Connecting to a water main

Lincs Lass

Member
Location
north lincs
You,ll be digging a trench ,,may aswell put a bigger pipe and be a bit overkill as putting a small bore pipe in and then end up with a slow flow and you have to dig it all out again ,,dig it once and for good

Maybe a costly out lay now but cheaper in the long run
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
We used to have 3 houses running off a 1 1/4 inch pipe running 500 metres uphill with no issues.
This is the equivalent to 35 mm
Our 600 sow pig unit ran off a 50 mm main so I think 63 mm pipe is overkill.
Do think 25 is a bit small though and would prefer 30+
 

pumps&filtration

New Member
To be honest chain trencher is what you need much faster and neater than a digger. We can trench,lay and backfill 250mtrs a day. As another person said borehole would be best option and far less hassle.
 

franklin

New Member
What would be a day rate then for a chain trencher then?

Havent received quote for borehole yet, despite asking for one back in January.

:(
 
Had quotes in wales for a bore hole of around £2500

Fitted 2no 32m pipes a few years back, Thames Water are evil. Cost about £1800 each and all they did was fit 2 m of pipe and supply meters.

My advice would be, if you discount a bore hole put a decent sized pipe as close as you can get. If necessary step it down for the connection.

The costs are trenching and connections not materials here
 

franklin

New Member
I'd go for the borehole, but ideally would like a mains supply as backup. Overkill perhaps, but wont know until I have all the prices in.
 

teslacoils

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
How did you get on with this in end? Curious here!
I sold it and bought a new farm. I'm currently putting in a new 62mm main. 1750m. It's going across farm land to the point of connection. New main connection was not overly dear - large users can now change supplier so they are being friendly. It's steady going but whole lot is going to be circa £22k pipe, digging, pressure testing, chlorinating etc.

Local borehole company didn't bother to ring back. For that it was a bit "hmm might be ok" but no certainty. And cost of pumps, electric and fitting was going to be circa £15k. I'm going to add rainwater harvesting and cleaning for the next step.
 

top char

Member
I sold it and bought a new farm. I'm currently putting in a new 62mm main. 1750m. It's going across farm land to the point of connection. New main connection was not overly dear - large users can now change supplier so they are being friendly. It's steady going but whole lot is going to be circa £22k pipe, digging, pressure testing, chlorinating etc.

Local borehole company didn't bother to ring back. For that it was a bit "hmm might be ok" but no certainty. And cost of pumps, electric and fitting was going to be circa £15k. I'm going to add rainwater harvesting and cleaning for the next step.
Sounds a lot of money, but i spent 10k drilling and didn't get a drop of water, so now going down same route as yourself. Roughly 800m through mixed land, application just sent in so just hope Scottish Water play ball.
 

teslacoils

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
62mm pipe roughly three times the cost of 32mm. Welded joints. Diggers. Several inspection chambers are quite dear. As are fittings, taps, double check valves. Connection itself wasn't overly dear, but we are bringing the pipe to about 2m from their existing hydrant.

Borehole could be cheaper, but say 300m of fancy three phase cable, conduit, digging up part of yard, collecting tank etc are all expensive extras.

My view was if I was digging the trench etc I may as well put in a fat pipe, and it's big enough for a fire hydrant if I want a nice green field set of stock housing.
 

Speedstar

Member
Location
Scottish Borders
In most cases now you can only put a 32mm pipe in , we wanted to put a 50mm pipe in for our new build but Scottish water said no 32mm in the biggest you can put in and this is 550meters going up hill with a total head of 24meters
 

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CHAP launches CropMonitor Pro â a new digital service for predicting crop pest and disease risks

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