Countryside Seeds Ltd

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Legume and Herb Rich Mixture (GS4) (Herbal Ley) from DLF.

This mixture will provide habitat and food for invertebrates including crop pollinators, benefit soil structure, mitigate climate change by reducing nitrogen fertiliser use and provide productive high-quality forage for livestock.

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DLF's Herbal Meadow (GS4).

This mix will produce vigorous sward with abundant legumes and herbs, suitable for productive cattle and sheep, will also provide habitat and food for invertebrates, including crop pollinators, and improve soil structure and water infiltration.

HERBAL MEADOW (GS4).jpg
 

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Save time and money with new improved ProNitro® seed coating
Save both time and money with the ProNitro® seed coating with hydroactive water management technology. The coating contains nitrogen and wetting agent. With this combination, you will ensure much more efficient use of water, and you will get much stronger and faster establishment because the wetting agent will lower the water surface tension

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Sowing a forage crop and taking a ‘cereal break’ is a win-win!

Samson Stubble Turnip

Give the arable crop rotation a break and sow a forage crop this autumn, to help achieve better weed control and boost home grown feed supplies. Mixed cereal and livestock units are encouraged to think about growing forages on some of their arable land, as this will help weed control by breaking the life cycles of some damaging weeds and diseases.

Forage crops – and any grazing livestock – add organic matter to the soils, which is especially valuable in nutrient depleted soils. Soil structure and condition warrants attention on many arable units, and rotations that include forage crops are more sustainable in the long run.

Forage crops, such as; fast-growing brassica and root crops, and short-term grass leys, can be sown post-harvest to give a much-needed break in the cereal rotation, as well as providing a valuable feed crop.


Unicorn Rape Kale Hybrid

Roots and brassicas can be grazed-off ahead of a spring drilled cereal crop, or ahead of a grass reseed. Leaving a grass ley down for two to three years will also help break the blackgrass cycle.

There are plenty of high feed value varieties to choose, that can improve livestock growth rates and performance.

Our recommendations are:

Samson stubble turnip – for grazing October onwards
Unicorn rape-kale hybrid – high protein leafy forage
Meatmaker brassica mixture – contains stubble turnips and forage rape for later use.
 

Great In Grass

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Climatic situations reveal breeding opportunities
Our Alfalfa breeding is busy and they are constantly on their feet to find and register qualities in Alfalfa as to any climatic challenge.



DLF Alfalfa is usually cultivated in a rotation of up to 5 years and it is for any farmer important to harvest the highest quality and yield every year in spite of changeable weather and extreme climatic conditions.

Our breeders are always looking for incredible peculiarities, as any small change in the nursery crops might be an improvement compared to old varieties. However, we will also have a look at more common breeding target as:

  • High dry matter yield
  • High lodging resistance
  • High protein content
  • Improved digestibility
  • Nematode resistance
  • Verticillium resistance
  • Anthracnose resistance
One important breeding tool in DLF Alfalfa
Alfalfa is an allogamous plant which mean cross-pollinated and for this reason, we need insects to pollinate plants in our nurseries and seed production. Affected by the changeable climate is the amount of insects, but we have not so far had severe challenged with pollination.
Did you know…
  • There are different Alfalfas fitting different climatic conditions. The main types are the Flemish Alfalfa types (dormancy < 5) and Mediterranean Alfalfa types (dormancy > 5), but then you also have Alfalfa varieties adapted for grazing. With a low dormancy, you get very winter hardy Alfalfas and with increasing dormancy you get alfalfas not suitable for cold winter.
  • Alfalfa feed insects and works as a hidding place for chicks and smaller animals. Try letting a corner of the field untouched and observe a bird, insects and wildlife blossom.

Learn more about DLF Alfalfa here
 

Great In Grass

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Feed grows where the water flows
Do you also consider what to do as periods of drought becomes more common?

It is difficult to cope with situations of drying wells and constant deficit of rainfall, but it is possible to take certain precautions, namely when dealing with agriculture production.

We have collected five improvements or ideas for you to consider in production of forage for your cows if drought becomes more common.

1. Focus on grass species that yield most in first or second cut before any drought occurs, or even species yielding regardless of drought. You could for instance use:
a. Hybrid ryegrass – known for its ability to take advantages of spring soil moisture and yield early in season, giving you an impressive yield of high quality.
b. Cocksfoot, tall fescue or timothy – known for their early yield but also their persistency to withstand severe drought.
c. Festulolium Tall fescue PLUS or Ryegrass PLUS, which will withstand drought or reestablish very fast at first touch of water. These grasses do not only withstand drought but also deliver an impressive yield of high quality.
d. DLF Alfalfa – a specie cultivated in most parts of the world and known for its content of protein. This specie has a long taproot and will prevail periods of drought with a constant yield, hence you will be able to maintain you field management and cut 4 to 5 times a year.

2. Choose a suitable mixture for your farmland and skip using straights varieties or species. You will become less vulnerable using mixtures as a mixture consist of many different species with different tolerances to drought.

3. Consider establish your field in late summer or early autumn when risk of drought tend to be minor. Sowing late in season will help grasses to establish a comprehensive root system before coming spring and summer drought. Spring and summer drought tend to damp off small-unprotected seedlings in newly established fields.

4. Manage you sward more carefully with forecast of drought
a. Quality of grasses evolves over time and peaks when heading - cut just before heading to obtain highest quality.
b. Adjust and increase cutting height by app. 1-3cm. The ration between roots and shoots is somewhat constant. Cutting off leaves will have an impact on roots and reduce the root mass until root:shoot ration is again at a constant equilibrium. Reduced root mass in periods of drought will delay regrowth as important deep roots are destroyed.

5. Choose varieties from DLF will also provide certainty of high preforming varieties – even in drought. Our breeders test new grasses in different climates and recently we have join forces with other breeding companies in RadiMax. In this complex facility plant material is screened for root mass which is then related to DNA profiles.

GRACE-FO
Once again, Europe experiences a difficult situation with tendency to drought and the situation is worsen as the winter 2019-2020 was the warmest on record with very little snow and rain.
Root zone soil moisture measured by GRACE-FO indicated already severe conditions in central Europa and upcoming situations in several other places. Darkest red spots represent dry conditions, which should only occur 2 percent of the time – once every 50 years.

The dry and hot winter, a dry spring with a heat wave in May and a forecast for summer 2020 of even more drought does make it difficult to cultivate any farmland.
 

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DLF Alfalfa - when sustainable farming generates higher value
DLF is part of the global vision of a sustainable future as summarized in the UN Global Goals. It is a focal point in our green agenda to provide farmers worldwide with sustainable agricultural solutions. DLF Alfalfa is one of many sustainable products that increase agricultural productivity and goes hand in hand with a climate-neutral future.



A focus area in DLF is to contribute to sustainable forage solutions to the benefit of farmers and our climate. DLF Alfalfa is a locally produced protein source with high nutritional value and a high output, generated on low input.

Import of protein affects the climate
The global demand for reduced greenhouse gas emissions is a high priority. In dairy and meat production, locally produced forage solutions, with high productivity, will balance the greenhouse gas emissions in a more sustainable direction.
Locally produced protein for forage is recognized as having a positive effect on the climate. By reducing long-distance transport of protein sources, carbon emissions will be considerably reduced.

The root of solutions
Proteins have an important role in forage production because they generate a high productivity in dairy and meat production. Alfalfa and grass forage mixtures have proven to deliver up to four times higher yield in drought conditions compared to grass production fields.

With DLF Alfalfa farmers will be able to:
• Promote locally produced protein
With DLF Alfalfa in locally produced forage solutions the amount of protein will be maximized per hectare and farmers will be less dependent on imported protein.
• Experience high stability over years
Due to its extensive rooting ability, DLF Alfalfa will find moisture from deep in the soil, allowing it to continue growing also in very dry conditions.
• Reduce input cost
DLF Alfalfa has symbiotic nitrogen fixation and requires a minimum input of pesticides.

Less transport and carbon emission
By enabling farmers to grow local forage protein, DLF Alfalfa contribute to reduce carbon emission. This improves forage digestibility and boost milk and meat production. As a result, farmers save money, improve output and support long-term sustainable farming.

The UN Global Goals
DLF solutions are optimized to maximize output and minimize the input of other resources by being resilient to changed climate conditions. Optimized solutions from DLF, reduce the global climatic and environmental impact. DLF Alfalfa makes a unique contribution to:

- Achieve food security by increasing productivity (goal 2)
- Takes urgent action to combat climate change by sequestrating carbon (goal 13)


FACT BOX
• DLF Alfalfa contains up to 20% protein compared with 14% for grasses and 9% for maize.
• DLF Alfalfa Introduces the equivalent of 250 kg N fertilizer
• DLF Alfalfa and grass mixtures generates up to 5% higher crude protein content in home-produced forage compared to grass
• DLF Alfalfa is deep rooting and improves soil fertility and -health
• DLF Alfalfa is extremely resilient to drought
 

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DLF PLUS-grasses - When sustainable products increase agricultural productivity
DLF is part of the global vision of a sustainable future as summarized in the UN Global Goals. It is a focal point in our green agenda to provide farmers worldwide with sustainable agricultural solutions. PLUS-grasses are one of many new sustainable products developed by DLF, that increase agricultural productivity and goes hand in hand with a climate-neutral future.

DLF contribute to the green transition with research, that develops future forage solutions. PLUS-grasses are one of our solutions for farmers. These type of grasses are also well known under the Festulolium name. PLUS-grasses are advantageous, combining the traits of their parental components for improved performance. We offer two types of PLUS-grasses: Tall fescue PLUS and Ryegrass PLUS.

Tall fescue PLUS varieties have an optimal growth for a longer period under dry conditions due to an extensive and deep rooting system. Ryegrass PLUS varieties have higher persistency and better stress tolerance that minimize the risk of crop loss.



Food supply and security in a challenging environment
Extreme weather conditions appear more and more regularly around the world. Dry periods during the growing season are not unusual. In some countries, droughts become more severe and longer lasting, which will aggravate the growth conditions for the crop. Under such conditions, farmers harvest will be at a higher risk creating food insecurity for both humans and animals.

Therefore, farmers require crops that can maintain growth for a longer period under dry conditions. PLUS-grasses meet these criteria, and at the same time farmers can produce higher yield per hectare with a lower CO2 impact.




Climate adapted PLUS-grasses provide more forage
For more than 35 years, DLF’s plant breeders have innovated green solutions by crossing different types of grasses.

With PLUS-grasses farmers will be able to:
  1. Achieve stability over the season
    PLUS-grasses have resilience to many external factors such as plant diseases and climate challenges like drought.
  2. Obtain a higher production per ha
    High dry matter yield provides up to 25% more forage per year and extend persistency by two years.
  3. Experience a climate tolerant grass
    PLUS-grasses are adapted to climate challenges and their deep rooting system enables them to better withstand dry periods.
Climate change is largely due to CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. An extra advantage of perennial crops with a deep rooting system is the potential to sequester carbon in the soil.
Concerning UN Sustainable Development Goals
DLF solutions are optimized to maximize output and minimize the input of other resources by being resilient to changed climate conditions. Optimised solutions from DLF reduces the global climate and environmental impact. DLF PLUS-grasses makes a unique contribution to
  • Achieve food security by increasing productivity (goal 2)
  • Take urgent action to combat climate change by carbon sequestration (goal 13)
Facts about PLUS-grasses
PLUS-grasses are a result of a complex Festulolium breeding programme that combines the best characteristics of each parent specie; Lolium and Festuca. PLUS-grasses are marketed by DLF within two main groups: Ryegrass PLUS and Tall fescue PLUS.

Festulolium is a forage grass developed by crossing Meadow Fescue (Festuca pratense) or Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea) with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) or Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum).

Festulolium combines robustness with a high persistence and stress tolerance including a fast growth and high productivity.
 

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DLF Fiber Energy - when sustainable farming generates a higher profit
DLF is part of the global vision of a sustainable future as summarized in the UN Global Goals. It is a focal point in our strategic vision to provide farmers worldwide with sustainable agricultural solutions. DLF FIBER ENERGY is one of many sustainable products that increase agricultural productivity and goes hand in hand with a climate neutral future.

DLF contributes to the green transition with research, that develops future forage solutions. DLF Fiber Energy forage is determined by lab analysis, and only grasses with the highest fiber digestibility are honored with a DLF Fiber Energy badge.

Conditions for agricultural production
The global demand for meat and milk is high, and as the world’s population increases exponentially, the demand of tomorrow will be even higher. Agriculture is highly exposed to climate change, as farming activities depend on climatic conditions. Meanwhile, the climate and environmental impact from milk and meat production is alarming as methane emissions from cows contribute to global warming.

In the future, the world needs solutions that increase agricultural productivity and reduces the emissions of methane pr. unit produced. We are ambitious at DLF and we feel that DLF Fiber Enegy is part of this solution. We continously develop green and sustainable solutions that reduce the agricultural impact on the climate.

Fewer cow burps – and more milk and meat



DLF Fiber Energy is a quality standard used for forage varieties with an increased digestibility. Each cow eats the same amount of grass but with a higher digestibility, the feed uptake increases, and provides more energy to the cow. DLF Fiber Energy improves the digestibility of up to 8 percent, producing more milk and meat with the same feed intake and maintaining the same methane emission.

With DLF Fiber Energy farmers will be able to:

  1. Use more locally produced forage. With DLF Fiber Energy in locally produced forage solutions more energy is released to the cow
  2. Experience a higher productivity. With more energy, each cow produces more milk and gains more weight, meaning more meat.
  3. Less methane into the atmosphere. With an improved digestibility of ensiled grass, the cow rumen is more efficient with less enteric fermentation.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals

DLF Fiber Energy makes a unique contribution to

  • Achieve food security by increasing productivity (goal 2)
  • Takes urgent action to combat climate change by sequestrating methane (goal 13)


FACT BOX
With the improved the digestibility up to 8 percent which gives:

  • More milk per cow: 730 l per year
  • More kilos per cow: 70 kg per year
 

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DLF Grass and Clover - Sustainable farming practice
It is a global challenge to secure a green and sustainable future for our climate and environment. DLF takes part in the global vision for a sustainable future. Products produced by DLF contribute to a sustainable future as it has been summarized in the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Core to our business is to breed reliable and sustainable solutions for farmers world-wide.

To offset the climatic and environmental impact of milk and meat production farmers globally need to continually develop their farming practice towards reducing the carbon footprint and improving the environmental profile. It is possible to reduce the climate impact by basing the feed supply on a local production of perennial, high quality grass and legume as the feed source. Choosing perennial forage mixtures will improve yield and livestock productivity while at the same time sequestering carbon and reducing the methane emission pr. unit milk or meat hence reducing the carbon emission.


The soil – the foundation for sustainable farming

The soil and crop are livestock managers foundation for a sustainable farming practice, and they impact each other positively. Grassland established with a mixture of perennial fiber energy grasses and legumes (clovers or alfalfa) positively impacts the soil, environment and climate. There are multiple reasons to pay an interest to the soil features of perennial grasslands as they positively impact the soil structure, nutrient retention and carbon sequestration compared to annual crops.

Perennial grassland adds to soil fertility
The long growth season of grasses and legumes from early spring to late autumn builds up biomass in the soil. The extensive grass root biomass absorbs nitrate and other nutrients efficiently and creates micropores that are key to transport nutrients and water to avoid flooding. The root mass increases the soil biomass and sequesters carbon. To learn more about root architecture DLF has partnered up to build the state-of-the-art root screening facility “RadiMax” in cooperation with universities and plant breeders. The screening results help bring new varieties with proven root structure to the market.

Increase productivity, reduce the climate impact of milk and meat production
Methane, which is also emitted from cows, is a severe greenhouse gas, contributing to the global climate change. Local production of forage solutions which can increase productivity of livestock and the efficiency of land used for forage production should be a priority for farmers. Using grasses and legumes with a high feeding value increases milk production pr. cow. With fewer cows, the same amount of milk or meat can be produced while reducing the methane emission.

Optimized forage solutions to benefit climate and environment
Perennial forage crops have a top-notch climate and environmental profile, and if we are able to promote greater use of these crops, we are well on our way to helping agriculture in the green transition.
DLF's plant breeding is targeted to develop the next generation of robust and high productivity grass, clover and alfalfa varieties.

With DLF Grass and Clover mixtures farmers will be able to:

  • Improve yield and sequester carbon. Leaving the soil undisturbed builds up organic matter and improves biological activity and soil fertility
  • Rely on homegrown forage. By optimizing grassland productivity farmers become less reliant on import of feed
  • Improve milk and meat production. DLF Grass and Clover forage provides high yields, digestibility and protein content


Concerning UN Sustainable Development Goals

DLF solutions are optimized to maximize output and minimize the input of other resources by being resilient to changed climate conditions. Optimized solutions from DLF reduce the global climate and environmental impact. DLF Grass and Clover makes a unique contribution to

  • Goal 2: 2.4: By 2030, ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters and that progressively improve land and soil quality.
  • Goal 13: Climate change. Takes urgent action to combat climate change and its impact.


Read more about sutainable agriculture here.
 

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Bio-refined Protein 
When sustainable farming generates higher profit


DLF is part of the global vision for a sustainable future as summarized in the UN Sustainable Development Goals. It is a focal point in our green agenda to provide farmers worldwide with sustainable agricultural solutions. Traditionally beef production has been grass-fed, but with an innovative refining process meat production from pigs and poultry can also benefit from the green advantages of feeding the animals with clover, grass and alfalfa. Bio-refined protein is one of many sustainable products that increase agricultural productivity and goes hand in hand with a climate-neutral future.

DLF aspires to work with many different partners to reduce climate impact for the agricultural sector. Bio-refined protein from grass and alfalfa is a brand-new business area in the refined protein segment. Selected partners are involved in the business development of grass-protein and DLF is proud to be one of them.

Increasing population requires sustainable meat production
Demand is increasing for a locally produced sustainable alternative to imported soy. A locally grown protein for feed will meet the future needs for sustainable meat production. The global demand for meat is high and will increase along with the human population.

Innovative forage solutions will fulfill the demand for locally grown protein. Bio-refined protein will be part of this solution.

Climate-friendly protein production
Perennial production has a positive impact on the environment and climate impact from agricultural production. Grass and alfalfa have an interesting profile for a refine protein, as the production of leaf biomass is high. The protein stored in leaves are by nature directly available to ruminants. A new innovative refining process concentrates protein from grass and alfalfa to be a valuable protein source to feed pigs and poultry.

A breakthrough for climate-changing protein production going from imported soy to locally grown protein in grass, clover and alfalfa.

In May 2020, three agricultural companies in Denmark have agreed to establish BioRefine Denmark A/S, a green biorefinery designed to produce protein for organic feed based on grass, clover and alfalfa from approx. 2.000 hectares.

With Bio-refined proteins local farmers will be able to:

  • Use more locally grown protein. Refining of protein from grass and alfalfa will lower the need for the import of soy
  • Lower input cost. Using nitrogen-fixing clover and alfalfa minimizes the costs for fertilizer
  • Lower impact on climate. More perennial forage crops with a top-notch climate and environmental profile and less long-distance transport for import reduces emission into the atmosphere
Locally grown – fewer emissions. A conversion from imported soy to locally grown grass or alfalfa will reduce the effect on the climate and decrease emissions from agriculture and transport.

Concerning UN Sustainable Development Goals
DLF solutions are optimized to maximize output and minimize the input of other resources by being resilient to changed climate conditions. Optimized solutions from DLF reduce the global climate and environmental impact. DLF Bio-refined Protein makes a unique contribution to:

  • Achieve food security by increasing productivity (goal 2)
  • Takes urgent action to combat climate change by sequestrating methane (goal 13)
  • The goal of Life on land – Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems (goal 15)
Fact box
Studies at Aarhus University show up to 50 percent of the protein extractable from forage is digestible for pigs and poultry with optimal amino acid composition.
 

Great In Grass

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Danish cooperatives join forces on green protein
The three agricultural companies DLG, Danish Agro and DLF are now joining forces to establish a protein biorefinery for local production of grass protein with a strong environmental and climate-friendly profile. The goal is that grass protein in the long term can replace part of the soy that agriculture uses in animal feed today.

Danish agriculture is intensively working to develop locally produced protein sources, and now three key players - the agricultural companies DLG, Danish Agro and DLF - are joining forces. Together, they will establish a protein plant to produce concentrated protein from clover grass and alfalfa for organic feed, and eventually also protein that can be included in human food.

The project is supported by the Danish business development scheme Green Development and Demonstration Program (GUDP), which in the autumn made a grant of up to DKK 14 million. kr.

“DLF's plant breeding is targeted to optimize the yields of grassland and exploit the potential for green protein from clover grass and alfalfa. Perennial forage crops have a top-notch climate and environmental profile, and if we are able to promote greater use of these crops, we are well on our way to helping agriculture in the green transition, "says Truels Damsgaard, CEO in DLF.

Kristian Hundebøll, CEO of DLG, says:
“Sustainability is high on the agenda at DLG, which is why it is very positive that we, across companies, can join forces on this project, where we aim to create sustainable solutions for the benefit of our customers and owners in agriculture. Danish farmers are considered among the world's most sustainable, and agricultural companies must contribute with innovative solutions that enable them to stay in front. "

Henning Haahr, CEO of Danish Agro, complements:
“The project is very much in support of the development of protein production in Denmark, and the goal is that we can replace some of the imported proteins with locally produced protein crops, so that we can contribute to reaching the goal of a climate neutral food industry in 2050. I am pleased that Danish Agro are helping to move agriculture in an even more sustainable direction. "

Once the project is established, it will include the cultivation of clover grass and alfalfa of approx. 2,000 hectares, a central processing unit capable of producing concentrated protein, silage, grass juice and a residual product that can be used for biogas production. The goal is a total production of approx. 4,000 tons of protein and 25,000 tons of dry matter.
Initially, the goal is to refine protein based on organic crops that can further help to develop organic production based on locally produced protein.

The three agricultural companies will establish the company BioRefine Denmark A / S, which will run the green bio refinery, where protein from clover grass and alfalfa will be extracted

Facts:
DLG, Danish Agro and DLF establish the company BioRefine Denmark A/S, which establishes a biorefinery plant for the production of concentrated protein from clover grass and alfalfa for organic feed and in the long term also white protein for human food.

DLG owns 50 percent of BioRefine Denmark A / S, while Danish Agro and DLF each account for 25 percent of the shares.
 

Great In Grass

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Location
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Options for minimising forage shortfalls

Livestock farmers concerned about forage shortfalls in the wake of an exceptionally dry May could include summer-drilled brassica fodder crops as part of a wider strategy, thereby taking the pressure off silage clamps this coming autumn and winter.

The advice comes from Germinal GB’s Helen Mathieu, who acknowledged the impact that recent drought conditions could have on forage resources during her presentation at a recent GrassCheck GB webinar.

“Soil moisture level recordings being taken across the country as part of the GrassCheck GB programme confirm the full extent of the hot and dry conditions we’ve been experiencing and there will inevitably be a long-term effect, whatever the weather going forward,” she said.

“I recommend that farmers review their current position as soon as possible, on a field-by-field basis, and identify the worst performing fields for prompt action. In the case of fields that were already nearing the end of their productive life, the very dry conditions may well be the final straw. In such cases, the best way forward may well be to burn off the old sward and establish a fast-growing fodder crop, such as Redstart hybrid brassica, to provide valuable grazing at any point from the late summer through into the winter.

“Using a hybrid brassica has the advantage of rapid establishment and will also provide as much as 10 tonnes/ha of quality forage. As a rape/kale cross, it is also winter hardy and therefore suitable for out-wintering, so it offers great versatility. It’s also a very good break crop within a grassland reseeding programme, creating a clean start for a new ley next year.”

Interacting with an industry-wide audience at the AHDB-run webinar, Helen addressed questions on an array of current challenges. In relation to recent grassland reseeds, where the drought may have exacerbated problems caused during a difficult establishment phase last autumn, she said that overseeding may be the best short-term solution.

“Where swards are quite open, but most of the plants are perennial ryegrass, the best approach may well be to stitch in more perennial ryegrass, at around 10kg/acre, once there is sufficient soil moisture. This will boost performance later in the season and help to minimise the impact of the drought.”

Fields should also be earmarked for conventional reseeding later in the summer, where possible, to maintain productivity into 2021.

“If at all possible, try to maintain your routine reseeding plans, as this is the best way to avoid a long-term knock-on effect from the recent dry spell,” she added. “We know that reseeding results in a significant uplift in the quantity and quality of forage available and that this will more than pay for the investment within the first year.”

Germinal GB’s Helen Mathieu was the invited specialist speaker at the GrassCheck GB webinar on grassland reseeding, run by AHDB. Further details, including webinar recordings, are available at www.grasscheckgb.co.uk.
 

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1595157583367.png


Sowing a forage crop and taking a ‘cereal break’ is a win-win!


Samson Stubble Turnip

Give the arable crop rotation a break and sow a forage crop this autumn, to help achieve better weed control and boost home grown feed supplies. Mixed cereal and livestock units are encouraged to think about growing forages on some of their arable land, as this will help weed control by breaking the life cycles of some damaging weeds and diseases.


Forage crops – and any grazing livestock – add organic matter to the soils, which is especially valuable in nutrient depleted soils. Soil structure and condition warrants attention on many arable units, and rotations that include forage crops are more sustainable in the long run.


Forage crops, such as; fast-growing brassica and root crops, and short-term grass leys, can be sown post-harvest to give a much-needed break in the cereal rotation, as well as providing a valuable feed crop.



Unicorn Rape Kale Hybrid

Roots and brassicas can be grazed-off ahead of a spring drilled cereal crop, or ahead of a grass reseed. Leaving a grass ley down for two to three years will also help break the blackgrass cycle.


There are plenty of high feed value varieties to choose, that can improve livestock growth rates and performance.


Our recommendations are:


Samson stubble turnip – for grazing October onwards
Unicorn rape-kale hybrid – high protein leafy forage
Meatmaker brassica mixture – contains stubble turnips and forage rape for later use.
 

Great In Grass

Member
Location
Cornwall.
Catch crop mixtures are becoming increasingly popular as a way of providing a balanced feed, that can be grazed in-situ. Most of these concepts involve the blending of catch crop species, such as stubble turnips, forage rape and kale. The high protein contents of both forage rape and kale complement the high energy stubble turnip bulbs and provide an excellent, well-balanced autumn or winter feed.

Catch Crops.jpg
 

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1595157936177.png



Unicorn Rape Kale Hybrid Brassica
Producing a quality feed in a short period of time
Unicorn is a new rape kale brassica hybrid, bred to produce a quality feed in a short period of time.
It will produce a nutritious feed for dairy, beef or lamb production and can be utilised in summer, autumn or winter.
Unicorn provides a high protein feed, with grazing flexibility.
This variety exhibits fast growth and early vigour. Crops can be sown from May through to mid-August with most crops ready to graze within 12-14 weeks from sowing.
Unicorn has some regrowth potential, if the crops are lightly grazed leaving a 8-10 inch stem some regrowth can be expected.

Strengths

  • Rape kale hybrid with grazing flexibility
  • High DM yields
  • Fast feed potential
  • 'Bounceback' regrowth potential
  • Excellent palatability with large high protein leaves that are easily eaten

Unicorn-Tech-Sheet-2019.jpg

 

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1595158270209.png


Samson can produce huge, tankard-shaped purple bulbs which are very palatable to both sheep and cattle.


In trials, Samson has shown to be preferentially grazed which can lead to higher intake and liveweight gains.

Stubble-Turnip-Technical-Summary-2020.jpg
 

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