Crimped wheat for dairy cows

rusty

Member
Has anyone got any tips for crimping wheat for dairy cows. I am thinking of crimping 28 acres of winter wheat instead of making it into whole crop silage. I have another 53 acres to go in the pit and a bigger than usual heap of first cut.
I have storage in a purpose built indoor pit on a farm that I rent . The crop is at 1100ft up so will take time to ripen. I have tried combining a bit in the past and propcorning it in the mixer wagon but wasn’t very happy with the results as it tended to heat up.
What are the costs of Crimping and additives?
I had come to the conclusion that it was easier to buy wheat in to roll but that was before it got to £300/tonne.
 
Location
Sw Scotland
Has anyone got any tips for crimping wheat for dairy cows. I am thinking of crimping 28 acres of winter wheat instead of making it into whole crop silage. I have another 53 acres to go in the pit and a bigger than usual heap of first cut.
I have storage in a purpose built indoor pit on a farm that I rent . The crop is at 1100ft up so will take time to ripen. I have tried combining a bit in the past and propcorning it in the mixer wagon but wasn’t very happy with the results as it tended to heat up.
What are the costs of Crimping and additives?
I had come to the conclusion that it was easier to buy wheat in to roll but that was before it got to £300/tonne.
We crimp all the grain we keep for dairy cows, just use maize additive on it cheap as
 

O'Reilly

Member
I've seen feed urea at £1150/t an £1450/t in the last month. We costed some rations for next winter with urea at £1450 and it was more expensive than using a 38%cake (to balance a high maize diet).

HOWEVER, a friend of mine feeds beef cattle on fertiliser urea and has been for a few years, up to 150g/day with no ill effects, that he's noticed. The only difference is that feed urea has an anti caking agent added apparently.
 
I've seen feed urea at £1150/t an £1450/t in the last month. We costed some rations for next winter with urea at £1450 and it was more expensive than using a 38%cake (to balance a high maize diet).

HOWEVER, a friend of mine feeds beef cattle on fertiliser urea and has been for a few years, up to 150g/day with no ill effects, that he's noticed. The only difference is that feed urea has an anti caking agent added apparently.

I'd sooner feed the 38% concentrate I think.

Main beauty of crimping/treating grain is no dust and no need for dry storage (which may heat or attract weevils and the like). Whether you crimp and ensile or treat with home and dry, urea or whatever they all have similar attractions. Some do not require the use of a crimper which could be a bonus, just mix it in, sheet it and wait.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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