CODD

Jonp

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Gwent
I had a bad run of CODD three years ago during lambing. Treated ewes and have not had any CODD since as I lime the shed floor before lambing. Didn't cull the ewes either... replacements expensive and could bring in allsorts of other problems.
I think the main reasons I don't have CODD now is I eliminated footrot in a closed flock and quarantine and treat any bought in Rams. Lambing starts soon... here's hoping I don't have to eat my words!
 
I m going to cull a couple of rams affected but the rest are ewes due to lamb end of March would they be too far in lamb to cull?

Well I would keep them separate and sell them with their lambs or after weaning. But they wouldn't get to go around again. I have a closed flock in that I only buy in tups and I'm not in a sheep area so its easy. The same would apply if we were discussing Enzo. It is so much easier to keep sheep if you just keep pulling out the trouble makers and keep those that don't need work. Also as a grazier I don't then have to justify lame sheep on someone else's land.
 

JockCroft

Member
Livestock Farmer
Not sure if we have had CODD, but probably. As went back to having ewes 5 years ago, bought in various groups some 5 year olds and foot problems were many. Bought a Turn-over crate last summer so make handling especially back feet much more efficient. The point I would like to make is Prevention. I found that when started trimming in August, from 120 ewes and gimmers there were less than 10 which DID NOT require trimming off over grow hoof side wall,, some even younger one's it was across the sole. Luckily we had a dry summer period or soil and grass trapped would have led to much more infections. They were then foot bathed and stood for an hour on concrete a week later and at 3 weeks. A dozen or so that had bad rot were repeat bathed twice after another 4 and 8 days. So far so good, only a couple that I have noticed with a slight foot problem. They are both young home bred sheep.

My second point is that when looking for another Tup last autumn I was put off the majority of Texels as they were very open toed. A wide "V" ideal for grass friction to cause abrasion and start infections. Alarmingly the worst were ones claiming very high EBV's.
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
Well I would keep them separate and sell them with their lambs or after weaning. But they wouldn't get to go around again. I have a closed flock in that I only buy in tups and I'm not in a sheep area so its easy. The same would apply if we were discussing Enzo. It is so much easier to keep sheep if you just keep pulling out the trouble makers and keep those that don't need work. Also as a grazier I don't then have to justify lame sheep on someone else's land.

If, as a naive closed flock, you somehow introduced CODD, you would likely have a very large number of lame sheep initially. If you culled every one that went lame at that time, you’d not have many left, and little way of getting ewe numbers back up without going out and buying.

I’d keep those that recovered after treatment, but cull any that didn’t, or reoffended.
 

Bald n Grumpy

Member
Livestock Farmer
Not sure if we have had CODD, but probably. As went back to having ewes 5 years ago, bought in various groups some 5 year olds and foot problems were many. Bought a Turn-over crate last summer so make handling especially back feet much more efficient. The point I would like to make is Prevention. I found that when started trimming in August, from 120 ewes and gimmers there were less than 10 which DID NOT require trimming off over grow hoof side wall,, some even younger one's it was across the sole. Luckily we had a dry summer period or soil and grass trapped would have led to much more infections. They were then foot bathed and stood for an hour on concrete a week later and at 3 weeks. A dozen or so that had bad rot were repeat bathed twice after another 4 and 8 days. So far so good, only a couple that I have noticed with a slight foot problem. They are both young home bred sheep.

My second point is that when looking for another Tup last autumn I was put off the majority of Texels as they were very open toed. A wide "V" ideal for grass friction to cause abrasion and start infections. Alarmingly the worst were ones claiming very high EBV's.
The only prevention that works with codd is not buying or mixing With infected sheep. Codd mostly starts at the top of the hoof shell
 

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JCB has launched new Fastrac 4000 and 8000 Series tractors with an all-new electronics infrastructure which is claimed to deliver higher levels of performance. According to JCB, the new Fastrac iCon operator environment has three key features: iConfigure – creating a bespoke control experience for every operator iConnect – integrating advanced precision agriculture technology iControl – redefining operation through new driveline software The 175hp to 348hp (133kW to 260kW) Fastracs feature the new iCon armrest console and touch-screen display to provide flexibility in operator allocation and operator information, as well as a new transmission control strategy to enhance operator comfort and powertrain efficiency, says the manufacturer...
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