Demountable Ifor Williams

Discussion in 'Machinery' started by Skinnytinny, May 24, 2019.

  1. Skinnytinny

    Skinnytinny New Member

    Howdy, we have been on the look-out for a second hand Ifor Williams DP120 demountable trailer but have been waiting for one with the optional dropsides. We have only seen one for sale with these but it was the 10ft model and we'd like a 14 footer - can anyone tell me why almost no-one orders these when buying new, are they rubbish or do people realise, like I probably should, that the box will never come off anyway? Thanks.
     
  2. Bullring

    Bullring Member

    Location:
    Cornwall
    I ordered my dp120 with hinges for dropsides and ramp storage cause it's peanuts when specced from factory with the intention of taking the top off, only ever done it once and swore I'd never do it again when trying to put it back on. Since bought a dedicated flatbed.
     
  3. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    And do you like the wheels under the livestock body, some don't as they tend to snake at speed, apparently?
     
  4. Bullring

    Bullring Member

    Location:
    Cornwall
    I don't mind the wheels underneath, you gain 6 inches inside but the tyres have a habit of going egg shaped. If I was to buy again I think I would go wheels outside and it can be unstable with cattle in. It says in the handbook if loaded not to exceed 25 mph.
     
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  5. Cowcalf

    Cowcalf Member

    Location:
    North of Scotland
    10 minutes to take body off 15 to put back on
     
  6. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    25 mph ............. :eek:
     
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  7. DrDunc

    DrDunc Member

    Location:
    Dunsyre
    Fast enough when a 14 foot DP ifor loaded with cows is over 5 tonnes :whistle::ROFLMAO:
     
    mo!, Sharpy, Skinnytinny and 2 others like this.
  8. neilo

    neilo Member

    Location:
    Montgomeryshire
    We had a 14’ ‘demountable’ IW at home, as it might be handy sometimes. I think we only ever had the top off twice, as it was less bother to borrow a flat bed from elsewhere.
    On top of that, it ate tyres (see post above about ‘eggs’) and snaked horribly from 45-50mph unless you checked tyre pressures were all equal before every journey.

    Moving up here and having to source a new trailer, I opted for a 14’ stock trailer with wheels on the outside. If I need a flatbed (very rare), I can hire one locally for £30/day. Trailer tows better & safer, and has only had one tyre in 7 years (as a result of a brake locking on).
     
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  9. Red Fred

    Red Fred Member

    I have a 120 and sometimes take the top off (20 mins with the loader) to carry the mini digger. I've found that for doing tractor work at Mrs Fred's stables, it is easier to drive the little B250 into the cattle box after having remembered to take the exhaust pipe out, rather than take off the top or drive the modern tractor all the way there, 13 miles. It works very well and I drive it up the cattle ramp to load it.
    I've never had a problem carrying cattle with the little wheels although I don't go on the motorway. As long as it is loaded properly with the partition, it has always felt OK and it has done 20 years now.
    Wish I had ordered the side hinges though, as it would make it even more useful.
     
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  10. Cmoran

    Cmoran Member

    I’ve two 120s twin axle and tri axle which I leave the deck down permanently I personally wouldn’t buy a trailer with the wheels outside the extra width makes such a difference to the amount of stock that can go in them. Never found them hard on tyres have burst a few needlessly though . Between the two trailers they are on my Jeep for 20000 miles per year!!
     
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  11. BredRedHfd

    BredRedHfd Member

    We have a 14' dp120. Came with sides, ladder rack, ramps. Most importantly, proper demount stands. Highly recommended to take it off on concrete to make it easier to put back on. Take off maybe 3/4 times a year. No big job. Can't justify another flatbed for occasional use, so this fits the bill.
    Tyres, important to keep up near 90lbs. Follows well, as long as cattle well partitioned. Nice going through town by parked cars, as trailer same width as Disco.
    While waiting for trailer to be delivered, borrowed a Graham Edwards tried axle. That was so wide, was scary passing cars in town. :eek:Didn't like at all. Love the Ifor (y)
     
  12. mar

    mar Member

    I had the same predicament, I hadn't enough work to justify two separate trailers so thought a DP would be the ideal solution. Like yourself I had doubts if it would work or not. I arranged with a dealer to get one for a couple of days to get one and see how I got on with it. I took it home loosened the bolts and tried to take them out of the holes and that was as far as I went with it. I left it back and bought a 12x 5' 6" flatbed with sides. I already had a cattle trailer but it is worn out at this stage.

    I still like the idea of the DP trailer and would have one if IW came up with a better way of attaching and lining up the demountable top to the trailer. The bolts would be hard to line up if things were out of line.
    Get one out for a day and take the top of and on to see how you get on
     
    Skinnytinny likes this.
  13. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    But I'm guessing you could make long pointed alignment pins (long with a handle just pull it out when aligned and drop the bolt in), to help especially if it was raining?
     
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  14. Yep, I switch mine over quite often.
    I would rather expend a little effort now and again, rather than spend a large amount of hard earned money on a second trailer.
    They are not bad to do when you know how to.
     
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  15. Red Fred

    Red Fred Member

    I find the only problem with the bolts is the two in the middle, as the long sides can flex a bit. I have a length of wood I slide across inside and it prises the sides apart enough to get the bolts in.
    I had a puncture this week with a load of cattle on board, and the first warning was the fact that the ramp hook wouldn't close as the whole trailer had flexed over to that side.
     
    Skinnytinny likes this.
  16. Podger (y) for lining up the bolt holes

    trailler jacks can be used to make up adjustable legs to park it on.with just a bit of workshop time and thought.
     
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  17. Red Fred

    Red Fred Member

    I find it is the springyness rather than the initial alignment. Once I remove my podger, the hole moves... (never thought I'd say that on the forum :) )
     
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  18. there is a tool that Ifor williams usualy supply with the demount kit, that hooks into the rib hoops and helps align. It also has a slot to leaver the bolts out when disassembling.
     
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  19. Cowcalf

    Cowcalf Member

    Location:
    North of Scotland
    I only use the four end bolts to secure box down , but as above there is a tool to aid alignment of middle bolts
     
    Skinnytinny likes this.
  20. C.J

    C.J Member

    Location:
    South Devon
    [​IMG]
    Anyone used scaffold jacks ? £9 each
     
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