Direct drilling Headlands

8770mike

New Member
Hey guys , I would like to here from any of you experienced direct drilling growers as to the drilling of your headlands ,do you drill them first or last ,do any cultivations on the headlands prior to drilling ? , and if so either way have you noticed a drop in yield on headlands ? Cheers
 

Louis Mc

Member
Location
Meath, Ireland
Hey guys , I would like to here from any of you experienced direct drilling growers as to the drilling of your headlands ,do you drill them first or last ,do any cultivations on the headlands prior to drilling ? , and if so either way have you noticed a drop in yield on headlands ? Cheers
I do the headlands first and don't cultivate them at all. I figure it's easier to put seed in before turning on the headlands, sometimes it comes quicker where I was turning with the drill so doesn't seem to do any harm. It's also nice that if you start a field late in the day you can get headlands out of the way in daylight and easy finishing off the middle in darkness
 

Clive

Staff Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lichfield
We do them last, same as we did when we used to cultivate everything

think first or last is simply a regional thing


dont think it really makes any difference
 

clbarclay

Member
Location
Worcestershire
I tend to drill headlands first mainly to have a mark to work to, but if conditions are marginal wet I drill after or the tyres turning can smudge and cap the damp disturbed soil.
 

britt

Member
I do headlands first.
I think that I get more even drilling depth before the ground has been squashed down or cut up. Turning then helps to close the slot if it's less than ideal conditions.
 

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Industry-wide ruminant group to tackle endemic diseases across the UK

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Written by John Swire

A new UK-wide cattle and sheep industry group is to be created to speed up progress against endemic diseases and reputational challenges which are costing the cattle and sheep sectors at least £500 million per year.

An industry consultation* on creating the new group had a strong majority supporting the move in principle, with many believing it will accelerate work to...
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