Defender chassis

David1985

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Dorset
After some opinions, my 1998 defender 110 300 tdi went for mot today and I knew I was gonna be pushing it with chassis rot on the rear cross member. Me and my wife was hoping to get another year or so before we swapped the chassis. I’ve spoken to one garage who said when they change them it’s normally £7-10k to change depending on what else they find. I’m ok with a spanner normally, I’ve change the odd bush, brakes etc. I’m just wondering if it’s something that could be tackled by ourselves and prob save 2k in labour or is it worth just getting it done by a garage. Not much point patching up current chassis as just chucking good money onto bad.
 

Hilly

Member
After some opinions, my 1998 defender 110 300 tdi went for mot today and I knew I was gonna be pushing it with chassis rot on the rear cross member. Me and my wife was hoping to get another year or so before we swapped the chassis. I’ve spoken to one garage who said when they change them it’s normally £7-10k to change depending on what else they find. I’m ok with a spanner normally, I’ve change the odd bush, brakes etc. I’m just wondering if it’s something that could be tackled by ourselves and prob save 2k in labour or is it worth just getting it done by a garage. Not much point patching up current chassis as just chucking good money onto bad.
Yes, time time time , I’ve not done one but my best friend has and I trust his judgment in that he said it’s very easy, easier than he thought by long way but he’s very good 😂 but I intend doing mine myself when time comes.
 

roscoe erf

Member
Livestock Farmer
After some opinions, my 1998 defender 110 300 tdi went for mot today and I knew I was gonna be pushing it with chassis rot on the rear cross member. Me and my wife was hoping to get another year or so before we swapped the chassis. I’ve spoken to one garage who said when they change them it’s normally £7-10k to change depending on what else they find. I’m ok with a spanner normally, I’ve change the odd bush, brakes etc. I’m just wondering if it’s something that could be tackled by ourselves and prob save 2k in labour or is it worth just getting it done by a garage. Not much point patching up current chassis as just chucking good money onto bad.
Chassis galvanised is about 2.5k s 5k to change I’d say they didn’t want the job
 

john432

Member
Location
Carmarthenshire
Did my 110 high capacity pick up ,some 14 years ago. Had a Polish bloke working on the farm with me. And we did it quite easily. Removed the rear tub, cab and wings then came off as one unit, cargo straps and telehandler. Then lift out the engine and gearbox, swap the axles, and the rebuild.
 

Smith31

Member
Go and test drive a few modern pick ups, 4x4 's, if you're going to spend £7k -£10k on a 1998 Defender chassis you might as well spend that money and have bit of comfort. At that age it will have more then just rust issues, it could become a money pit.

Land Rovers have become similar to VW Transporters, they have a cult following based on being seen as fashionable rather then value for money.
 
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Go and test drive a few modern pick 4x4 's, if you're going to spend £7k -£10k on a 1998 Defender chassis you might as well spend that money and have bit of comfort. At that age it will have more then just rust issues, it could become a money pit.

Land Rovers have become similar to VW Transporters, they have a cult following based on being seen as fashionable rather then value for money.
Worth silly money with a new chassis though.
 

Smith31

Member
Worth silly money with a new chassis though.

If it was washed off clean and just left to sit in the corner of a shed covered for a few years, it would probably yield a better return of investment in comparison to spending £10k on a new chassis in my opinion?

The ones making strong money usually have shiny paint work and spotless interiors, they are a million miles away from a working farm truck.
 
If it was washed off clean and just left to sit in the corner of a shed covered for a few years, it would probably yield a better return of investment in comparison to spending £10k on a new chassis in my opinion?

The ones making strong money usually have shiny paint work and spotless interiors, they are a million miles away from a working farm truck.
I dunno there's some strong money getting handed out for some pretty rough ones. Chassis is a big job in many eyes and if it's been done a lot of people will pay good money and mess about with the rest themselves. In any case worth more with an mot. I'm no landrover fanboy btw my comfortable reliable warm dry jap pickup suits me just fine but you can't argue with LR values.
 
Go and test drive a few modern pick ups, 4x4 's, if you're going to spend £7k -£10k on a 1998 Defender chassis you might as well spend that money and have bit of comfort. At that age it will have more then just rust issues, it could become a money pit.

Land Rovers have become similar to VW Transporters, they have a cult following based on being seen as fashionable rather then value for money.

Now where is the fun in that?

What else can beat the classic LR pub talk. Yeah... I've got a late 90's Defender. Cool as fudge and reliable. No rust either. Flies through it's MOT. Utterly reliable.

I've kept it in mint condition, never let me down and can go anywhere unlike those soft SUVs or pick ups.

All I've done is basic maintenance like:

Rebuilt the engine and changed all the bottom end bearing shells whilst we were in there.

New turbo.

New wiring loom.

New clutch.

Reconditioned gearbox (well it was out because we were doing the clutch so thought might as well).

New exhaust- stainless so won't rot now.

New radiator and cooling package.

Then I changed the axles and fitted polyurethane bushes to the suspension- won't have any issues in future now I've done that.

Also, decided to change the chassis for a galvanised one. Couple that with aluminium body panels and hey presto, no rust.


See? It's a genuine Defender product mate. I've spent 60,000 on my Defender and my wife left me but heck, that truck is worth 50K now any day of the week. Shame I have to drive with one arm out the window because the Defender doesn't fit normal sized human beings.
 
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Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
I bashed the rear end of my D90 and it was declared a right off. Bought the salvage and a new rear cross member extension and a second hand tub and put it together myself (DIY mechanic). It flew through it's MOT and I sold it without much trouble. I think I came out with a profit of around £2,000 after buying the salvage and the insurance payout. So that's a thought for you. As I recall, it is only cutting and welding on the rear cross member, then nuts and bolts.
 

Pigken

Member
Location
Co. Durham
Think if you have any common sense it can be done easily, man where used to rent some buildings did chassis changes, would take him week by self at very very very lazy steady pace. Or just over a day with help from some one. Bulk head often gone or worth replacing or shot blast and paint galvanise when got apart. He would have all bits ready to swap. Think main thing was to lift body off equally back and front,, so not to bend any further. He would often have new chassis partly built on rolys ready to drop body on. Thank was 21 or 25 nuts /studs to undo. Just be mecanno set. Very worth doing. Photo as do in case of sale.
 

Ukjay

Member
Location
Wales!
Down yonder Axminster, Deveon way are these guys -


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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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