Compound, N Compound, Straights, other Polysulphate etc, or nothing foliar feed.

Renaultman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Darlington
As a lot of you know I have been trying to build fertility and OM and reduce 'bagged' compound use.
I have used nothing but Polysulpjhate and Calfos with OM for the last 4 years last year topped up with foliar K which I will happily do again.
Any way results are back again this year and similar if slightly lower than normal. With the usual issues Seriously high Mg and occasionally slightly low PH < I haven't limed for years but will possibly look at some Calcium lime in the Autumn.
Wheat yields last year were best ever and other yields were a good average.
Also will end up with a tank full of very expensive Liquid N that I may be tempted to carry over.
Thoughts please?
Best and worst. Bean stubble will get FYM Gypsum and Calfos before drilling, weather and time permitting
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Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
North Yorkshire
When did you sample last time? You'll get different results at different times of year, not to mention another offtake between spring & autumn. Building P indices takes time and a lot of product. I'd be happy using what you are already if it is good value vs straights like MOP and TSP. If it is not fully available then I wouldn't worry as you're mostly just topping up anyway. Feed the soil organic matter * reduce the steel input and it will make more available to the plants.

I've seen independent trials data that shows a response to fresh potash even with good indices, so keep that up.
 

Renaultman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Darlington
Same ish time as last year. In fresh potash do you mean a foliar feed or w bagged straight? P and K are reasonably cheap this year but I don't want to spend for spendings sake and I certainly don't want to do anything counter productive. Am keeping the tillage down where I can edging towards that no till scenario probably just as it goes out of fashion for everyone else.
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
North Yorkshire
I'm not experienced enough on foliar vs bagged K to comment, but I'd say you wouldn't get enough into the plant with foliar to make a big difference if it can't access enough from the soil. K requirements are massive when you look at these graphs even though most is returned to the soil by harvest.

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OSR nutrient needs vs growth stage.jpg
 

Clive

Staff Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lichfield
Looking through YEN data its seems to agree with fresh Potash regardless of indices, circa 80kgs about stem exention ?

It's the reason I have bought a solid fert spreader over the winter, explored liquid K option but silly price
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
North Yorkshire
Solid will need rainfall to wash it in but frankly if we haven't had rain from the start of stem extension to June we'll have other concerns... MOP is reasonably soluble I think, though not easy to formulate in liquid fertilisers at a meaningful rate unless using suspensions. Polysulphate is less soluble. Fertiliser spreading capacity during stem extension is quite stretched with N to apply too. Peak K demand is June/July so I guess May would be ok with rain afterwards.
 

Renaultman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Darlington
Looking through YEN data its seems to agree with fresh Potash regardless of indices, circa 80kgs about stem exention ?

It's the reason I have bought a solid fert spreader over the winter, explored liquid K option but silly price
80kg MOP/ha so just under 200kg/ha product? Will this get locked up in a high Mg soil @York thoughts please?
 

Renaultman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Darlington
I can't recall the data now, will look later but I think I had in mind 80-100kgs of product not K
That sounds a lot more palatable, thanks. Was thinking originally of 250kg 0 24 24 which would be similar as long as the P would go in to the bank got to price it v straights next.
 

Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

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Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

Written by Lisa Applin

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In July, we opened the applications window for farmers to join our Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot.

The Sustainable Farming Incentive is 1 of the 3 new environmental land management schemes. It sits alongside the future Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery schemes.

Through the Sustainable Farming Incentive, farmers will be paid for environmentally sustainable actions – ones that are simple to do and do not require previous agri-environment scheme experience.

We are piloting the scheme to...
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