Crow invasion

Jameshenry

Member
Location
Cornwall
Big aint best.
Diversify.
Enjoy life, it is short.
Get really, really angry at someone on the FF who is posing Q's that hurt! I'm the old barsteward and follow the younger lot in this.
Watch out for the next genertrstuion coz if you don't you really will be in trouble.
Grow quality wool, It still has a purpose. Even sadly it is only great compost. I only wear wool so listen to that.
Enjoy life. Simples & F' the anger.
SS
I'm not angry, just dissapointed you can't give me any practical advice on the question i asked !
 

Cowmansam

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Shropshire
Oh yes it will but they are such an interesting and amusing creature to be in company of....
SS
So is a tame fox badger ferret stoat polecat weasel all of which I’ve seen spent time with lovely animals but in the same stroke problem animals need removing I’ve no respect for killing for killing sake as it just creates vacuum for others to move in but when you get one who starts to cause mither it needs to go to hopefully be replaced by one who doesn’t
 
Location
Suffolk
So is a tame fox badger ferret stoat polecat weasel all of which I’ve seen spent time with lovely animals but in the same stroke problem animals need removing I’ve no respect for killing for killing sake as it just creates vacuum for others to move in but when you get one who starts to cause mither it needs to go to hopefully be replaced by one who doesn’t
The tame part is difficult, and yes I have had a tame fox, squirrrel, glis and as recently posted about a brief visit from a hand reared raven. Tame is so very different from wild and I'd have a job to write about it now and make my point, I have got to that stage in life where I see no difference in killing. I think the thing that has upset some is that I have called their methods out in that killing, to me, seems to be completely unnecessary in this day and age. I really can not see the difference in where sheep are within the UK and folk have said strongly that I have no idea of how 'their sheep' are. True, I can't see all sheep, only the shepherding has changed the and numbers as with everything.
Yes there is vacuum as the old saying nature abhors a vacuum.......But simply to shoot a corvid coz you can and feel you must is something that needs attention in the big scheme of things and this is what seems to have offended so many on the page. This is the attitude that I am strongly against as I was once that kill, kill, kill person so can understand the kill trigger but I'm trying to subdue it as I believe it does more harm than good.
SS
 
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Location
Suffolk
I'm not angry, just dissapointed you can't give me any practical advice on the question i asked !
@Jameshenry I posted what I believe is the way forward in unwanted wool. We use wool and bracken mixed and this is fantastic compost! Simples. 'Tis from oop Norf somewhere and so much better than anything else. We sell in a ten mile radius so we're not big but we do have very, very high ethical standards.
My brother indirectly grows quality merino wool for suits and top end cloth. Not a lot but it sells and I believe the UK still has a market for a huge variety of wool based material but I'm not in that market. That is up to you. I supplied Thames Sailing Barges with qualiity Oak timber for framing and other shipwright parts so understand unusual marketing. Wool is not that dissimilar in that the markets have turned their back on what I believe is a fabulous resource but once people realise the virtue of a non oil based resource then shepherding will have a higher value.
SS
 
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Jameshenry

Member
Location
Cornwall
@Jameshenry I posted what I believe is the way forward in unwanted wool. We use wool and bracken mixed and this is fantastic compost! Simples. 'Tis from oop Norf somewhere and so much better than anything else. We sell in a ten mile radius so we're not big but we do have very, very high ethical standards.
My brother indirectly grows quality merino wool for suits and top end cloth. Not a lot but it sells and I believe the UK still has a market for a huge variety of woll based material but I'm not in that market. That is up to you. I supplied Thames Sailing Barges with qualiity Oak timber for framing and other shipwright parts so understand unusual marketing. Wool is not that dissimilar in that the markets have turned their back on what I believe is a fabulous resource but once people realist the virtue of a non oil based resource then shepherding will have a higher value.
SS
You might well of posted what you believe is the way forward, but you won't or can't for some reason answer my direct question on how to avoid corvid predation on outside lambing flocks !
 
Location
Suffolk
To y'all
You might well of posted what you believe is the way forward, but you won't or can't for some reason answer my direct question on how to avoid corvid predation on outside lambing flocks !
Human intervention. Be there if you value your 'crop'. The football rattle. I wonder where this came from..............Surely no one invented this for football.
Get out of the 2022 4x4 and look after your flock. If it was woth £1,000,000 you'd be there in a deck-chair and a football rattle. :cool: Your land is worth that much so what is wrong with the produce?
SS
 

Jameshenry

Member
Location
Cornwall
To y'all

Human intervention. Be there if you value your 'crop'. The football rattle. I wonder where this came from..............Surely no one invented this for football.
Get out of the 2022 4x4 and look after your flock. If it was woth £1,000,000 you'd be there in a deck-chair and a football rattle. :cool: Your land is worth that much so what is wrong with the produce?
SS
So...football rattle and a deck chair 🤔...i'll let you know how i get on !
 

wrenbird

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
HR2
Have you ever lambed ewes outside? My sheep are not on the hill, not even upland. The last lambing I did outside was so much more stressful than it could of been, simply because of the numbers of rooks, carrion crows, buzzards, kites and a pair of ravens that had decided to take up residence in my little fields for the duration of lambing.
The final straw was when I was lambing a ewe with a breech presentation at the top of a 4 acre field, there was another ewe lambing further down the patch, maybe 80, 100 yards away. I saw the pair of ravens fly into a tree above the ewe lambing, I shouted, they didn’t move. The ewe lay down, they flew down, I yelled and swore and screamed, the birds ignored me.
I finally sorted out the ewe I was with, left her licking her lamb, ran down the field, shrieking like a banshee, the birds took off, flew over my head, and headed for the fresh lamb I had just drawn. I ran back up the field, took the ewe and lamb in, took about 10 minutes.
I went back out, the ewe was lambing, the lamb had just been born, minus an eye and it’s tongue. If only I had stayed in the field with my football rattle.
 
Location
Suffolk
Have you ever lambed ewes outside? My sheep are not on the hill, not even upland. The last lambing I did outside was so much more stressful than it could of been, simply because of the numbers of rooks, carrion crows, buzzards, kites and a pair of ravens that had decided to take up residence in my little fields for the duration of lambing.
The final straw was when I was lambing a ewe with a breech presentation at the top of a 4 acre field, there was another ewe lambing further down the patch, maybe 80, 100 yards away. I saw the pair of ravens fly into a tree above the ewe lambing, I shouted, they didn’t move. The ewe lay down, they flew down, I yelled and swore and screamed, the birds ignored me.
I finally sorted out the ewe I was with, left her licking her lamb, ran down the field, shrieking like a banshee, the birds took off, flew over my head, and headed for the fresh lamb I had just drawn. I ran back up the field, took the ewe and lamb in, took about 10 minutes.
I went back out, the ewe was lambing, the lamb had just been born, minus an eye and it’s tongue. If only I had stayed in the field with my football rattle.
From what I remember shortly before leaving to join HM Forces all the animals were gathered in the home paddock for lambing and it was hectic. Yes there were numerous eyeless lambs. Never saw a tongueless mind.
We were in soft gentle home counties though where awful things never happen.
SS
 

toquark

Member
From what I remember shortly before leaving to join HM Forces all the animals were gathered in the home paddock for lambing and it was hectic. Yes there were numerous eyeless lambs. Never saw a tongueless mind.
We were in soft gentle home counties though where awful things never happen.
SS
Exactly. Maybe best keeping your ill informed and ill judged opinions about how other work elsewhere to yourself then.
 

35% of English and Welsh farmers possibly/probably depressed

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

The Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution (RABI) has today, Thursday, October 14, published the findings of The Big Farming Survey, which shows 35% of English and Welsh farmers are either possibly or probably depressed.

The survey, based on over 15,000 responses, concentrates on the health and well-being of the farming community in England and Wales in the 2020s.

The Royal Agricultural Benevolent Institution (RABI) is a national charity that provides support to the farming community across England and Wales.

Mental health​


Mental well-being, the survey notes, describes our ability to cope with the ‘ups and downs’ of everyday life.

According to the survey, 14% of the farming community is ‘possibly depressed’ while...
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