Community Larder

mf298

Member
We have a number of these in our area, taking in "waste" or out of date food from local supermarkets. Firstly, I can't get my head around the fact so much food is produced and then not consumed! I saw a figure of 15 million tonnes in 2015. Also wonder if the retailer claims some kind of brownie points for donating food while saving on disposal costs if it were to go to landfill.
Does anybody know any more about how this works, and why we have so much to dispose of.
Just to be absolutely clear I don't have any problem with food being distributed to the needy. Just can't get my head around why so much waste is factored into production and supply.
 

Muddyroads

Member
Location
Devon
We have the parish food bank based in our yard. They get quite a lot of donations from local supermarkets, especially Tesco’s. They tend to be sporadic but particularly high just after Christmas. Seemingly they deliberately over order to ensure they don’t run short of items and risk losing customers entire orders. As said, food is too cheap (or the margins are too high). This year they had loads of bananas and potatoes in particular. I’ve raised concerns before that they’re being used as an alternative free waste disposal service. I have no doubt it means the waste is not recorded as such.
 

delilah

Member
Lady who helps us does a pick up every Friday evening from pret a manger of the unsold stuff, she is allowed to do it on condition that she allows the elderly and poor in her area to come to her house between 6 - 8 pm to help themselves, so it's quite a commitment on her part. She saves some salmon sandwiches back for us to have the next morning, which is nice, but you do have to wonder at a society that values salmon so cheaply that they consistently make more than they will sell just so that they don't sell out.
 

mf298

Member
We have the parish food bank based in our yard. They get quite a lot of donations from local supermarkets, especially Tesco’s. They tend to be sporadic but particularly high just after Christmas. Seemingly they deliberately over order to ensure they don’t run short of items and risk losing customers entire orders. As said, food is too cheap (or the margins are too high). This year they had loads of bananas and potatoes in particular. I’ve raised concerns before that they’re being used as an alternative free waste disposal service. I have no doubt it means the waste is not recorded as such.

In our area there has been a lot of high value stuff over the festive season- 30 high value turkeys from one small M&S, hundreds of £ of fresh flowers from Aldi, I cpuld go on, just seems crazy!
 

TheTallGuy

Member
Location
Cambridgeshire
We have a number of these in our area, taking in "waste" or out of date food from local supermarkets. Firstly, I can't get my head around the fact so much food is produced and then not consumed! I saw a figure of 15 million tonnes in 2015. Also wonder if the retailer claims some kind of brownie points for donating food while saving on disposal costs if it were to go to landfill.
Does anybody know any more about how this works, and why we have so much to dispose of.
Just to be absolutely clear I don't have any problem with food being distributed to the needy. Just can't get my head around why so much waste is factored into production and supply.
Obviously the supermarkets play the brownie points game for donations to food banks etc., but there's no great financial savings as food waste normally gets recycled either as animal feed or goes for AD/composting rather than landfill. I seem to recall reading somewhere that Tesco were using biogas from food waste in some of their trucks.
 

Muddyroads

Member
Location
Devon
There might not be financial savings, but I don’t mind betting that if they were quizzed about their food waste figures they’d very quickly have remarkably low numbers because of their donations. Once the food has been donated it’s not their problem, regardless of its quality or quantity.
 

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Five nature-recovery projects spanning 100,000ha launched

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

Image-source-Savills-field-640x360.jpg
Five nature-recovery projects spanning nearly 100,000ha across the West Midlands, Cambridgeshire, the Peak District, Norfolk and Somerset have been announced by the government and Natural England today (Thursday, May 26).

This is the equivalent in size to all 219 current National Reserves.

The aim of the projects is to deliver nature recovery at a landscape scale, helping to tackle biodiversity loss, climate change and improve public health and well-being.

All five projects will make a significant contribution towards the national delivery of the international commitment to protect at least 30% of land and...
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