd having looked at pics of the symptoms...i ve isolated the affected sheep what next in terms of treatment alymycin seems to have had no effect?
What's the chances of me having a wide spread problem in the rest of my flock non of the other 7 bought in ones seems to have it
Betamox works well for codd, oxytet has no effect on it.
 

Electricfencer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Cotswolds
I’d go a step further and cull them once they’re cured anyway. Not really something you want to risk hanging about amongst the flock.
I believe they build up immunity to codd. I have had 2 bad out breaks 3 years apart. The second time (last winter) almost every yearling upto 4 crop ewe had it and almost none of the old ewes had it. Bloody terrible and the one day gone.
 

Al R

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
West Wales
We had it a few years ago during tupping but no idea where it came in as we hadn’t bought in for a good few years!
footbathed with formalin double strength 4 days through, 2 days rest then 4 days through and repeated like that for 3 weeks, jabbed anything that struggled to walk with alamycin LA at first and no improvement after 3 days so did them all again with Betamox LA, stuck with Betamox after that - spoke to the vets while out TB testing at the time and they said they didn’t have a clue what to jab for it so use both independently and monitor which works and get back to them 🤦🏻‍♂️
I can see my neighbour has CODD in store lambs and he hasn’t seen them since he dropped them off, every person I see I tell them there not mine 🤣
 

JSmith

Member
Livestock Farmer
Had a bad year with it this time, had it in ewes 2020 then last spring/summer had it in the lambs! Formalin never touched it, jabbing with all the above didn’t touch it! Was very time consuming and depressing not being able to fix it!! Vet didn’t want to prescribe lincospectin because of antibiotic resistance but begged for it and they relented eventually, made up spray bottles with it an treated individually an jabbed with trymox, hundreds of them! Made an instant difference in two days!!
 

Jimdog1

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Devon
Lincospectin in my experience is the most cost effective and successful treatment. Big footbath and stand them in it for a few minutes and treat all groups with affected sheep. Can't be any worse for microbial resistance than bottles and bottles of all the antibiotics listed above. Lincospectin I think is the only thing we could all agree on that actually works? Any vet when presented with a flock with DD would prescribe on welfare grounds?
 

tepapa

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
North Wales
Spent many years doing lame sheep's feet for others. You'd be dealing with codd, scald and footrot.

I'd be using linco in a squirty bottle and alamycin injection.

The alamycin alone wouldn't touch the codd but it did work on footrot. Alamycin and linco together worked on codd, the alamycin helping with secondary infection and linco working on the codd.
The codd would go through the entire mob of lambs over a period of a few weeks. And treating just the lame ones, they'd get better as the next lot went lame or the lamb would go lame on a different foot. It would take a month but they'd come round to being ok and start fattening up again.
 

Yale

Member
Livestock Farmer
We had an issue which I got isolated down to the group of rams.

Loaded them all in the trailer and off to the vets,gave them 2x jabs of Apatil,a generic micotil 2 weeks apart and it sorted them.

They had horrendous feet at the time and I couldn’t believe how they cleared up.
 

JSmith

Member
Livestock Farmer
Lincospectin in my experience is the most cost effective and successful treatment. Big footbath and stand them in it for a few minutes and treat all groups with affected sheep. Can't be any worse for microbial resistance than bottles and bottles of all the antibiotics listed above. Lincospectin I think is the only thing we could all agree on that actually works? Any vet when presented with a flock with DD would prescribe on welfare grounds?
Well they didn’t want to give it me until I said I was either going out of business or blowing my brains out, then she said if you’ve got more than six chickens I can give you some!! Not sure if it was the thought of not getting paid due to me going out of business or my impending suicide that did it🤷‍♂️🤣
 

Jimdog1

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Devon
Well they didn’t want to give it me until I said I was either going out of business or blowing my brains out, then she said if you’ve got more than six chickens I can give you some!! Not sure if it was the thought of not getting paid due to me going out of business or my impending suicide that did it🤷‍♂️🤣
Any more than 6 chickens and she would have known for sure you were going out of business!😉
 

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Five nature-recovery projects spanning 100,000ha launched

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

Image-source-Savills-field-640x360.jpg
Five nature-recovery projects spanning nearly 100,000ha across the West Midlands, Cambridgeshire, the Peak District, Norfolk and Somerset have been announced by the government and Natural England today (Thursday, May 26).

This is the equivalent in size to all 219 current National Reserves.

The aim of the projects is to deliver nature recovery at a landscape scale, helping to tackle biodiversity loss, climate change and improve public health and well-being.

All five projects will make a significant contribution towards the national delivery of the international commitment to protect at least 30% of land and...
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