Cost of a sheep caesarian.....

spin cycle

Member
Location
north norfolk
I got that impression but it was over 20 years ago I was struggling to remember the details. I think he said they did it three times then they were knackered.

Its like if you speak to the grazing lads they'll tell you everyone was milking 7ft high skinny holsteins in the late 90s early 2000s.

How widespread was it actually in both cases?
pretty widespread i think
 

Optimus

Member
I got that impression but it was over 20 years ago I was struggling to remember the details. I think he said they did it three times then they were knackered.

Its like if you speak to the grazing lads they'll tell you everyone was milking 7ft high skinny holsteins in the late 90s early 2000s.

How widespread was it actually in both cases?
Sure they would do a c section 3 times on a cow.twice on the normal side then once on the other.that's if they could get them back in calf.
 

Optimus

Member
Can remember my dad telling me first time they needed to do side door job.they had to get another vet cos their usual vet had never done one.seen plenty since though.
 

David.

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
J11 M40
This one didn't cost anything (apart from a new scalpel blade)......
View attachment 952328
....haven't had one shove her guts out the back for a couple of years but this 4 cropper did on Friday night:banghead:

You don't have to hang about after pulling the trigger and you never really know if the lambs are near enough to term to survive but nothing ventured and all that.
They were a few days short of being 'fully cooked'....
View attachment 952332

......... but they're doing fine and sucking like good 'uns now (y)
Interesting, I normally go in midline, in front the udder, with a bang-caesar; saves all the rummaging about.
All's well that ends well.
 

yellowbelly

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
N.Lincs
Interesting, I normally go in midline, in front the udder, with a bang-caesar; saves all the rummaging about.
All's well that ends well.
Good idea (y) - I'd never thought of that.
It's always a bit of a rush to get home for a gun and find a sharp knife before the shock kicks in and it's too late 'cos the fudger has died on you :facepalm:
 

yellowbelly

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
N.Lincs
I got that impression but it was over 20 years ago I was struggling to remember the details. I think he said they did it three times then they were knackered.

Its like if you speak to the grazing lads they'll tell you everyone was milking 7ft high skinny holsteins in the late 90s early 2000s.

How widespread was it actually in both cases?
I remember seeing a (Panorama??) documentary about the main national Belgium breeding centre years ago.
The place was run by vets and they walked (well more like waddled) these very extreme shaped cows into a purpose built operating theatre as a matter of course to cut their calves out :facepalm:
As you say, a couple of times on one side and then another from the other side.
 

JMcA

Member
Livestock Farmer
£130 including drugs, but we took her to the vet. £74 for the ewe, £67 for the two lambs. So I'd do it again.
 

Big Ambitions

Member
Livestock Farmer
I remember seeing a (Panorama??) documentary about the main national Belgium breeding centre years ago.
The place was run by vets and they walked (well more like waddled) these very extreme shaped cows into a purpose built operating theatre as a matter of course to cut their calves out :facepalm:
As you say, a couple of times on one side and then another from the other side.
I worked with a Belgian vet student a few lambings ago. It’s not only vets who can do c-secs over there. I’m not sure the ins and outs, but it’s definitely not a “vet only” procedure, as it is in the UK. The cattle in her area were BB, and almost every calving was a c-sec
 

Hilly

Member
Seems to me one half of livestock farmers want stock that can look after themselves and the other half want c section type stuff, not a lot in between these days , good luck to them breeding stock that know will be a c section should be a criminal offence imo bloody cruelty of done on purpose just to get an extreme animal .
 

Ryegrass controls stack up

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Learning from the successes of growers’ black-grass control programmes gives a raft of integrated cultural and herbicide strategies that can also be used to hit back at increasing ryegrass populations, advises Syngenta Technical Manager, Georgina Wood.

“Key to that success is stacking up as many of those options as is practically possible in a farm situation.”

  • Delay drilling
  • Adapt cultivations
  • Increase spring cropping
  • Grow competitive crops
  • Prioritise pre-emergence applications
  • Stack pre-em herbicides
  • Optimise treatment timing and...
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