Disc position and soil flow.

TrickyT

Member
At the last two matches with my Fergie plough, I have had issues with the soil flowing around the side of the disc and to the outside.

I have tired widening the disc, but with the rear it has then been producing a stepped furrow and still the soil flowed around the outside.

Today at Hereford, is some nice soil, I had originally had the disc lower than normal to cut a clean wall, I would have thought about 1/2" above the shear and 1/2" width.

With it set like this, there was quite a significant amount of soil flowing around the front furrow into the rear. I then raised them to about 1 1/4" before even widening them to about 1 1/4", but it still happened.

I would have thought I was ploughing about 6".

I has only happened at the last 2 matches and seems to be more on the front than rear.

It might also have been that these 2 matches were on slight slopes.

It could also just be that I am out of practice, but any advice would be appreciated.

Regards

Trevor
 

Ford4610

New Member
I had a similar problem but the soil kept building up at the shin piece. The soil was very light and tillage with little soil structure. I would imagine if the discs and boards were dull could be a problem. I'm not an expert.
 

Howard150

Member
Location
Yorkshire
Sounds very much like a combination between newish points and oldish discs.
Generally speaking a good starting point is for the disc to be 1 to 2 fingers above the share at the closest point and the flat of 1 finger away from the share with all the play taken out. In some circumstances discs can be run deeper, such as a finish disc run lower than the share. Unfortunately there is no substitute for new discs and shanks. Make sure you have no stops set to limit free movement radially.
Generally speaking once again, then the centre of the disc should be directly above the point. Set a little further back and the work will be more polished, depending on where you have the skimmers set.
Hope this helps.
 

TrickyT

Member
Thanks for your reply.

I think I may have had the disc a bit low and ploughing a bit too deep for a Ferige plough.

Unfortunately you cannot alter the disc position on a Fergie, so the centre of the disc is about halfway up the shear.

Will have another go at the weekend and see what happens.

Trevor
 

MrNoo

Member
Location
Cirencester
Set a little further back and the work will be more polished,
.
Is this because the share is doing more, more pressure applied as it's not got a cut edge, I assume also the disc rotation would help provide a push force (to a degree) against the soil onto the share thereby helping.
As an aside, "clean bottoms" why do some ploughs produce them on the furrow and others dont? Share angle? curvature of the share? World style produce clean bottoms but then they seem to have a curve to the share when viewed from horizontal side on. YL44's seem to produce a clean bottom too (well some do and other ploughmen dont) Some of our Fergie shares are the same shape as YL44's and yet they dont seem to be able to produce the clean furrow bottom despite running as long a top link as possible, so what creates the clean bottom? Pitch of share relative to board? Just interested as do like the "clean look"
 

Howard150

Member
Location
Yorkshire
Is this because the share is doing more, more pressure applied as it's not got a cut edge, I assume also the disc rotation would help provide a push force (to a degree) against the soil onto the share thereby helping.
As an aside, "clean bottoms" why do some ploughs produce them on the furrow and others dont? Share angle? curvature of the share? World style produce clean bottoms but then they seem to have a curve to the share when viewed from horizontal side on. YL44's seem to produce a clean bottom too (well some do and other ploughmen dont) Some of our Fergie shares are the same shape as YL44's and yet they dont seem to be able to produce the clean furrow bottom despite running as long a top link as possible, so what creates the clean bottom? Pitch of share relative to board? Just interested as do like the "clean look"
The cleanest furrow bottoms are usually seen when a specially adapted finishing share is used. These usually cut wider, leaving little or no hinge, and are fitted with a triangular piece which fills the gap between the back of the share and the bottom of the board. Steel versus Cast can also have a bearing as can how ‘sharp’ a share is, with too sharp a leading edge not always giving the best results. Pitch and disc position also have a bearing as does speed and ploughing too deep, allowing crumbs to escape over the back of the board.
 
I tend to get a bot of loose soil falling outside to the left of the disc, generally only a problem doing the split and the finish. I've struggled to stop it in the looser soils. To some extent its improved adjusting the width, but no resolved. I maybe need to look at the fore/aft adjustment...
 

Howard150

Member
Location
Yorkshire
I tend to get a bot of loose soil falling outside to the left of the disc, generally only a problem doing the split and the finish. I've struggled to stop it in the looser soils. To some extent its improved adjusting the width, but no resolved. I maybe need to look at the fore/aft adjustment...
Finish or left hand disc needed Charlie. Ones off a reversible are best as you can slide the hub fore and aft along the square. You also have the benefit of being infinitely adjustable on the splines.to better control the depth without moving the shank
 
Last edited:
Finish or left hand disc needed Charlie. Ones off a reversible are best as you can slide the hub fore and aft along the square. You also have the benefit of being infinitely adjustable on the splines.to better control the depth without moving the shank
I use a LH disc, I think its the positioning fore and aft that probably my problem...
 

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