Commoner cattle causing damage

Curious

Member
I’m hoping to get some advice please. I live on a property that adjoins common land and the local farmer grazes their cattle on it. I have no issues with this at all, I love where I live. Recently though there is one new cow that loves our garden - twice breaking the chain pit across the driveway to stop them getting in. We can’t put gates up as the driveway is on a slope and exits onto a roadway, and can’t install a cattle grid as water meters are in the way. This new cow has now broken another chain and done hundreds of pounds of damage to newly planted roses and peonies (when it happened there was also a van across the driveway). Do I have any grounds to request some recompense from the farmer? I don’t want to fall out as I appreciate the history of commoners grazing their cattle but it’s costing me a fortune in chains and plants and I can’t see how it can get any better. Sorry for the long post - thought it best to say it all in one instead of generating lots of questions! Thanks
 

Wisconsonian

Member
Trade
You're better off getting some help to stop the cow damage from continuing. A powerful fence energizer is expensive, see if the cows owner will lend you one until the cow changes it's tastes. If the farmer has a dog, or a quad, then aggressively chasing the cow well away from your garden will help the cow remember.

I would guess you have some legal rights against a cow that breaks fences, even if it's on common ground.
 

Curious

Member
You're better off getting some help to stop the cow damage from continuing. A powerful fence energizer is expensive, see if the cows owner will lend you one until the cow changes it's tastes. If the farmer has a dog, or a quad, then aggressively chasing the cow well away from your garden will help the cow remember.

I would guess you have some legal rights against a cow that breaks fences, even if it's on common ground.
Thanks I like the idea of borrowing direct from the farmer - our daughters are friends so I want to stay on good terms and maybe this would be a good way of dealing with the situation and keeping the good relationship
 

BrianV

Member
Livestock Farmer
I’m hoping to get some advice please. I live on a property that adjoins common land and the local farmer grazes their cattle on it. I have no issues with this at all, I love where I live. Recently though there is one new cow that loves our garden - twice breaking the chain pit across the driveway to stop them getting in. We can’t put gates up as the driveway is on a slope and exits onto a roadway, and can’t install a cattle grid as water meters are in the way. This new cow has now broken another chain and done hundreds of pounds of damage to newly planted roses and peonies (when it happened there was also a van across the driveway). Do I have any grounds to request some recompense from the farmer? I don’t want to fall out as I appreciate the history of commoners grazing their cattle but it’s costing me a fortune in chains and plants and I can’t see how it can get any better. Sorry for the long post - thought it best to say it all in one instead of generating lots of questions! Thanks
Unfortunately it is the responsibility of every owner with property adjoining a common to ensure their property is livestock secure, this includes hedges & gate entrances. Your property needs to be both cattle & sheep secure.
 

Curious

Member
Unfortunately it is the responsibility of every owner with property adjoining a common to ensure their property is livestock secure, this includes hedges & gate entrances. Your property needs to be both cattle & sheep secure.
I know and that’s what I’m asking for help on, and I’m doing my best but this is a one cow demolition derby and I was hoping for some advice on what else I can try. I am appreciative of the posts offering this advice. If you can provide guidance on HOW I can keep my property secure (the whole point of my post) then that would be great
 
Location
Ceredigion
You're better off getting some help to stop the cow damage from continuing. A powerful fence energizer is expensive, see if the cows owner will lend you one until the cow changes it's tastes. If the farmer has a dog, or a quad, then aggressively chasing the cow well away from your garden will help the cow remember.

I would guess you have some legal rights against a cow that breaks fences, even if it's on common ground.
Who's responsible for fencing it though
 

Turnip

Member
If your kids are friends start with the informal chat, ask about the fence energised as mentioned before and see where it takes you.

Not sure about the fencing responsibility but @BrianV is most likely correct that it is your responsibility to make sure your property is livestock secure.
 

BrianV

Member
Livestock Farmer
I know and that’s what I’m asking for help on, and I’m doing my best but this is a one cow demolition derby and I was hoping for some advice on what else I can try. I am appreciative of the posts offering this advice. If you can provide guidance on HOW I can keep my property secure (the whole point of my post) then that would be great
If it was me I would ask the farmer if I could borrow an electric fencer & a short piece of fencing wire, one good shock from the fencer & the cow will disappear quickly! Once shocked it will not touch the chain again.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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